Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

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Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:21 am

Poster from Espn boards posted this. This one for you Rem


Romanista


http://boards.espn.go.com/boards/mb/mb?sport=mlb&id=bos&tid=2157239&lid=16


"Hank is crazy I've never seen an owner make so many public comments. I think I be aggrivated if John Henry was opening his mouth to the Herald everyday ranting about trading for baseball players. I feel bad for Yankees fans the only people Hank is good for is the media."

You probably weren't a baseball fan in the 80s/90s if you say you've never seen an owner do this, because George was just as big a loud mouth as Hank is.
Now, correct me if I'm wrong, but under the George Era (around 3 decades) we won 6 World Series (one less than you've won throughout your history), 10 AL Pennants (two less than you've won throughout the past century), 15 AL East titles (More than double the titles you've won), 3 Wild Card Berths, which (in our more recent history) meant that we've been to the post season 13 times consecutively (which you obviously haven't come anywhere near achieving)
Say what you want about Hank talking too much (I personally hate it, I wouldn't mind if he shut up a little) but George did the exact same thing and it proved to be far more successful than the Boston strategy.



"And our ownership team doesn't have a loudmouth that is as embarrassing as a drunk uncle at a wedding."

Yes our ownership leading us to dominating baseball over the years has been VERY embarassing.

You guys just won a World Series, and you claim that you're a dynasty now. Why do you still care so much about us?

If I had just won the WS a few months ago I wouldn't really care about any other team, I'd be happy with my own.

Or do you guys feel threatened?

Seriously I come in here to read the latest about the Red Sox because I'm a fan of baseball and I like to know about my competition. However every single time I come on here I find something bad about the Yankees.

Get over it already, you're the reigning world champions. Why do you care if we're arrogant or if our owner talks too much or if our 3rd baseman is a greedy diva?
Are those YOUR problems to deal with?
No, they're ours.
That's like us being pissed off that Papelbon fed the game-winning ball to his dog. We couldn't give less of a sh_t about it because it's an embarassment to your team, not ours.

So if our team is an embarassment (which it isn't) then why do YOU care?
If we're making mistakes then why do YOU care?
Wouldn't that mean that your team will continue winning if we start to mess up?

Get over your inferiority complex already, it's getting old.



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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:23 am

As someone who doesn't have a dog in the New York vs. Boston war, I have to say that these boards (and others) demonstrate an unhealthy preference on both sides to schadenfreude over any joy in their own successes.
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Hank is crazy I've never seen an owner make so many public comments. I think I be aggrivated if John Henry was opening his mouth to the Herald everyday ranting about trading for baseball players. I feel bad for Yankees fans the only people Hank is good for is the media.

Sort of like your posts.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:26 am


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QUOTE(billy ashley @ Jan 3 2008, 02:46 AM) *
It’s amazing how stacked both New York and Boston are considering both had such weak systems not so long ago. The fact that both NY and Boston can both be argued as 2 of the top 5 minor league organizations has to make other teams really uncomfortable. Especially considering Hughes, Pedroia, Melky Cabrera and Manny Del Carmen have all graduated with in the past two years. The next decade should be a lot of fun.


The big change was after the better part of a decade of ignoring the draft, the Yankees finally decided to spend money there about 3 years ago, and it has made a huge change in their success,

Chamberlain, Jackson, Horne, Brackman are all big time bonus babies who charged a real premium to sign. Even Kennedy to a lesser degree. All guys who would not have been drafted 5 years ago
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post Jan 3 2008, 06:49 PM
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Instead of starting a new thread, I'll just post it here. In November, Kevin Goldstein of Baseball Prospectus did his Yankee top 11 list.

LINK

Five-Star Prospects
1. Joba Chamberlain, RHP
Four-Star Prospects
2. Ian Kennedy, RHP
3. Austin Jackson, OF
4. Jose Tabata, OF
5. Alan Horne, RHP
Three-Star Prospects
6. Dellin Betances, RHP
7. Jesus Montero, C
8. Andrew Brackman, RHP
9. Edwar Ramirez, RHP
10. Kelvin DeLeon, OF
Two-Star Prospects
11. Humberto Sanchez, RHP

Just Missing: Frank Cervelli, C; Jeff Marquez, RHP; Ross Ohlendorf, RHP; Brad Suttle, 3B
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post Jan 4 2008, 11:32 AM
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Chaimberlain isn't a prospect. He has already arrived. And why isn't Ohlendorf on Goldstein's list?

These lists undervalue Betances and Sanchez. Both of those guys are outstanding prospects if they can overcome their medical issues.
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post Jan 4 2008, 11:49 AM
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QUOTE(Curmudgeon @ Jan 4 2008, 11:32 AM) *
Chaimberlain isn't a prospect. He has already arrived. And why isn't Ohlendorf on Goldstein's list?

He's still rookie eligible, which makes him a prospect, according to the criteria of most of these published lists.


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post Jan 5 2008, 03:18 PM
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QUOTE(Curmudgeon @ Jan 4 2008, 11:32 AM) *
And why isn't Ohlendorf on Goldstein's list? These lists undervalue Betances and Sanchez. Both of those guys are outstanding prospects if they can overcome their medical issues.


These lists are taking their medical problems into account. The players will have to overcome them rather than having them discounted and wished away based on their upside.


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post Jan 5 2008, 04:54 PM
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QUOTE(Munson @ Jan 5 2008, 03:18 PM) *
These lists are taking their medical problems into account. The players will have to overcome them rather than having them discounted and wished away based on their upside.



Yet Brackman is still on the lists.
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post Jan 5 2008, 07:36 PM
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Don't get me started on Brackman. I'm chalking him up as another winner of BA's "Congratulations, you were just drafted! Welcome to the Top 10!" award. I think Betances won that last year...

Although the more I think about it, the more I agree with Curmudgeon. Sanchez should have made this list.


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post Today, 09:11 AM
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These lists are usually a crap shoot after the top part anyway. it's always a mix of guys who might be awsome but shown little (or nothing ) or guys that showed something but dont' look like he's going to be much .. and a lot of inbetweens.

I usually dont' like to rate guys with little to no performance above rookie ball anywhere high.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:28 am

buffs44444 wrote: Callis comment that Daeges won't even make the Sox top 30 just further blows my mind as to why you take a guy like him rather than a guy like Betances at that point in the '06 draft. I know there were a lot of medical factors that probably led to the Sox skipping Joba Chamberlain and taking Kris Johnson one pick ahead of the Yankees selection of Chamberlain in that same draft, but taking organizational filler like Daeges rather than a kid with the potential of Betances just rankles me for some reason.

If memory serves me correctly, Betances said he would only sign with the Yankees. I could be confusing him with someone else but I'm fairly certain that was Betances.

When it comes to Joba Chamberlain, I was shocked when they took Jason Place over him.

I don't think Daeges is "organizational filler". I think it's too soon to right him off but at this point in time, things are way too grey to project anything about him. His frame, strikezone discipline, and ability to put the bat on the ball say to hold off on calling his success purely Clear Channel Stadium. The main strike against Zach Daeges right now (other than age) is lack of a true position.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:30 am

ROGER: I’M DONE
RILED ROCKET TELLS ‘60 MINUTES’ HE’S READY TO RETIRE
By BRIAN COSTELLO
ROGER CLEMENS
ROGER CLEMENS
Discussion Board
The only reason that the media is going after Clemens is because he is WHITE err I mean becauce Bonds is Black, wait a second I`m confused, I thought everything was about race in the USA. "Liberalism is a mental disorder", take your medication!!
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January 7, 2008 -- An angry Roger Clemens told Mike Wallace he will never pitch again in an interview aired last night on “60 Minutes."

The 45-year-old pitcher defended himself against allegations he used steroids and human growth hormone, but said he is so frustrated he is through with baseball.

“I understand that as a public person, you're gonna take some shots," Clemens said. “The higher you get up on the flagpole, the more your butt shows? And I understand all that. But I'm tired of answering to 'em. That's why I will not ever play again. I don't want to answer to it. I want to slide off and be just a citizen."

When pressed by Wallace, Clemens asserted he is done pitching.

“You'll never see me pitch again," said Clemens, who has retired before several times only to return.

The interview was filmed more than a week ago at Clemens' home outside Houston. The former Yankees star will face more questions today in a news conference in downtown Houston.

Clemens has been dealing with the fallout of the Mitchell Report for nearly a month. His former personal trainer, Brian McNamee, told former Sen. George Mitchell that he injected Clemens with steroids and HGH.

Clemens filed a defamation lawsuit against McNamee Sunday night in Harris County District Court in Texas, listing 15 alleged statements McNamee made to the baseball drug investigator George Mitchell. Clemens claimed the statement were "untrue and defamatory."

In last night's interview, Clemens clearly was angered that the public has accepted the Mitchell Report as fact.

“I'm angry that, that what I've done for the game of baseball and the personal, in my private life, what I've done that I, I don't get the benefit of the doubt," Clemens said. “The stuff that's being said, it's ridiculous.

“It's hogwash for people to even assume this. Twenty-four, 25 years Mike. You'd think I'd get an inch of respect. An inch. How, how can you prove your innocence?"

McNamee's lawyer, Earl Ward, said after watching the interview that Rusty Hardin, Clemens' lawyer, had given his client some bad advice.

“I thought it was a fairly impassioned plea, but it was disingenuous and desperate," Ward said. “I think Rusty Hardin has done more to put Roger Clemens in jail than any federal prosecutor would be able to. It wasn't a wise move. Certainly now if he goes before Congress they have a transcript to challenge his credibility."

Clemens and McNamee have been invited to testify before Congress next week. Clemens said he will say the same thing on Capitol Hill he said to Wallace. Ward said McNamee would wait to see what Clemens says today and next week in front of Congress before deciding about suing Clemens for defamation.

A published report yesterday said Clemens and McNamee spoke by phone Friday, but Ward could not confirm that yesterday.

In the interview, Wallace listed each of the allegations in the Mitchell Report, and Clemens denied each one.

“Never happened," he said. “Never happened. And if, if, if I have these needles and these steroids and all these drugs, what, where did I get 'em? Where is the person out there gave 'em to me? Please, please come forward."

The attorneys for Clemens and McNamee have traded verbal barbs for weeks. When asked why McNamee, his trainer of 10 years, would tell Mitchell these things, Clemens was stumped other than speculating he was trying to avoid jail for distributing steroids.

“I don't know," Clemens said. “I'm so upset about it, how I treated this man and took care of him."

Mitchell invited Clemens to speak to him during his investigation, but Clemens declined.

“I listened to my counsel," he said. “I was advised not to. A lot of the players didn't go down and talk to him.

“But if I would've known what this man, Brian McNamee, had said in this report, I would have been down there in a heartbeat to take care of it."

McNamee also named Clemens' good friend, Andy Pettitte, to Mitchell and said he had injected Pettitte with HGH. Two days after the release of the Mitchell Report, Pettitte admitted it was true, giving McNamee credibility.

“I had no knowledge of what Andy was doing," Clemens said. “Andy's case is totally is, is totally separate. I was shocked to learn about Andy's situation. (I) had no idea about it."

Roger Clemens stood by his story last night on “60 Minutes," telling Mike Wallace he never took steroids or HGH, exhibiting anger and surprise at the public's lack of belief in his denials and suggesting he may consider suing someone for the allegations in the Mitchell Report. Here's a look at a few of Clemens' more provocative statements:

'My body never changed. If he's putting that stuff up in my body, if what he's saying which is totally false, if he's doing that to me, I should have a third ear coming out of my forehead. I should be pulling tractors with my teeth.'

'I'm angry that, that what I've done for the game of baseball and the personal, in my private life, what I've done that I, I don't get the benefit of the doubt. The stuff that's being said, it's ridiculous. It's hogwash for people to even assume this. Twenty four, 25 years Mike. You'd think I'd get an inch of respect. An inch. How, how can you prove your innocence?'

'And that's our country, isn't it? Guilty before innocent. That's the way our country works now. And then everybody's talking about sue, sue sue. Should I sue? Well, let me exhaust. Let me, let me just spend. How about, let's keep spending. But I'm gonna explore what I can do and then I want to see if it's gonna be worth it, worth all the headache.'

brian.costello@nypost.com

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Brain Transplant Success

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:33 am

Brain Transplant Success

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F04E4D6173BF93BA25755C0A964948260&sec=&spon=
Came across this interesting article in the NY Times:

Transplant Success Reported With Part Of A Mouse's Brain

Makes you wonder what's actually possible if science were actually allowed to pursue this sort of thing to it's ultimate goal - the transplantation of human consciousness to a donor body, and not necessarily one which is the same gender - or even human!

Maybe Great Ted Williams brain can be in Sully Body ?

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:43 am

So Roger decided to sue. Basically with all of this going on, people are overlooking the fact that Mitchell was pressured to release that report and didn't even consider the reliability of his sources. Selig played it smart by getting guy who was linked to baseball BUT with an impecable and respected reputation. This way no one questions him.

At the end of the day, Selig is to blame for all of this. Matter of fact, i believe that Selig should be asked to step down AND Mitchell's reputation should take a hit here. Selig rode the players' bats and arms to get his $6 billion revenue and legacy for bringing money to the game.

Instead of having a well thorough and iinvestigative report, Mitchell submitted to the pressure of baseball and released a half-@$$ report by claiming that he "only worked with what was available". THAT IS HORSE$H!T! there are plenty of articles out there with guys who were willing to talk about the rampant use of steroids as back as the 1980's. The Marlins, Redsox, and Mariners guys come to mind. Trainers, ex-players, ex-coaches had TONS AND TONS of information for Mitchell but ofcourse, this was information implicating MLB executives, owners, team execs and SELIG himself.

Everyone is so focused on the players, Clemens, Pettite, etc. But forget or just breeze through guys like Selig and the Teams.

And here we go again with Congress and their grandstanding. If they really are concerned with steroids in baseball they have to grill Selig and disect Mitchell's report for being half@$$ and the time of the release for the report.

If anyone here doesn't think that baseball has more power than we imagine, they're smoking something. Think about it, Selig hired an ex-senator who is tied to baseball with an impecable reputation to get CONGRESS off his back.

So stop focusing on the players and bid for Selig to relinquish his job as commish.
HERE IS TO 2008!

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Giants

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:46 am

Scouts Buzz


http://scores.espn.go.com/nfl/recap?gameId=280106027

After Tampa Bay jumped out to the early lead, the Giants' base 4-3 defensive scheme became more aggressive with a zone pressure package to force Bucs QB Jeff Garcia into some uncharacteristic errant throws and turnovers. On offense, the Giants took control of the game with a power-zone running attack, led by the one-two punch of Brandon Jacobs and Ahmad Bradshaw. They simply wore down the undersized 4-3 defensive front of the Tampa Bay defense and enabled New York to dictate the tempo. It was also a very good day for QB Eli Manning. After a slow start, Manning was sharp, completing high-percentage throws, moving the chains and, most importantly, not making any game-changing mistakes or poor decisions.
-- Ken Moll, Scouts Inc.

· Complete Week 1 Scouts Buzz

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Poised, patient Manning delivers for Giants

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:46 am

Poised, patient Manning delivers for Giants

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/playoffs07/columns/story?columnist=pasquarelli_len&id=3184238

TAMPA, Fla. -- In the notebook Eli Manning maintains as part of his game preparation, a diary of personal insights and ideas gleaned from videotape inspection of the upcoming opponent and perusal of his own team's plan of attack, the New York Giants' quarterback kept scribbling down the same one-word reminder last week.

Patience.

"It was the main thing I wanted to drive home to myself," Manning acknowledged Sunday evening as he strolled down a corridor in the bowels of Raymond James Stadium with his first postseason win now embossed on his NFL résumé. "Against a defense like the one that [Tampa Bay] plays, you don't want to force things because the Bucs are so good at taking the ball away. You can't allow yourself to get too frustrated. Probably, early on today, part of the problems we had were maybe because I was a little too conservative, you know? But in the end, just staying calm and settling into the game, it paid off for us."

Indeed, patience is almost always virtuous. But for the Giants, and especially for Manning on Sunday afternoon, it was an attribute that proved victorious, as well, as New York dominated Tampa Bay 24-14 in a wild-card contest that wasn't really as close as the final score might suggest.

The win was the first postseason victory for New York since its 2000 NFC Championship Game rout of Minnesota, which earned the Giants a spot in Super Bowl XXXV. It means a matchup Sunday against the division rival Dallas Cowboys, a team that defeated the Giants twice in the regular season.

But in those two losses, Manning generally played well, completing 51 of 75 throws for 548 yards, with five touchdown passes and three interceptions, for a passer rating of 94.9. And since their season-opening loss at Texas Stadium -- a 45-35 shootout in which Manning threw for 312 yards and four touchdowns -- the Giants haven't lost on the road, with Sunday's wild-card win their eighth straight away from home.

Coming off their disappointing 38-35 loss to New England in the regular-season finale, a defeat that came as close to a moral victory as any New York veteran would ever concede and that several players noted might well be a momentum builder for the playoffs, the Giants arrived here "knowing the consequences," according to coach Tom Coughlin. And Manning, who had lost the first two playoff appearances of his career, certainly understood what might transpire if he was careless with the football against a Bucs defense that led the NFL in takeaway/turnover differential in 2007 with a plus-25 mark.

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Eli Manninng

AP Photo/Chris O'Meara

After a slow start, Eli Manning found his rhythm and led the Giants to their first playoff win since 2000.
So Manning, who tied for the league lead in interceptions (20), was notably cautious and quite deliberate in the manner in which he challenged the Tampa Bay defense.

But in completing 20 of 27 passes for 185 yards, with two touchdown passes, no interceptions and an efficiency rating of 117.1, Manning was very effective. The Giants, who had the fifth-most turnovers in the league in 2007 (34), didn't give the ball away at all Sunday afternoon.

"Eli played smart," said Tampa Bay cornerback Brian Kelly. "He made safe throws. He didn't take chances, and he didn't give us any opportunities to capitalize on mistakes because he just didn't make any."

The Bucs don't play nearly as much Cover 2 in the secondary as they once did, and on Sunday they relied on a lot of single-high safety looks early, which forced Manning to throw quick-hitch routes. But once he completed a few of those, Manning gained a rhythm and loosened up the Tampa Bay coverages.

Manning completed only one pass of more than 20 yards, a 21-yard hookup with rookie wide receiver Steve Smith. The play set up tailback Brandon Jacobs' 8-yard touchdown run, a blast over left tackle that gave the Giants a 14-7 halftime lead. And Manning averaged only 9.3 yards per completion and 6.8 yards per attempt. But after a very sluggish start, with the Giants going three-and-out on each of their first three possessions and not registering their initial first down until early in the second quarter, Manning managed the game nicely and operated with poise and precision.

And, as his teammates agreed, with admirable patience.

"He showed a lot of calm," said wide receiver Amani Toomer, who led the Giants with seven catches for 74 yards and whose 4-yard touchdown reception in the fourth quarter boosted New York to a 24-7 lead. "He didn't let the slow start get to him. He didn't rush anything, and just played inside himself and let the game come to him. Once we all settled in, he got into a rhythm. It was impressive. After the first quarter, he made a lot of big plays."

Two moments, each of which emphasized the patience Manning demonstrated, stood out.

The first was the 21-yard completion to Smith, a third-and-2 play on which Manning began to throw, pulled the ball down and reloaded, then allowed the rookie wide receiver to find a void in the Bucs' secondary as he continued his route. Had Manning released the ball when he initially cocked his arm, with Smith in a crowd, the pass might well have been intercepted.

Instead, the play resulted in a first down at the Tampa Bay 17-yard line, and Jacobs scored two snaps later.

The second instance was a surgical 15-play, 92-yard drive in the fourth quarter that culminated in the touchdown pass to Toomer. The long series, which consumed 8:37 in clock time, represented the Giants' longest touchdown march since a 95-yard scoring trek against the Baltimore Colts in the historic 1958 NFL championship game. That was the landmark overtime contest that thrust the league into national prominence.

On a first-and-10 play, Manning twice pumped before finding tight end Kevin Boss for 11 yards. On a second-and-10, he showed terrific timing, hitting wideout Plaxico Burress for 14 yards on a stop route to the left side. Then, on the touchdown throw to Toomer, he lured Tampa Bay cornerback Ronde Barber inside with a slight pump fake toward Boss. The hesitation bought Toomer enough time to uncover to the outside of the end zone.

"A big-time drive" was Manning's assessment of the long series that drained the life from the Bucs' defense and quashed any hopes of a Tampa Bay rally.

Mostly because of the big-time performance from Manning, who must play just as well -- and perhaps even better -- for New York to have a chance of upsetting the top-seeded Cowboys in a week.

"We know their team, and we know what they like to do," said Manning, who earned his first postseason victory on his third try. "Who knows, the third time might be the charm."

Senior writer Len Pasquarelli covers the NFL for ESPN.com.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:47 am

UNSTOPPABLE THATS WHATS ELI MANNING IS!!

WOOOOOOOOOooo

YOU ALL THOUGHT THE MAGICAL BEARD THEORY WAS INCORRECT:

1) SLY STALLONE: ROCKY 4, OVER THE TOP, NIGHT STALKERS
2) TOMMIE LEE JONES: THE HUNTED
3) PACINO : SERPICO

MOST OF ALL... THE MAN WHO'S DELICIOUS JOWELS SINGLE HANDEDILY MADE THE BIGGEST NBA PLAYOFF UPSET HAPPEN, THE ONE, THE ONLY BARON DAVIS!!!!!!!

NOW REALIZE, ELI DOESNT SHAVE YET, BUT A 3 O CLOCK SHADOW ON ELI MIGHT AS WELL BE AS SIGNIFICANT AS THE MOUSTACHE ON ROLLIE FINGERS, GOOSE GOSSAGE AND THE INFAMOUS ANNOUNCER FROM THE ROCKY MOVIES, (WHO APPEARED IN: 1,2, 4 AND ROCKY BALBOA)

ONLY THE IMMORTAL WORDS OF THE NATURE BOY WHO IS STILL STYLIN' AND PROFILIN CAN HANDLE THIS FEELING RIGHT NOW:
WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:48 am

Eli spent some time watching Tom Brady apparently. I've watched every snap of this season and I never seen him pump fake so many times. And they all worked for big plays. A new wrinkle in his game that may make the difference between his mediocrity and emergence as a top-tier QB in this leagu

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:51 am

One thing Clemens can't change


http://insider.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=3184697&name=olney_buster

posted: Monday, January 7, 2008 | Feedback | Print Entry
filed under: MLB

Roger Clemens filed a defamation suit against Brian McNamee, writes Mary Flood and David Barron, just before "60 Minutes" aired in Houston.

But that won't change this fact: Roger Clemens' name is in the Mitchell report.

Clemens denied the charges on his Web site. He denied the charges in his interview with Mike Wallace. He presumably will again deny any steroid use when he meets with reporters Monday afternoon.

But that won't change this fact: His name is printed in the Mitchell report, forever.

Clemens presumably will go to Washington next week and testify before Congress, because to not accept the invitation to testify, at this point, would be tantamount, in the court of public opinion, to admitting guilt. Under oath, he presumably will testify that what McNamee said is completely false.

But that won't change this fact: His name is part of the Mitchell report, for ever and ever.

You assume that Clemens will follow up and take every opportunity to say, again and again, that he did not use steroids. The defamation suit presumably will require him to sit through depositions, to answer questions from McNamee's lawyers as part of discovery. Perhaps a jury will decide, in the end, that it believes Clemens and give him a victory in a defamation suit.

That won't change this fact: His name is part of the Mitchell report.

Clemens said something at the end of his "60 Minutes" interview that resonated: He will do everything he can to prove the charges are wrong, and that may still not be enough.

And Clemens is probably right. There is nothing that he can say or do that can change the reality that his name is in the Mitchell report, and his reputation is damaged forever. But he has chosen to fight the accusations, in a battle that he probably can never achieve complete success, and the stakes will continue to go up, day by day.

Brian McNamee's attorney thought Clemens was unbelievable in his interview, writes Wallace Matthews. Dave Krieger thought Clemens and Mike Wallace failed to deliver.

• A recurring question is why Clemens or any other player named in the report simply didn't come forward and meet with Mitchell investigators, once they were asked to do so. Part of the reason was uncertainty about what they were going to be asked, and uncertainty about what George Mitchell's version of due process was going to be.

Two days before the Mitchell report was released, a veteran agent described the concern: "Imagine if you got a summons to appear in court next Tuesday, but nobody would tell you why. Nobody would tell you what the charges are, nobody will tell you anything about the evidence being presented, and nobody will tell you who the witnesses are. When you have a case in court, there is a time of discovery so you can prepare a case. There was nothing like that, in any way, with the Mitchell people."

And Clemens indicated in the "60 Minutes" interview, in a roundabout way, that this was his experience. His agent told the Houston Chronicle, during the player's first interview with a newspaper, that Clemens was informed by Mitchell investigators only that they wanted to ask him about incidents in 1998, 2000 and 2001. Yes, he had been contacted by the Mitchell investigators, but he apparently never learned anything about Brian McNamee's cooperation with investigators until the day the report came out. For all Clemens knew, the Mitchell investigators wanted to ask him about the Los Angeles Times report that proved to be erroneous, or about what Jose Canseco wrote in his book regarding Clemens. If, in fact, Clemens was never informed along he way that Brian McNamee had alleged he had injected the pitcher with steroids, that is appalling.

Even if Clemens had met with Mitchell investigators and issued the same flat denials that he gave to Mike Wallace, there is no guarantee he would have escaped the Mitchell report. There are examples of players within the report who denied what was alleged by former Mets batboy Kirk Radomski, and yet they are still mentioned within the report.

We cannot be naïve; it may well be that everyone named within the report is guilty. But as a model for due process, the way the Mitchell investigation was conducted was horrific, something better suited for former Senator Joseph McCarthy than former Senator George Mitchell.

• Clemens now needs to tell the same story to Congress that he told to Mike Wallace, writes Mike Lupica. George Vecsey found Clemens to be unconvincing.

Richard Justice explains why Clemens is not getting the benefit of the doubt. Clemens failed to make his case, writes Phil Rogers. Dan Shaughnessy thinks Clemens looked dirty. Clemens' denials left us hanging, writes Peter Schmuck.

Within this piece, Mike Boddicker says he's seen Clemens injected with vitamin B-12.

PED Free Zone
• Brian Cashman says his job has changed, now that Hank and Hal Steinbrenner have taken over the Yankees, as Howard Ulman writes.

• Matt Capps and the Pirates are talking about a long-term deal, writes Dejan Kovacevic. Pirates pitching coach Jeff Andrews is beginning to prepare his staff.

• The Rangers finished their deal with Ben Broussard.

• The Rays are asking for ideas on how to augment their proposed ballpark. Tampa Bay signed a veteran backup catcher, writes Marc Topkin.

• Matt Clement tells Joe Strauss he's in a cool situation, in St. Louis.

• Cameron Maybin had an incredible 2007 season, as Keith Jarrett writes.

• Oakland players are wondering: OK, who's going to be the next player to be traded?

• The Marlins signed Jorge Cantu.

• The Rockies signed Josh Towers.

• Years of Hall of Fame snubs have hurt Andre Dawson, writes Dan Le Batard. Jim Rice belongs in the Hall, writes Tony Massarotti.

• Vanderbilt will open an athletics' Hall of Fame, and the first class will include 10 to 15.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:53 am

COMMENTARY
Doubt clouds the Clemens denials

By RICHARD JUSTICE
Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle


http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/5432700.html

You indignantly wondered why you haven't been given the benefit of the doubt. OK, Roger, we'll go over it one more time.

Your trainer of 10 years, a man named Brian McNamee, a man with zero incentive to lie, says he injected you with steroids and human growth hormone at least 16 times over a period of several years.

Your training partner and closest friend in baseball, Andy Pettitte, has acknowledged that McNamee injected him with human growth hormone. Even those of us who want to believe you are having a hard time getting our minds around the notion that McNamee would tell the truth about Pettitte and lie about Roger Clemens.

You allowed McNamee's side of the story to go unchallenged for far too long. You looked guilty by doing that even if you weren't guilty.

Your explanation that McNamee had injected you with lidocaine makes no sense. Where did you obtain lidocaine? It's only effective if injected directly into the joints, and it's highly unlikely a trainer would even attempt to give that kind of shot.

Then again, maybe you should have kept your mouth shut. This story is spinning out of control, to something far more serious than an aging ballplayer bending the rules to extend his career.

Next up: Novitzky
Now Congress wants you to tell your story under oath. Even worse, Newsday is reporting that IRS special agent Jeff Novitzky is interested in you.

Novitzky is the guy who investigated Barry Bonds and Marion Jones. He's a pit bull of an investigator and about the last person on earth you want looking into your business.

All that said, you did a nice job in that interview with Mike Wallace that aired Sunday night on 60 Minutes.

Considering how you followed a hit man, you had it easy. OK, bad joke.

This is the interview you should have done 15 minutes after the Mitchell Report was released. You were forceful and angry and believable.

If someone had been on the fence at the beginning of the interview, you might have persuaded them to believe you. Why did you wait so long? Your reputation was irreparably harmed by your silence.

Wallace asked the basic questions, and you stumbled only when asked about the lie-detector test. You seemed ready to agree to one, then said something about it not changing anyone's mind.

You told the Chronicle in an interview Sunday that you want to tell your story under oath before Congress.

Wallace didn't know enough to ask specifics about lidocaine. Nor did he press you on Pettitte.

That's a tough one. You and Pettitte spent hours training with one another. To think Pettitte would have taken such a significant step without you knowing is a stretch.

Those are questions you should be prepared for at this afternoon's news conference.

You and McNamee reportedly had a long telephone conversation Friday night. That chat will come up today as well.

But you did fine. Your answers didn't sound rehearsed, and considering that it might always be your word against his, you did the best you could, all things considered.

"It never happened."

"Never happened."

"I've trained hard my entire career."

"It didn't happen."

"Why didn't I keep doing it if it was so good for me? It's a quick fix. I don't believe in it."

"I was shocked. I was angry. I had a lot of emotions."

"I think the people that know me believe me and understand what I'm about."

Good name is gone
Here's hoping the people closest to you still believe in you. One of the things you told Wallace that sounded so sad is how you understand your good name is gone forever.

For 25 years, you were as respected as any player in the game. You were an amazing competitor and a good teammate. You were the best for a long list of reasons.

Maybe those teammates understand why you might have done what McNamee says you did. Baseball's owners and your union put players in a tough ethical quandary because they seemed to look the other way as steroid use soared.

Players would show up at spring training and lose their jobs to guys who had added 20 pounds of muscle. At the time McNamee says he first injected you with steroids, you looked like a guy facing the end of the road.

If McNamee is to be believed, you did what a lot of us would have done. Now you're fighting a battle you might not be able to win. During games, you were at your best when things looked hopeless. You worked hitters, umpires, crowds. You almost always found a way. You haven't shown the same kind of doggedness this time. You want the benefit of the doubt, but you haven't behaved like someone who deserves it.

"Twenty-four, 25 years, Mike," you said on television Sunday. "You'd think I'd get an inch of respect. An inch."

You'd think.

richard.justice@chron.com

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:57 am

Rays sign Ex-Met catcher Mike Difelice

http://www.sptimes.com/2008/01/07/Rays/Ex_Ray_Difelice_to_ba.shtml


An original Ray is coming back.

Catcher Mike Difelice, a Ray from 1998-2001, agreed to terms on a minor-league contract with an invitation to spring training and the opportunity to compete for a backup job.

"I've been with the Rays," he said Sunday. "I know where they're trying to get to. I wanted to be part of it and I still want to be."

Difelice, 38, spent most of the past three seasons with the Mets' Triple-A team, playing just 42 games in the big leagues, and only 17 the year before that with the Tigers and Cubs. His last full major-league season was 2003.

Difelice had offers with the Mets and other teams but said the opportunity for a major-league job as well as the chance to return to the Rays and play near his Palm Harbor home led him to take their offer.

"There were a lot of factors," he said. "I wanted the opportunity to compete."

The Rays have three catchers on their 40-man roster, starter Dioner Navarro and prospects Shawn Riggans and John Jaso, but little experience after letting Josh Paul and Raul Casanova go, though Paul could return.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:03 am

Yankees GM Cashman not thinking about 2009
Howard Ulman / Associated Press

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080106/SPORTS0104/801060343/1004/SPORTS

BOSTON -- New York Yankees general manager Brian Cashman is focused on this season, not his job status.

With one year left on his contract and senior vice president Hank Steinbrenner leaning toward pursuing a trade for Minnesota ace Johan Santana, Cashman said Saturday he's not thinking about what he'll do when his deal runs out.

"Because of all the work that gets involved with doing the job, it kind of prevents me from really looking ahead past this year," he said. "I'm just doing everything I possibly can to assist the transition with the new manager, the new owners, with the involvement now with the Steinbrenner sons. And then the rest will take care of itself at another time."

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New York and the Boston Red Sox talked with Minnesota during last month's winter meetings in Nashville, Tenn., about Santana, who can become a free agent after the 2008 season. The two-time Cy Young Award winner remains with the Twins and "right now, all's quiet," Cashman said.

Asked if he thought Santana would start the season with Minnesota, Boston general manager Theo Epstein said, "I have a hard enough time keeping track of our own players."

The Red Sox have made no significant player changes since winning their second World Series title in four seasons.

Epstein, Cashman, Toronto general manager J.P. Ricciardi, agent Scott Boras and Red Sox senior baseball operations adviser Bill James answered questions Saturday at a fundraiser for the Foundation To Be Named Later started by Epstein and his brother, Paul. About 300 fans attended the two-hour session at Fenway Park.

The Yankees won four World Series from 1996-2000, then lost in 2001 to Arizona. After that, their emphasis shifted to obtaining proven veterans, Cashman said. Some, like pitcher Kevin Brown, were past their prime.

"We got away from some of the core principles of our business operation, which is we just started going all veteran-oriented," Cashman said. "We had a chance to really go into an abyss" early in the 2005 season.

Cashman almost left the Yankees when his contract expired after that year. But when he was given full control over baseball operations, allowing him to emphasize his preference for developing young players, he signed a three-year contract.

That gave him one more year than manager Joe Torre. After last season, when Torre left for the Los Angeles Dodgers and was replaced by Joe Girardi, and owner George Steinbrenner's sons, Hank and Hal, became more involved, Cashman is headed into a season of transition.

"Things have changed here in the third year," Cashman said. "I'm learning as I go along, too. But it is different. But one thing is that I've been with this family, the Steinbrenner family, for well over 20 years. So I'm focused fully on doing everything I possibly can to assist them in their emergence now as decision makers."

Hank Steinbrenner said Friday in Tampa, Fla., that some people in the Yankees organization are leaning against trying to trade for Santana, a deal that likely would cost them right-hander Phil Hughes, center fielder Melky Cabrera and another promising youngster. Steinbrenner said the final decision will made by ownership, but Cashman's opinion is significant.

"He is the general manager, and he has the right to talk me out of it and he has talked me out of some things," Steinbrenner said.

Cashman also said Saturday that "it's difficult" to see former Yankees pitcher Roger Clemens among five people asked Friday to testify before a House panel looking into the Mitchell Report on drugs in baseball. Clemens' former trainer, Brian McNamee, said in the Mitchell Report that he injected Clemens with steroids in 1998 when Clemens was with Toronto and with steroids and human growth hormone in 2000 and 2001 while with New York. Clemens has denied the allegations.

"Hopefully, at the end of the day, everybody involved will allow us to get to a higher playing field for everybody," Cashman said. "Clearly, what this game is going through right now, and you read about it, it's obviously disheartening."

Epstein steered away from commenting on the Mitchell Report.

"That's not what I'm thinking about right now," he said. "I'm thinking about spring training, five, six weeks away, getting back out on the field where the game is played and enjoyed. And our fans have a lot to look forward to
.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:07 am

Newsday Wallace Matthews- McNamee's attorney: Baloney

http://www.newsday.com/sports/baseball/yankees/ny-sprogerside0107,0,3258803.story

Roger Clemens may have done himself one bit of good in his "60 Minutes" interview last night. A lawyer for Brian McNamee, Clemens' accuser, says it is less likely that McNamee will bring a lawsuit against Clemens for defamation.

"If what the defendant says is not believable, then in a legal sense, it is hard to show damages," Emery said. "And nothing Clemens said [last night] was believable. I can't imagine how any lawyer would allow his client to go on '60 Minutes' and lie like that. This interview is going to cause him no end of troubles."


Buster Olney says -

http://insider.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=3184697&name=olney_buster
One thing Clemens can't change

But that won't change this fact: His name is printed in the Mitchell report, forever.


You assume that Clemens will follow up and take every opportunity to say, again and again, that he did not use steroids. The defamation suit presumably will require him to sit through depositions, to answer questions from McNamee's lawyers as part of discovery. Perhaps a jury will decide, in the end, that it believes Clemens and give him a victory in a defamation suit.

That won't change this fact: His name is part of the Mitchell report.

We cannot be naïve; it may well be that everyone named within the report is guilty. But as a model for due process, the way the Mitchell investigation was conducted was horrific, something better suited for former Senator Joseph McCarthy than former Senator George Mitchell.

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Notes From Hot Stove, Cool Music: Cashman, Santana, Varitek

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:12 am

Notes From Hot Stove, Cool Music: Cashman, Santana, Varitek


http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/

A few interesting tidbits came about via the Hot Stove, Cool Music charitable event on Saturday. The Boston Herald's Rob Bradford has the details.

* Brian Cashman admitted that he lost some power when the Hank and Hal regime took over. He no longer has full authority to run everything, a sticking point when he signed on several years ago. It would not be shocking to see Cashman move on when his term ends after the 2008 season. He's finishing up a three-year, $5.4MM deal.
* For what it's worth, Theo Epstein seemed to indicate that the dragging Johan Santana talks are not holding up other moves for the Red Sox. But really it's hard to believe that Coco Crisp's situation hasn't been delayed. Boston already lost the White Sox as a suitor, most likely.
* During Spring Training, Scott Boras plans to begin contract extension talks with the Red Sox for Jason Varitek. Here's a look at other free agent backstops the Sox could consider after the '08 season. Kenji Johjima could be an interesting signing.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:12 am



A point was made on another site that Kei Igawa has entered the discussions as the 4th player in a Johan deal from the Yankees.

At first glance, this would be a throw-away news story... who in their right mind would be interested in Kei Igawa?

and we all know that Kei Igawa was horrendous in NY last year; but he could be at least a serviceable 4/5 starter for most teams around the league.

But, what got my attention, was that Minnesota would be interested in taking Igawa and his salary. Even though his posting fee was upwards of $25 million, he is only getting a base salary around $5 per season.

Cashman and Hal Steinbrenner have reportedly said they are very hesitant to take on Johan's expected contract if they can not move any salary from the current roster. But, if the Twins agreed to take on Igawa's salary, now you're starting to find a compromise between the Twins and Yankees, as well as between Cashman and Hal with Hank Steinbrenner and others in the organization.

this would signal to me that the Twins think Hughes is the prime prospect to get back, not Lester or Ellsbury or some crazy 6-for-1 package with Gomez, FMart and Mulvey. If the Twins agree to take on some salary in return, they are ultimately guaranteeing the player they want in return.

maybe looking into this too much? probably... but its at least a new thought to throw out there...

Posted by: TurnTwo | January 07, 2008 at 07:58 AM

I think Cashman would be a great GM for a smaller market team. The guy drafts amazingly well and without owners telling him what and what not to do I think he'd do well.

Posted by: Dev0 | January 07, 2008 at 08:03 AM

"The guy drafts amazingly well..."

Aaaaah the ignorance. For all you know, Cashman has nothing to do with the draft.

Baseball fans might be the dumbest group of people on earth.

Posted by: bsox21 | January 07, 2008 at 08:17 AM

It is much easier to draft well when you have the Ca$h to sign players other teams want, but alas cannot afford. That being said, I think Ca$hman has done a nice job. I can't believe you think that he has nothing to do with the players the Yankees draft bsox21. He's the GM of the team and I'm pretty sure he has a vested interest in who the Yankees take in the draft.

Posted by: grandmasterb | January 07, 2

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:13 am

One thing Clemens can't change
posted: Monday, January 7, 2008 | Feedback | Print Entry
filed under: MLB

Roger Clemens filed a defamation suit against Brian McNamee, writes Mary Flood and David Barron, just before "60 Minutes" aired in Houston.

But that won't change this fact: Roger Clemens' name is in the Mitchell report.

Clemens denied the charges on his Web site. He denied the charges in his interview with Mike Wallace. He presumably will again deny any steroid use when he meets with reporters Monday afternoon.

But that won't change this fact: His name is printed in the Mitchell report, forever.

Clemens presumably will go to Washington next week and testify before Congress, because to not accept the invitation to testify, at this point, would be tantamount, in the court of public opinion, to admitting guilt. Under oath, he presumably will testify that what McNamee said is completely false.

But that won't change this fact: His name is part of the Mitchell report, for ever and ever.

You assume that Clemens will follow up and take every opportunity to say, again and again, that he did not use steroids. The defamation suit presumably will require him to sit through depositions, to answer questions from McNamee's lawyers as part of discovery. Perhaps a jury will decide, in the end, that it believes Clemens and give him a victory in a defamation suit.

That won't change this fact: His name is part of the Mitchell report.

Clemens said something at the end of his "60 Minutes" interview that resonated: He will do everything he can to prove the charges are wrong, and that may still not be enough.

And Clemens is probably right. There is nothing that he can say or do that can change the reality that his name is in the Mitchell report, and his reputation is damaged forever. But he has chosen to fight the accusations, in a battle that he probably can never achieve complete success, and the stakes will continue to go up, day by day.

Brian McNamee's attorney thought Clemens was unbelievable in his interview, writes Wallace Matthews. Dave Krieger thought Clemens and Mike Wallace failed to deliver.

• A recurring question is why Clemens or any other player named in the report simply didn't come forward and meet with Mitchell investigators, once they were asked to do so. Part of the reason was uncertainty about what they were going to be asked, and uncertainty about what George Mitchell's version of due process was going to be.

Two days before the Mitchell report was released, a veteran agent described the concern: "Imagine if you got a summons to appear in court next Tuesday, but nobody would tell you why. Nobody would tell you what the charges are, nobody will tell you anything about the evidence being presented, and nobody will tell you who the witnesses are. When you have a case in court, there is a time of discovery so you can prepare a case. There was nothing like that, in any way, with the Mitchell people."

And Clemens indicated in the "60 Minutes" interview, in a roundabout way, that this was his experience. His agent told the Houston Chronicle, during the player's first interview with a newspaper, that Clemens was informed by Mitchell investigators only that they wanted to ask him about incidents in 1998, 2000 and 2001. Yes, he had been contacted by the Mitchell investigators, but he apparently never learned anything about Brian McNamee's cooperation with investigators until the day the report came out. For all Clemens knew, the Mitchell investigators wanted to ask him about the Los Angeles Times report that proved to be erroneous, or about what Jose Canseco wrote in his book regarding Clemens. If, in fact, Clemens was never informed along he way that Brian McNamee had alleged he had injected the pitcher with steroids, that is appalling.

Even if Clemens had met with Mitchell investigators and issued the same flat denials that he gave to Mike Wallace, there is no guarantee he would have escaped the Mitchell report. There are examples of players within the report who denied what was alleged by former Mets batboy Kirk Radomski, and yet they are still mentioned within the report.

We cannot be naïve; it may well be that everyone named within the report is guilty. But as a model for due process, the way the Mitchell investigation was conducted was horrific, something better suited for former Senator Joseph McCarthy than former Senator George Mitchell.

• Clemens now needs to tell the same story to Congress that he told to Mike Wallace, writes Mike Lupica. George Vecsey found Clemens to be unconvincing.

Richard Justice explains why Clemens is not getting the benefit of the doubt. Clemens failed to make his case, writes Phil Rogers. Dan Shaughnessy thinks Clemens looked dirty. Clemens' denials left us hanging, writes Peter Schmuck.

Within this piece, Mike Boddicker says he's seen Clemens injected with vitamin B-12.

PED Free Zone
• Brian Cashman says his job has changed, now that Hank and Hal Steinbrenner have taken over the Yankees, as Howard Ulman writes.

• Matt Capps and the Pirates are talking about a long-term deal, writes Dejan Kovacevic. Pirates pitching coach Jeff Andrews is beginning to prepare his staff.

• The Rangers finished their deal with Ben Broussard.

• The Rays are asking for ideas on how to augment their proposed ballpark. Tampa Bay signed a veteran backup catcher, writes Marc Topkin.

• Matt Clement tells Joe Strauss he's in a cool situation, in St. Louis.

• Cameron Maybin had an incredible 2007 season, as Keith Jarrett writes.

• Oakland players are wondering: OK, who's going to be the next player to be traded?

• The Marlins signed Jorge Cantu.

• The Rockies signed Josh Towers.

• Years of Hall of Fame snubs have hurt Andre Dawson, writes Dan Le Batard. Jim Rice belongs in the Hall, writes Tony Massarotti.

• Vanderbilt will open an athletics' Hall of Fame, and the first class will include 10 to 15.

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Why the Pagan acquisition matters

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:20 am

Why the Pagan acquisition matters



I have read several posts now speculating whether the Twins would want Pagan. This is ridiculous. If Minny wanted Pagan, they could have traded 2 of their own garbage prospects for him, it's not like the Mets got a hot prospect here. No- what I take from this trade is one thing - Omar is stockpiling MLB-ready OF depth for his own internal needs. Word is that the Twins are still asking (in what will be a futile effort) for Jose Reyes, but that as ST approaches, talks might turn more to a package including Fernando and Gomez. Obviously, with Milledge already gone, a trade of both Fernando and Gomez would decimate our prospect depth, but it would also deplete our bench of minor leaguers who could potentially step in at OF if Moises Alou, Endy Chavez or others go on the DL again (especially now that Ben Johnson is no longer with the team). Pagan looks like insurance in this regard if Omar needs to deal both young outfielders to get Santana. Pagan is nothing to get all excited about, but he is a young guy who can start in AAA and step in at the MLB level if needed in the event of injury. He adds reserve OF depth behind Endy, as Marlon Anderson and Damion Easley can both play OF in a pinch, but probably not for an extended period of time.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:21 am

Will third time be the charm for Dallas Cowboys?

04:05 AM CST on Monday, January 7, 2008

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/spt/football/cowboys/stories/010708dnspocowinsider.296b435.html


IRVING – In their storied histories, the Cowboys and New York Giants have never met in the postseason.

That changes next week.

The Giants will make their second trip of the season to Texas Stadium after beating Tampa Bay, 24-14, Sunday in the wild-card round of the playoffs.

As the No. 1 seed in the NFC with a 13-3 record, the Cowboys took the weekend off, but they report to work today to begin their preparations in earnest. History is on the Cowboys' side.
Cowboys/NFL

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The last two times they were the No. 1 seed in the NFC, they won Super Bowls XXVIII and XXX. Since the NFL adopted the 12-team playoff format in 1990, the top seed in the NFC has made it to the Super Bowl 11 times.

Here's a look at three storylines entering the week as the Cowboys look to win a playoff game for the first time since 1996:

Myth or reality?

The hardest thing to do is to beat a team three times in one season – at least that's a popular notion.

The Cowboys swept the Giants by scores of 45-35 (at Texas Stadium) and 31-20 (at Giants Stadium). The last time they faced an NFC East team in the playoffs was 1998 when they beat Arizona in both regular-season meetings but lost to the Cardinals in the wild-card round. In strike-shortened 1982, the Cowboys beat Washington in their only regular season meeting but lost the NFC Championship Game.

"I don't think it bothers anyone to play in Dallas," Giants defensive end Michael Strahan said.

In six playoff games against NFC East opponents, the Cowboys are 2-4. Both wins – against Philadelphia in 1992 and '95 – came at Texas Stadium.

Romo's big days

There was something about the Giants that Tony Romo liked to see this season. In two games, he completed 35 of 52 passes for 592 yards with eight touchdown passes and just two interceptions.

In 2006, the Giants weren't as kind. In the first extended action of his career, replacing Drew Bledsoe at halftime on Oct. 23, Romo threw for 223 yards and had two touchdown passes, but he was intercepted three times, including one that was returned for a touchdown. In his first start against New York, he completed 20 of 34 passes for 257 yards and was intercepted twice, but the Cowboys won.

Giants defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo worked for years under Philadelphia coordinator Jim Johnson. The last time Romo faced the Eagles, he completed 13 of 36 passes for 214 yards, was intercepted three times and sacked four times. Spagnuolo will closely look at that game tape for any tips.

Get to the passer

Quarterbacks do not like pressure, and Eli Manning is no different.

In the first eight games of the season, Manning was sacked only eight times. In the ninth game, Manning was sacked five times by five different Cowboys.

Over the second half of the season, Manning was sacked 19 times. With center Shaun O'Hara's availability in question because of a knee injury, the Giants could be without one of their best linemen. Manning was sacked only once by the Buccaneers.

The Cowboys closed the regular season with their best three-game stretch in terms of sacks with 12 against Philadelphia (four), Carolina (five) and Washington (three). Coach Wade Phillips can dial up pressure when he wants, especially with DeMarcus Ware and Greg Ellis, who combined for 26 ½ sacks.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:24 am

uote:
Originally Posted by hatfieldms
So by using this logic they didnt want a package centered around Hughes or it would have been done as well, right?

Depends on what you read..
The tone of the reports have changed over the course of the past few weeks.
Back at the winter meetings it seemed as if the Sox were a few minor details away from getting him, at least from what the reports were. How much stock we put in any or all media reporting is of course, up to each individual.
Now I am hearing a lot of the fact that the Hughes package is the best deal, but that the Twins are always going to keep the Sox there to stoke the Yankees to surrendering more or backing off..

My opinion, which is worth no more or less than anyone else's and assumes the same very public knowledge that everyone else has, is as follows:

The Twins wants Hughes. He is the best player they are being offered and Bill Smith knows it. But the Yankees are not going quantity with Hughes and hence the reason the Twins wait. If the Yankees tossed Cabrera with Hughes and added a Horne or Kennedy oor a few other significant chips, deal would have been done by now. Yankees are not inclined to do it because they feel Hughes is a big enough piece and that other pieces should be complimetary and depth fillers.
In other words, the Yankees do not feel like they should have to give up a first round pick who is highly advanced and regarded in Kennedy along side with the best pitching prospect in baseball for the right to spend another 200 million dollars in contract and luxury tax $$.
Now as for Boston. I hear that Minnesota loves Ellsbury and that they like the Red Sox deal more because of the depth it supplies. I also call BS on that, because as with the Hughes deal above, if the reports were true and they love guys like Masterson and Lowrie and are gaga for Ellsbury or Lester and Crisp, this would also have been done.

Lastly, another reason I think the Sox are in it, mostly, to drive the Yankees away or the price up. When the Yankees were in deep according to reports to get him, so were the Sox. When the Yankees backed off and walked away from the table, all of a sudden any and all things Sox and Santana also dissappeared.
For weeks, both teams seemed like they were on planet Mars doing rock samples, there was so little news.
Then big Stein issues his statement and within hours, the reports are back out there the Twins still prefer the Sox offer and it could still get done..


I will state again, I am using the same information everyone else knows, I have no insider knowledge of anything, and my own logic to deduce my opinions.
No links, no "bobcat internal intimate knowledge". Just my own assumptions..

RedMagma

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:25 am

Notes and observations

* The Sporting News reported that the Red Sox might hit Jacoby Ellsbury near the bottom of the order instead of the leadoff spot because they do not want to run in front of David Ortiz, Manny Ramirez and Mike Lowell. The article mentioned that Dustin Pedroia is a likely candidate to lead off. I like the idea. Ellsbury has more potential as a run producer for Pedroia, who is the ultimate tablesetter. Perhaps, if he is not traded and does not lead off, Ellsbury will hit seventh behind J.D. Drew or eighth behind Jason Varitek. The latter would give the Sox two leadoff-type hitters (Ellsbury and Julio Lugo) at the bottom of the order.
* The American League Central is undoubtedly the deepest and best division in baseball. The White Sox have acquired Nick Swisher, Orlando Cabrera and Carlos Quentin to a lineup that already features Jermaine Dye, Paul Konerko and Jim Thome. The Tigers will boast Miguel Cabrera, Gary Sheffield and Magglio Ordonez in the heart of the order. The Indians return the core of their AL Central championship team. Minnesota is formidable as long as they have Johan Santana and Francisco Liriano, and they added Delmon Young, who is a better offensive threat than Torii Hunter. Even the Kansas City Royals are better, as expected under bright general manager Dayton Moore. Kansas City could surpass Minnesota if the Twins deal Santana. The bottom line is this: every AL Central team will be competitive.
* Today marked the beginning of the Red Sox rookie development program, which involves 12 prospects converging on Boston for strength and conditioning, work on fundamentals and seminars about life in the Major Leagues off the field. Clay Buchholz, Devern Hansack, Michael Bowden, Hunter Jones, Justin Masterson, Dustin Richardson, Dusty Brown, Aaron Bates, Jed Lowrie, Bubba Bell, Chris Carter and Jonathan Van Every are the participants. Though they are unheralded, Hansack, Brown and Carter could contribute at the big league level sometime in 2008. Of course, Buchholz, Bowden, Lowrie and Masterson need no introduction. Richardson, Bates, Jones and Bell are well-respected prospects. Van Every is an outfielder who has thrived, but languished, in the Indians farm system before recently signing with the Sox as a minor league free agent.

Well, gotta go. "60 Minutes" is starting, and it's time to watch Roger Clemens and his Plan B-12. Sure, Roger, Brian McNamee has a master's degree in sports science, and he does not know the difference between B-12 and testosterone.

Posted by Jeff Louderback on January 06, 2008 at 07:52 PM in Hot Stove League | Permalink | Comments (5)

RedMagma

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:08 am

Hughes has more potential than Lester, no argument there. Rating Lester as a "good #3" ceiling is laughable. He was a can't miss top of the rotation starter until he got cancer. He really shouldn't have been pitching at all last season and the fact that he was is a testament to his workethic and abilities. Near the end of the season when he was beginning to get back to full strength, we got to see the real Jon Lester. Frankly, I hope the Sox keep him because being able to have him at full strength will be very nice.

$10.5 million each of the next two years? Try 10.5 million over the next two years, making $4.75 million next season (5.75 in 09). The Twins aren't the Marlins, they don't need a $20 million payroll. They can easily afford 10.5 million over the next 2 seasons, especially after dropping Santana and Hunter. Don't kid yourself. Crisp would be the starter on more teams than not (including the Yankees), so if he's a 4th OF, than Melky is a 4 and half OF. Melky has age, salary, and a better arm to his advantage. In other words, one advantage on the field. If the Sox gave cash considerations with Crisp, which is not a crazy possibility, Melky's advantages dwindle further.

Then you factor in that Lowrie is more than ML ready, and Masterson (who might be the best piece of the package) is no more than a year off.

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Re: Redsox Fans and their Inferiority complex

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:11 am

Is Clemens Warning MLB?

http://waswatching.com/


"I was eating Vioxx like it was Skittles" - Roger Clemens, last night, on 60 Minutes

I keep thinking back to this quote from Roger Clemens...and it makes me think about Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker and what happened in 1926. Here's the story via ESPN.com -

1926 - Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker were permitted by Ban Johnson to resign from baseball near the end of the 1926 season after former pitcher Dutch Leonard charged that Cobb, Speaker and Smoky Joe Wood had joined him just before the 1919 World Series in betting on a game they all knew was fixed. Leonard presented letters and other documents to Johnson, and Johnson thought they would be so potentially damaging to baseball in the wake of the Black Sox scandal that he paid Leonard $20,000 to have them suppressed. Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis exposed the cover-up and the eventual fallout forced Johnson out his job as president of the league he had created. Cobb and Speaker vehemently denied any wrongdoing, Cobb saying that "There has never been a baseball game in my life that I played in that I knew was fixed,? and that the only games he ever bet on were two series games in 1919, when he lost $150 on games thrown by the Sox. He claimed his letters to Leonard had been misunderstood, that he was merely speaking of business investments. Landis took the case under advisement and eventually let both players remain in baseball because they had not been found guilty of fixing any game themselves. It was after this case, though, that Landis instituted the rule mandating that any player found guilty of betting on baseball would be suspended for a year and that any player found to have bet on his own team would be barred for life. Cobb later claimed that the attorneys representing him and Speaker had brokered their reinstatement by threatening to expose further scandal in baseball if the two were not cleared.

I wonder if Clemens made that "Vioxx" statement as a warming shot to baseball - in the sense of "I know just as much about your house as you claim to know about mine. And, if you're going to drag me into something, I'm taking you with me."

Do you think the guys in Washington would want to hear about how baseball teams allowed their trainers to give out pills like candy? It's possible - and, I think Clemens knows this too.

Perhaps, just perhaps, Roger is pulling a Cobb/Speaker move here to get "the man" off his case. It's possible - and, if true, not a dumb move on his part. After all, it's always about having leverage - and who has more, no?

And, if anything, in this whole thing, Clemens is showing that he's not afraid to fight back.

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