Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

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Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:10 pm

According to ESPN:

ďFor more than a month in 2001, McNamee was a suspect. However, no charges were filed. Early in the investigation, the woman lied to investigators about her reason for being at the Renaissance Vinoy hotel ó she was having an affair with another Yankees employee who was married, and didnít want to reveal that. When investigators realized this, they declined to pursue the investigation of McNamee. A few months later, the Yankees quietly let McNamee go. But Clemens and Pettitte kept using him as their personal trainer.Ē

Hardinís petition is a PR masterpiece, and it explains the rape issue as follows:

Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yankees fired him. McNamee contacted him and begged for his job back, saying that he was only trying to resuscitate the woman, and that he took the rap for someone else. Clamens, not knowing that the police concluded McNamee was lying, and giving him the benefit of the doubt, rehired him.

I wonder if Congress will get into that incident? I read somewhere that one of the things McNamee lied about was where he met the woman, and at some point they were hanging with other people in Knoblachís room. Apparently Congress called just the people involved in the McNamee allegations (wonder why?), but I wonder if they ask McNamee and/or Knoblach about that night.




Buster olney just said on espn that one of the reasons mcnamee was let go by the yankees in 2000 was because he was the subject of a rape investigation

wonderful witness you got there


olney also said he doesn't think clemens will ever get elected to the hall of fame now either

so the all time hits leader

the all time home run hitter

and the #8 all time wins leader in major league history will quite possibly never see the inside of the hall of fame

http://www.nypost.com/seven/12132007/sports/mcnamee_questioned_in_01_sexual_battery__612457.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/15/sports/baseball/15mcnamee.html?pagewanted=print

and here is a synopsis from an ESPN article:

"Despite his efforts to branch out, McNamee kept a low profile until October of 2001, when he was suddenly in the New York tabloids. According to police reports, an employee of a St. Petersburg, Fla., hotel where the Yankees were staying had noticed a man and a woman apparently having sex in the hotel pool, while another man looked on from a few feet away. All three were naked in the pool. One of the men, Charles Wonsowicz, the former St. John?s pitcher who was now the Yankees? video technician, left immediately when confronted by the employee. The other, McNamee, continued to hold on to the woman until the hotel employee asked him to leave again, according to police documents.

?You mean now?? he said. McNamee got out of the pool, leaving behind the woman, who witnesses said appeared ?out of it.? She said to the hotel employee, ?Help me,? and then McNamee pulled her out of the pool and tried to put clothes back on her.

Employees called police, and an ambulance also arrived. It turned out the woman had ingested a near fatal dose of GHB, a powerful drug used by bodybuilders, teenage ?ravers? and date rapists ? who have used it to incapacitate victims. A bottle of the GHB was found on the pool deck.

Police investigated the incident as a rape and questioned McNamee the next morning.

The report of Detective Don Crotty, who questioned McNamee, cites McNamee as lying several times during the questioning: about where he first met the woman, saying it was the hotel lobby rather than another bar, as other witnesses said; and about his whereabouts over the course of the night. McNamee didn?t mention that he was with the woman with several other Yankees players in Chuck Knoblauch?s room. He denied to police that he even knew Wonsowicz, his college teammate and fellow Yankees employee. He said Wonsowicz looked familiar, and he might be a ?green fly,? ballplayer slang for a hanger-on who looks for autographs.

For more than a month in 2001, McNamee was a suspect. However, no charges were filed. Early in the investigation, the woman lied to investigators about her reason for being at the Renaissance Vinoy hotel ? she was having an affair with another Yankees employee who was married, and didn?t want to reveal that. When investigators realized this, they declined to pursue the investigation of McNamee. A few months later, the Yankees quietly let McNamee go. But Clemens and Pettitte kept using him as their personal trainer."







January 7th, 2008 at 10:49 pm

Iím pretty sure that a few months had gone by after McNamee was fired by the Yankees for the whole rape situation and McNamee contacted Clemens and told him that he was broke and that no one would hire him because of the allegations, and then gave his side of the story which was essentially that he was covering for some other Yankees who were really responsible for the date rape drugs. Thatís when Clemens took him on as his personal trainer.

Thatís the way I understand the timeline at least.

ďThe whole rape investigation of McNamee and him lying puts a whole new spin on this. If I were McNamee, I would be really scared right now. If he loses this case, things could get rough.Ē

Not a knock on you, Go NYR - just so I make that clear.

But - people should have been bearing this in mind from the very start. This was something that I thought was fairly common knowledge about McNamee when the whole Mitchell report drama began. It doesnít have any relevance to whether Clemens is telling the truth or not, but it speaks volumes about the kind of person McNamee is. Heís a terrible ďsourceĒ to be used at the center of the whole saga. He was fired by the Yankees. He was let go by Clemens. He was facing jail time after a series of setbacks in his life. How anybody could not see this man had the motivation or guts to lie in order to save his own keister is beyond me.

Diversity jurisdiction also provides that the amount in controversy must exceed $75,000.

Interestingly, Clemensí complaint makes no mention of a dollar figure in its claim for damages. That might preclude the case being removed to federal court.

Not meeting the amount in controversy is almost never a ground to prevent removal unless itís legally impossible to recover $75,000. I canít see either side raising it as an issue.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:13 pm

According to ESPN:

ďFor more than a month in 2001, McNamee was a suspect. However, no charges were filed. Early in the investigation, the woman lied to investigators about her reason for being at the Renaissance Vinoy hotel ó she was having an affair with another Yankees employee who was married, and didnít want to reveal that. When investigators realized this, they declined to pursue the investigation of McNamee. A few months later, the Yankees quietly let McNamee go. But Clemens and Pettitte kept using him as their personal trainer.Ē

Hardinís petition is a PR masterpiece, and it explains the rape issue as follows:

Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yankees fired him. McNamee contacted him and begged for his job back, saying that he was only trying to resuscitate the woman, and that he took the rap for someone else. Clamens, not knowing that the police concluded McNamee was lying, and giving him the benefit of the doubt, rehired him.

I wonder if Congress will get into that incident? I read somewhere that one of the things McNamee lied about was where he met the woman, and at some point they were hanging with other people in Knoblachís room. Apparently Congress called just the people involved in the McNamee allegations (wonder why?), but I wonder if they ask McNamee and/or Knoblach about that night.




Buster olney just said on espn that one of the reasons mcnamee was let go by the yankees in 2000 was because he was the subject of a rape investigation

wonderful witness you got there


olney also said he doesn't think clemens will ever get elected to the hall of fame now either

so the all time hits leader

the all time home run hitter

and the #8 all time wins leader in major league history will quite possibly never see the inside of the hall of fame

http://www.nypost.com/seven/12132007/sports/mcnamee_questioned_in_01_sexual_battery__612457.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/15/sports/baseball/15mcnamee.html?pagewanted=print

and here is a synopsis from an ESPN article:

"Despite his efforts to branch out, McNamee kept a low profile until October of 2001, when he was suddenly in the New York tabloids. According to police reports, an employee of a St. Petersburg, Fla., hotel where the Yankees were staying had noticed a man and a woman apparently having sex in the hotel pool, while another man looked on from a few feet away. All three were naked in the pool. One of the men, Charles Wonsowicz, the former St. John?s pitcher who was now the Yankees? video technician, left immediately when confronted by the employee. The other, McNamee, continued to hold on to the woman until the hotel employee asked him to leave again, according to police documents.

?You mean now?? he said. McNamee got out of the pool, leaving behind the woman, who witnesses said appeared ?out of it.? She said to the hotel employee, ?Help me,? and then McNamee pulled her out of the pool and tried to put clothes back on her.

Employees called police, and an ambulance also arrived. It turned out the woman had ingested a near fatal dose of GHB, a powerful drug used by bodybuilders, teenage ?ravers? and date rapists ? who have used it to incapacitate victims. A bottle of the GHB was found on the pool deck.

Police investigated the incident as a rape and questioned McNamee the next morning.

The report of Detective Don Crotty, who questioned McNamee, cites McNamee as lying several times during the questioning: about where he first met the woman, saying it was the hotel lobby rather than another bar, as other witnesses said; and about his whereabouts over the course of the night. McNamee didn?t mention that he was with the woman with several other Yankees players in Chuck Knoblauch?s room. He denied to police that he even knew Wonsowicz, his college teammate and fellow Yankees employee. He said Wonsowicz looked familiar, and he might be a ?green fly,? ballplayer slang for a hanger-on who looks for autographs.

For more than a month in 2001, McNamee was a suspect. However, no charges were filed. Early in the investigation, the woman lied to investigators about her reason for being at the Renaissance Vinoy hotel ? she was having an affair with another Yankees employee who was married, and didn?t want to reveal that. When investigators realized this, they declined to pursue the investigation of McNamee. A few months later, the Yankees quietly let McNamee go. But Clemens and Pettitte kept using him as their personal trainer."

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:14 pm

Well, regardless if the Rocket cheated or not, Mitchell and a majority of Americans think this dirtbag is credible so strap yourselves in - because this is going to be a hell of a ride.
That's actually not true at all. I don't mind Clemens, I was always indifferent towards Boggs (but boy can he hit) and I have a Nomar jersey in my closet. And to be 100% honest, I think two of the three that are mentioned here used steroids.

Here's the way I look at this whole "Steroid Era". It's exactly that. All the numbers were skewed the same ways, no one is above it, and anyone involved in that era who says they didn't know it was happening (yes I'm talking to you Jamie Moyer) is full of shiite. WE ALL knew it was going on and it was universally accepted at the time. Once Congress got involved, we realized that chicks may dig the long ball, but the government doesn't so much.

Long story short. Assume they are all guilty, keep the records and move on. This is really much to do about nothing because in the end, nothing can change what has already happened, and short of having video taped evidence, none of this can be proven or disproven in any way.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:17 pm

From the Heynman article...

When Clemens claims to have no knowledge that Andy Pettitte - Clemens' close friend and training partner, and another former client of McNamee - had twice taken HGH, thus corroborating McNamee's testimony in the Mitchell Report, the trainer interjects, "I believe that." image

From Lawyer on Tubby's Blog...

I mentioned in an earlier thread that it sounded to my trained ear that both sides knew they were being taped and that each side was tying to get the other to say something damaging. That's why neither side sounded natural and didn't come out and directly confront the other.

McNamee was desperate to get Roger to say something along the lines of some kind of gift, money or a plane ticket, something. he kept playing the poverty card and saying "Tell me what you want me to do." Translation: "please tamper with me, offer me something or direct me to do something that helps you in some way."

Roger was throwing in the lines from his script about "I don't understand why you did it. And somebody has to tell the truth," hoping McNamee would slip up.

Before I end however, here's the $24,000 question: between Roger and McNamee, who used to earn his living making recording phone calls and face to face conversations with drug dealers and buyers? Uh, McNamee, the former NYPD NARC. Don't fall for his teary "sad dad with a sick kid" act. He's got ice water in his veins, people. He was trying to set Roger up like he used to set up drug dealers and buyers all day long.


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/08/sports/baseball/08clemens.html

McNamee's lawyer, said that McNamee lied to Clemens lawyers about being pressured by the feds.

Ward's explanation of why he says McNamee lied:

"He lied to them and tried to say, 'Well, they pressured me,' because he wanted to continue to stay in the good graces of Roger,"


My Client oh yea he lied... image That cant be a good strategy.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:23 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/08/sports/baseball/08clemens.html

McNamee's lawyer, said that McNamee lied to Clemens lawyers about being pressured by the feds.

Ward's explanation of why he says McNamee lied:

"He lied to them and tried to say, 'Well, they pressured me,' because he wanted to continue to stay in the good graces of Roger,"

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:09 am

Recording conversation latest misfire from Roger Clemens

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/yankees/2008/01/08/2008-01-08_recording_conversation_latest_misfire_fr-1.html?page=0

This wasn't "60 Minutes" now, just 17. Seventeen minutes of two desperate men on a phone call, Roger Clemens and his former trainer Brian McNamee. Clemens, as desperate as he clearly is, wasn't going to allow himself to sound that way, not with his lawyer in the room with him, not with knowing the conversation was being taped. Brian McNamee did sound desperate, and wounded, and needy and pathetic.

McNamee said a lot of things over those 17 minutes. What he never said was that he had lied to former Sen. George Mitchell or to the government about injecting Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone.

Oh, he and Roger Clemens talked and talked and swore plenty on that phone call Clemens and his lawyer Rusty Hardin played Monday before Clemens' weird press conference in Houston really began.

They talked an awful lot about how well Clemens had treated McNamee when McNamee was still working for him. They talked about McNamee's sick son, whose condition was one of the reasons McNamee reached out to Clemens in the first place, a boy who deserved better than being treated like some kind of prop yesterday as Clemens continues to use anything he can to save his reputation.

Mostly you heard McNamee, over and over, asking Clemens, "What do you want me to do?"

At no point did Clemens ever say the following: "Tell Senator Mitchell and tell the government you lied when you said you injected me with steroids and HGH."

What McNamee, who is weird enough himself to still come looking to Clemens for approval, does say at one point is, "The truth is the truth."

Clemens must have thought this conversation, which came across looking like a clumsy set-up, would somehow persuade people that he is the one telling the truth and that McNamee is the one lying here. If anything, though, this recording, as odd and rambling as it was, seemed to help McNamee more, because as needy as he sounded, he never changed his story.

There was all that time, 17 minutes, for him to admit to Clemens that he lied, that he did exactly what Clemens on "60 Minutes" said he did, which was tell this huge and terrible lie about Roger Clemens, give Clemens up to the government, to save himself.

Only McNamee never did.

It does not prove that he is some great truth-teller here, the one you should believe. Still: If you watched the whole thing yesterday, you know that Clemens didn't help himself much, from the time he began his own part of this day by invoking the death in the family of a former coach. It was as relevant to these staged proceedings as the mentions of McNamee's son.

"If (Clemens) wants to play that game, he's going to get buried," Richard Emery, one of McNamee's lawyers, said last night. "I have no compunction about putting him in jail. This is war."

That is all part of a continuing war of words between the lawyers on both sides. But you keep coming back to this: That out of all the words we heard yesterday, the back and forth between Clemens and McNamee, here are the ones we didn't hear from McNamee, that he lied.

This tape and this press conference were supposed to settle a lot and did not. All that was confirmed is that every time Clemens steps in front of the public these days, he doesn't seem to help himself very much. Once he did start taking questions yesterday - he is the one who called this press conference and still made the job of answering questions seem like a nuisance - he really did sound as desperate as McNamee, even as he tried to cowboy everything up, up to and including when he said he didn't give a "rat's ass" about the Hall of Fame.

He wants us to believe that he didn't take steroids or HGH, but will take a shot from trainers like Brian McNamee every time his back or shoulder is sore. Wants us to believe he'll take any drug to pitch, but draws the line at steroids. Has all this outrage about being accused of being a juicer, can't bring himself to call other juicers - even now, in the age of drug testing - cheaters.

Mike Wallace asks on Sunday night if Brian McNamee told him what he was going to say to Sen. Mitchell and Clemens said, "Didn't tell me a word."

And hold on.

McNamee didn't tell Clemens directly, but he sure told representatives of the Hendricks brothers eight days before the Mitchell report came out that he, McNamee, had told Mitchell about giving Clemens performance-enhancing drugs.

"If I would have known what this man, Brian McNamee, had said in that report, I would have been down there in a heartbeat to take care of it," Clemens tells Wallace.

Come on. Clemens might not have known what was going to be in that report, but he sure knew what Mitchell had. And didn't lift a finger to change Mitchell's mind. Under the advice of the same affable lawyer - Hardin - who hosted yesterday's show.

Hardin, desperate himself yesterday - but just to be liked - introduced that audiotape like this was some sort of reality show. Maybe it is one now. A bad reality show like the one coming on Fox, where they actually do hook up contestants to a lie detector. A bad show with two desperate stars, one a trainer and one with 354 victories in the big leagues.

But after another appearance that won Roger Clemens nothing except more questions, here is one last question to add to the list: If he can't do better than this with an interview show and his own press conference, how does he think he's going to do in front of Congress?

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:11 am

'Cold War' allegation makes George Mitchell hot under collar


http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/yankees/2008/01/08/2008-01-08_cold_war_allegation_makes_george_mitchel.html



BY TERI THOMPSON AND MICHAEL O'KEEFFE
DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITERS

Tuesday, January 8th 2008, 4:00 AM

In the defamation lawsuit that Roger Clemens filed Sunday night, he describes George Mitchell's interviews with Brian McNamee on the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball as being conducted like a "Cold War era interrogation."

Mitchell, the former Senate Majority Leader who authored a report on drug use in Major League Baseball that included information from McNamee that he injected Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone at least 16 times in 1998, 2000 and 2001, refuted that characterization Monday night.

"The allegation made by Roger Clemens in his lawsuit that the 'interview was conducted like a Cold War interrogation, in which a federal agent merely read to the Mitchell investigators McNamee's previously-obtained statement and then asked McNamee to confirm what he previously stated' is untrue," Mitchell said. "As the report explains, I interviewed Brian McNamee three times, in July, October and December 2007. McNamee's lawyer Earl Ward participated in all three of those interviews, as did federal law enforcement officials and members of my investigative staff.

"At the outset of each of the interviews, the federal law enforcement officials told McNamee that he should just tell the truth and warned him that he faced criminal jeopardy if he made any false statements. Also at each of the interviews, I told him that all I asked of him was the truth, nothing more and nothing less. He said that he understood and would comply."

Mitchell went on to say that the first interview with McNamee was conducted in person at Mitchell's office in New York. "During that interview, which lasted about 21/2 hours, I asked most of the questions, which concerned Mr. McNamee's knowledge of the possession or use of performance-enhancing substances by players in Major League Baseball," Mitchell said. "Occasionally, members of my investigative staff or some of the federal law enforcement officials who were present asked questions or sought clarification. There was no 'Cold War era' reading of McNamee's prior statements by any federal official, as alleged."

According to Mitchell, the second interview of McNamee was conducted by telephone in October. "In order to ensure that we had correctly understood his recollection of events, members of my investigative staff and I reviewed with McNamee what he had told us during his first interview," he said. "We asked for clarification of some points, and we also asked him some follow-up questions. Again, there was no 'Cold War era' reading of McNamee's prior statements by any federal official, as alleged."

Mitchell's staff contacted McNamee again in early December, shortly before his report was published. "We contacted McNamee again and conducted a third interview by telephone," he said. "The purpose of this interview was to make absolutely certain that we had accurately understood and characterized his statements to us. ...

"At the conclusion of the interview, we reminded McNamee that all we wanted from him was the truth. We asked if he was completely comfortable with the truth and accuracy of his statements which would be included in the report, and he said that he was."

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:12 am

After Mitchell Report, MLB beefs up security plan for clubhouses


http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/2008/01/08/2008-01-08_after_mitchell_report_mlb_beefs_up_secur-2.html


BY JOHN HARPER
DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER

Tuesday, January 8th 2008, 4:00 AM

Major League Baseball has taken its first public steps in response to the Mitchell Report, announcing Monday that it is implementing new measures to tighten security in and around baseball clubhouses.

Essentially the measures are designed to prevent another Kirk Radomski from taking root in a position of easy access to major league ballplayers.

Radomski, the former Mets clubhouse attendant who provided ballplayers with performance-enhancing drugs, was a key figure in George Mitchell's investigation and report that detailed widespread use of steroids in baseball over the last decade or so.

Saying it was acting on recommendations Mitchell made in his report, MLB announced a series of measures that will be "universally enforced" this season.

# Background checks will be performed on all existing clubhouse personnel and new hires.

# Random drug tests will be performed on all clubhouse personnel.

# Clubs will be required to maintain a log of all packages sent to clubhouses at major league ballparks.

# Clubs will be required to distribute Major League Baseball's policy of "disclosing information relating to the use, possession or distribution of prohibited substances" to all club employees and to post the policy in the clubhouse.

# The overnight notice to clubs before the arrival of the Comprehensive Drug Testing personnel has been eliminated. All clubs will be required to have a single, designated area for collections in both the home and visiting clubhouses. Collectors will be provided with permanent, official credentials and their access will be facilitated.

In addition to creating a more secure clubhouse, these measures are obviously also designed to enhance MLB's drug-testing program. By eliminating what amounted to 24-hour notice that drug testers were coming, MLB is reducing the chances for players to prepare in any way for random tests.

And by creating logs for packages sent to clubhouses, the stories of players receiving HGH shipments, which became numerous even before the Mitchell Report was released, aren't likely to be repeated.

In its news release announcing the changes, MLB points out that these changes are the latest in a "continuing effort" to increase clubhouse security. In recent years MLB has banned personal trainers from clubhouses and limited access to vendors, while requiring clubs to keep logs of all clubhouses visitors, with the exception of members of the Baseball Writers of America.

"These security and logistical changes are important additional steps in combating the illegal use of performance-enhancing substances," commissioner Bud Selig said in the statement. "Major League Baseball is pleased to act on the recommendations of Senator Mitchell as part of its ongoing clubhouse security procedures. Major League Baseball will soon be announcing additional changes based on the recommendations made by Senator Mitchell."

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:14 am

ROCKET SCIENCE: ESCAPE WITH TAPE
CLEMENS HOPES CALL SWAYS PUBLIC OPINION


http://www.nypost.com/seven/01082008/sports/yankees/rocketscience__escape_with_tape_840177.htm?page=0



January 8, 2008 -- HOUSTON - Think of it as Law & Order: HGH.

Roger Clemens dropped a bomb straight out of a TV crime drama yesterday, playing a surreptitiously recorded audio tape of a phone conversation he had with his former trainer Brian McNamee, who accused the pitcher of using steroids and human growth hormone.

The 17-minute phone call occurred on Friday and Clemens played the tape for reporters at a news conference here. A defiant Clemens showed little emotion as the tape played of a clearly distraught McNamee offering to do anything Clemens asks.

"I'll go to jail, I'll do whatever you want," McNamee said.

"I need somebody to tell the truth," Clemens said.

Clemens and his lawyer played the tape hoping it would sway public opinion and convince people McNamee lied when he told former Senator George Mitchell he had injected Clemens with performance-enhancing drugs.

The call was recorded while Clemens sat at his home with his attorneys. It appears McNamee did not know he was being taped but thought it was possible.

During the call, initiated by a text message from McNamee last week, Clemens remained calm and, per his lawyer's instructions, did not push McNamee too far. Rusty Hardin, Clemens' lawyer, said they were afraid a court might see the tape as tampering with a witness if Clemens led McNamee too much.

After the tape was played, Clemens made his feelings toward McNamee during the call clear.

"I was angry," Clemens said. "I would love for him to come down here but I would be afraid for him."

Clemens remained defiant during the news conference held in a room at a downtown convention center. Wearing a royal blue shirt and black pants, the former Yankee clearly showed his anger at having to defend himself. At one point, his lawyer slid a note onto the podium that said, "lighten up." Clemens gave it back to him and said, "It's hard." He expressed disgust with reporters for the way the story has been reported and stormed off abruptly.

"I made a statement through (Hardin) when it first happened," he said before storming off. "I made a statement through my foundation, that wasn't good enough. Now I'm here doing this. I cannot wait to go into the private sector and hope to never have to answer it again. I've said enough."

The news conference was the latest leg in Clemens' public defense against the Mitchell Report. He filed a defamation suit late Sunday against McNamee, and yesterday afternoon he accepted the invitation of Congressional panel to testify on Jan. 16. McNamee's lawyers said he would appear also.

The playing of the 17-minute tape was the most dramatic moment of the day. Clemens repeatedly said he wanted someone to tell the truth and McNamee kept saying "tell me what you want me to do." McNamee told Clemens his child was sick because of the controversy and he was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no money. McNamee's attorney ripped Clemens last night.

"Clemens disgraced himself by using Brian's sick child to perpetuate his fraud on the public," said Richard Emery, who represents McNamee.

During the tape, McNamee never said he lied to Mitchell but he also never responds to Clemens' pleas to tell the truth by saying he already did. The trainer clearly wanted to get back in Clemens' good graces in the call.

"I'm with you," McNamee said. "I'm in your corner, but I'd also like to not go to jail."

Hardin said he would never let a client take a lie-detector test. He revealed at the press conference that Clemens' representatives first found out McNamee had talked to Mitchell eight days before the report was released when McNamee contacted someone who works for Clemens' agents, contradicting Clemens' claim he had no idea until the Mitchell Report was made public.

Clemens hired Hardin and met with him four days before the report was released. Hardin hired two private investigators, who McNamee agreed to talk to the day before the Mitchell Report came out. They said McNamee told them everything he told Mitchell, but Clemens' team held out hope Mitchell might not name Clemens in the report.

brian.costello@nypost.com

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:22 am

M's, Reds still interested in O's Bedard

http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/7650072?CMP=OTC-K9B140813162&ATT=49

Andy MacPhail, the Orioles' president of baseball operations, left his options open when he said last month that there was a "strong likelihood" the team would not trade left-hander Erik Bedard.


Smart move.


The Mariners are continuing their aggressive pursuit of Bedard, major-league sources say, and there are growing indications that the teams could be moving closer to a deal.

The Reds also remain interested in Bedard, but the Mariners are willing to trade their top outfield prospect, Adam Jones, while the Reds will not part with their best minor-league outfielder, Jay Bruce.

For the Orioles, the final approval for a Bedard deal would rest with owner Peter Angelos, who has long resisted trading veterans for prospects but hired MacPhail last June with the understanding that the team needed a new direction.

The Orioles' trade of shortstop Miguel Tejada to the Astros for five younger players in December signaled that Angelos might finally be willing to endure a lengthy rebuilding process.

But Bedard, a homegrown product, has greater sentimental value for the Orioles than Tejada ó and trading him likely would lead to a separate deal involving second baseman Brian Roberts, an Angelos favorite.

Without Bedard, who went 13-5 with a 3.16 ERA last season and set a franchise record with 221 strikeouts, there would be little reason for the Orioles to keep Roberts, who also is two years away from free agency.

The Cubs remain the most likely fit for Roberts. The Mets made a strong run at Bedard at the general managers' meetings in November. The Indians, who have explored trades for impact players all off-season, like both Roberts and Bedard.

Perhaps the Indians could land one of the Orioles' stars, but it is highly unlikely that they could put together a blockbuster to obtain both, the way the Tigers did in acquiring third baseman Miguel Cabrera and left-hander Dontrelle Willis from the Marlins.

Mariners GM Bill Bavasi has said it is unlikely that he will trade his top pitching prospect, right-hander Brandon Morrow. But even if the M's decline to part with Morrow, they can put together an attractive package for Bedard.

Jones, compared by some scouts to Torii Hunter, would become the Orioles' long-term answer in center field, developing alongside right fielder Nick Markakis.

The Mariners also are willing to include catcher Jeff Clement and third baseman Matt Tuiasosopo, sources say. The Orioles, however, might prefer a choice of left-hander Tony Butler, right-hander Chris Tillman and 17-year-old shortstop Carlos Triunfel.

The A's strong returns for right-hander Dan Haren and outfielder Nick Swisher in recent trades seemingly has increased the Orioles' leverage. The addition of Bedard, meanwhile, would give the Mariners a potentially dynamic rotation to compete with the Angels in the American League West.

The M's recently signed free-agent right-hander Carlos Silva, and righty Felix Hernandez, lefty Jarrod Washburn and right Miguel Batista are their returning starters. Morrow is a candidate for either the rotation or the bullpen.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:23 am

Cubs, Indians Interested In Roberts

Ken Rosenthal is back with a bang, penning a new article about Erik Bedard and Brian Roberts trade possibilities. We already updated you on the Bedard situation over yonder.

Rosenthal says the Cubs are still the best fit for Roberts, also noting interest from the Mets and Indians. Last we heard, the Cubs' offer included Sean Gallagher and Matt Murton but not Rich Hill or Felix Pie. Ronny Cedeno, Sean Marshall, and Donnie Veal could also be in the mix.

Interesting to hear that the Tribe is quietly taking a look at both Roberts and Bedard, just as they were quietly players for Dan Haren. Bedard could fill the void if C.C. Sabathia were to leave via free agency. What would a Roberts acquisition mean? Asdrubal Cabrera to short, Jhonny Peralta to third or traded

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:24 am

Erik Bedard Rumors: Mariners, Reds, Indians


http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/


Erik Bedard staying put in Baltimore this winter? Maybe not. Ken Rosenthal and Jason Churchill both busted out brand new material this evening with the latest Bedard chatter. The upshot is that the Mariners seem to have a decent shot at him.

* Rosenthal says the Mariners will put Adam Jones, Jeff Clement, and Matt Tuiasosopo in the deal. He indicates that the Orioles could push to substitute and get one of Tony Butler, Chris Tillman, and Carlos Triunfel. Looks like Bill Bavasi is sticking to the idea of keeping Brandon Morrow. Rosenthal hedges his bets, but admits to "growing indications that the teams could be moving closer to a deal."
* Churchill says something similar: the Mariners and Orioles "may very well be making significant progress." Churchill sees a package of Jones, Triunfel, and George Sherrill as the likely scenario.
* Baseball Prospectus' Kevin Goldstein recently listed his Top 11 Prospects for the Mariners. Clement was a five-star, Tillman and Triunfel four-stars, Butler a two-star, and Tuiasosopo an honorable mention. Jones would be first were he still considered a prospect.
* Both Ohio teams have interest in Bedard as well, but a trade to the Indians or Reds seems less likely. The Reds still won't give up Jay Bruce.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:26 am

Mís Getting Closer in acquiring for Bedard?

http://prospectinsider.com/2008/01/07/ms-getting-closer/

I have it on pretty good authority that the Seattle Mariners and Baltimore Orioles may very well be making significant progress on a trade involving left-hander Erik Bedard.

Unfortunately, if you are an Mís fan, the word is that the Mariners may agree to include Carlos Triunfel in a deal along with Adam Jones, and perhaps one other player (George Sherrill, most likely), due to their stance on trading Brandon Morrow.

I did not get this info from a source directly involved in the talks, but it was relayed to me through a mutual source of one more directly involved.

If the Mariners send Jones, Triunfel and Sherrill to Baltimore and the return is simply Erik Bedard without Brian Roberts or other valuable pieces, the Soriano-Ramirez trade will be buried by this monster of a mistake.

Protecting Morrow as if heís a sure thing is ridiculous. Refusing to include him in the deal as if heís got a good chance to be a frontline starter in 2008 is irresponsible.

But, what else is new? This is not a smart baseball team and this would be yet another blunder as they continue to believe they were an 88-win team last year and are building on the team as a result.

Updates coming as I get them, and Iím already making calls to scouts to get reactions to such a deal, should it go through.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:28 am

Mariners And O's "Closer" On Bedard


FOXSports.com's Ken Rosenthal says there are indications the Orioles and Mariners are closer to terms on an Erik Bedard deal.
Rosenthal believes the Mariners are willing to give up Adam Jones, Jeff Clement and third baseman Marquis Tuiasosopo for Bedard. The Orioles, though, could prefer Tony Butler, Chris Tillman or Carlos Triunfel as the third player. The two pitchers might be put on the table, but we doubt the Mariners would part with Triunfel, probably not even if Clement were taken out of the deal. Clement would likely move to first base if sent to Baltimore. Some believe it's where he belongs anyway.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:33 am

Pinch hitting: The Baseball Outsider

http://yankees.lhblogs.com/2008/01/08/pinch-hitting-the-baseball-outsider/#comments


January is usually a slow month for baseball news. So weíve lined up a series of guest bloggers to entertain you. Next up is Jay from The Baseball Outsider.

Jay has been a reader here for a long time. I had a chance to meet him during spring training last year while he was watching batting practice on one of the side fields. So you know heís a good fan. Jay is a 29-year-old IT guy from New Jersey. He has season tickets and says he spends most of his summer weekends in the Bronx with his wife.

Hereís Jayís post:

Alex Rodriguez is the most important Yankee. I bet you disagree with me, but itís true. Alex is the most important part of the Yanks present and future. He holds in his hand the very future of this team, and does so more than any other player on that team. His contract, which was the largest in the history of the major leagues, also makes him the player with the longest contract in the league. The move by management has changed the face of this team for the future. While the hearts of the fans may belong to Derek Jeter, the team belongs to Alex Rodriguez.

If Alex remains productive at a rate of 38 home runs per year till age 42 he has the potential of hitting 898 home runs in total. Think about that, 898 home runs. Even if his production falls to average only 30 home runs per year, he would still hit a total of 818 home runs. That would blow Barry Bondsís record away. This is what baseball wants, and most of all this is what the Yankees want.

When I went to AT&T Park this past season to see a game while I was working in Northern California, I was absolutely amazed by the shrine it was to Bonds. His image could be found everywhere from the scoreboard to the ground you walk on outside of the stadium. A perfect marketing plan for the imperfect personality. The team managed to identify everything with GiantsbBaseball with Barry Bonds. Regardless of your opinion and the truth of his performance enhancing drug use, the marketing aspect of how Bonds was presented by the Giants was remarkable. I have to believe that this was the thought process of the Yankee front office. It was even made public when the Yankees announced the marketing deal in place to celebrate Alexís milestone home runs and the bonus money to be made.

While keeping Alex Rodriguez in pinstripes might have been a good for on the field, it was a better deal off the field. During the season I met up with someone at the Stadium and discussed the possibility of Alex remaining with the Yankees in 2008. He said, ďAre you kidding me, that place they are building across the street is a cash machine. You think of how much money they are going to make, keeping him here is just good business.Ē

How can you disagree? He brings star power, he brings the long ball and of course he brings the drama off the field which our local media loves. Heís rich, heís good-looking and has an alleged wandering eye. Heís what the daily papers in New York absolutely love, someone to keep them writing about. Reggie was the guy in the 70s. Then in the 80s it was George and his meddling and Donnie Baseball. The 90s had Clueless Joe and his Boy Wonder Jeter. But the future will be based on A-Rod and his every move, much like itís been already.

This new contract will be to blame for every failure. The pressure from the $252 million contract must have been maddening, but the $275 contract million Ö woah, I canít even fathom how the tabloids will treat him when he is in slumps with that contract:

ď$275M STRIKE OUTĒ
ďA-ROD FAIL$Ö AGAINĒ
ďWAS HE WORTH IT?Ē

Itís what the big papers love, a guy they can hope every day will give them a back page that someone will take interest in.

Alex is here to stay. Iíll be happy to see him break the records, hit milestones and eventually go into the Hall with the interlocking NY on his hat. Heíll get his ring, heíll get his money and heíll get our hearts because itís his team Ö you just havenít realized it yet.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:33 am

1. Peter Abraham January 8th, 2008 at 12:38 am

Thanks for the post, Jay. Hope to see you down in Tampa.
2. MackNova January 8th, 2008 at 12:39 am

As long as Jeterís on the team, I donít know if it really can be ARodís team. Too many people view a rift between ARod and Jeter, and until this team wins a championship, people will continue to view ARod as the hired gun and Jeter as the winner.
3. Buddy Biancalana January 8th, 2008 at 12:49 am

Nice piece Jay, but not sure about the rip into Torre referring to him as Clueless Joe.
4. KA January 8th, 2008 at 12:54 am

good piece Jay and I donít think he was ripping JoeÖthats the way things were expressed about to some extent I think. I could be wrong.
5. SAndman January 8th, 2008 at 12:54 am

.

A-Rod just needs good Starting pitching to make that dream.A-Rod came in 2004 the same time we havenít had one truce Ace pitcher.Not Chien-Ming ď199 hits in 199 innings Wang or Andy 4 Era HGH Pettitte.

If we can have Joba Chamberlain or Santana as our Ace then A-Rod will be better then Jeter.Until then no the true way to win championships is Starting pitchingÖsomething we donít have.

But Good post Jay.
6. Ed FL January 8th, 2008 at 12:56 am

Jay, nicepost.youíreright. This is A-Rodís team. This team is going to revolve around Alex, not Jeter. I love Jeter but Alex is the Man nowdays.
7. Clare January 8th, 2008 at 1:00 am

Jay,

I completely agree. After ARod, the next biggest media draws will be Joba and Phil, especially if theyíre as good as we all hope. Can you see two young, single, (hopefully) great pitchers on the loose in New York? I have the feeling that they were relatively demure and well-behaved as rookies, but after a good season or two, who knows?

There is an upside to the rest of the team with ARod sucking all the air out of the room (although they may not see it that way). And that is the rest of the team gets to float below the radar. Nobodyís slumps get that much attention, no oneís off-field life will get the scrutiny it would otherwise.

I have a feeling Jeter wouldnít have been too unhappy to see ARod leave. Aside from any personal feelings he might have towards him, I think he knows heíll never be the top story again. Sure, til ARod gets his ring, Jeter will still have the moral high ground. And, ARod will almost certainly always have 4 less rings than Jeter. But Jeter will never be the center of attention in New York again.
8. Philo Farnsworth January 8th, 2008 at 1:13 am

Good post, and I basically agree with it, but Iím wonder whether itís such a good idea for the Yankee organization to put so much weight on one player. Remember, the Yankee dynasty of 1996-2001 didnít really have one dominant star. Sure, those teams had loads of talent, but the burden of winning was always shared among a number of players (OíNeil, Bernie, Tino, Jeter, etc.). I worry that the Yanks are putting too much of a burden on Arod.
9. mel January 8th, 2008 at 1:13 am

Interesting take. You either like Alex or not. Iím of the latter, but I cheer for all the Yankees. He always put up a wall around himself, but if he can break down those barriers and become a man of the people then heíll win me over. He got off to a good start, by dumping on his master/servant. Maybe as this becomes ďhisĒ team, heíll grow more comfortable.

One thingís for sure. Weíll still be cheering for him 10 years from now (Iím assuming thereís no opt-out clause) and others will come and go. Others that will be more popular with the fans and take a part of our hearts when they leave. But Alex will be the franchise player, whether you like him or not. Just like Barry Bonds.
10. Clare January 8th, 2008 at 1:25 am

mel,

I really donít think any multi-millionaire athlete will ever be a ďman of the people.Ē And why should we expect them to?

All I want from the players on the team I root for is to play hard every day, publicly support their teammates, and avoid breaking the law. I donít expect them to be role models, smooth public speakers, or shining examples of humanity. A public sense of humor would be nice, and some charity work much appreciated, but thatís just a bonus.

I donít think we ever really know what type of person they are. All we know about them is filtered through the mediaís preconceptions (about which Iíve ranted frequently).

As for ARod, Iíve never seen him dog it on the field. Iíve never heard him say anything bad about a teammate (no, what he said about Jeter doesnít count, since it was before they were teammates). Add in that heís an amazing player, and really, what more do you want?
11. mel January 8th, 2008 at 1:41 am

Clare,

ďMan of the peopleĒ may have been the wrong phrase. I was trying to find a nice way to say ďget a personalityĒ.

But youíre right, the only thing that matters is that he plays hard.
12. Clare January 8th, 2008 at 1:50 am

Okay, Iíve taken over Rebeccaís job and killed the thread. Or maybe Iím the only one still up.

Anyway, since I canít go to bed til my laundryís done, Iíll just keep talking to myself, especially since weíre on my favorite topic.

One of my theories on ARod is that some of the problems heís had in NY stem from his initial attempt to be deferential to Jeter. I thought of this when I read Borasí book on ARod in 2000 that someone linked to a while back. In it, Boras talked about ARodís leadership qualities, and how that was important to him.

Then, he goes to NY, where, for all kinds of reasons, he feels the need to be deferential to Jeter. Itís Jeterís team, heís the captain, heís got the rings, heís Torreís favorite son. ARod was very careful (up til this year) to not step on Jeterís toes (at least not publicly).

I also read (donít remember where), that one of the reasons ARod kept quiet about the change in their friendship was because Jeter asked him to (on the plane when ARod was coming to NY for his signing press conference).

This year, ARod, I believe, stopped being so deferential. Clearly, Jeter didnít like what ARod said about their relationship in spring training. (When ARod said in his MVP press conference that ďsome people didnít likeĒ what he said, Iím sure Jeter was one of them). There were less members of the 96 team around, and more young kids who looked up to ARod. Although he never said anything publicly, he knows how Jeter didnít support him in 2006, and I think itís plausible that he stopped caring so much about Jeterís opinion as a result.

None of this is meant to bash Jeter, BTW. One of the things I hate is the tendency to build one up by bashing the other. Itís possible to like them both (which I do). However I think the situation starting in 2004 was incredibly awkward, with them sharing a position, the Esquire article, etc. Iím agnostic on the chemistry/winning debate, but I think if they had won in 2004, most of the tension goes away. Since they didnít, and then we had the whole true Yankee BS, choking in October themes, then the problems persisted, until spring training 2007. I think ARod then said to hell with it, Iím just going to say what I think and if Jeter doesnít like it, tough.
13. iYankees January 8th, 2008 at 1:50 am

Good post Jay. Iím pretty happy that A-Rod is hanging around (Öfor the next 10 years). Having a Yankee break the home run record will be a lot of fun.
14. Matt M. January 8th, 2008 at 1:54 am

Great Post.
For all of Arodís detractorís:
The man is here till 2017Öso you might as well embrace him because he isnt going anywhere.

and with how crazy the FA market has gottenÖArodís contract wont look too bad in a few years. and i fully believe that he, robbie cano. and our young pitching is shaping up to be our core for years to come
15. YANKEE BIAS January 8th, 2008 at 1:58 am

Really good post Jay.

You and Pete look related.
16. mel January 8th, 2008 at 2:01 am

Clare,

Yes, it seems like Jeter behaves like an ass towards Alex and supports others more than him. But as Jeter says, we donít see what goes on in the clubhouse. Someone posted the other day that they met Craig Wilson personally and that he said that all the Jeter/Alex stuff wasnít true.

I do see a potential for conflict if Alex tries to usurp Jeter within the club. Canít see Alex doing that. Heís finally figured out that the best way to survive and thrive in New York is to get rid of any agendas and just be himself.

As for Jeter, heís obsessed with ďone for the thumbĒ. He, like Kobe Bryant, only think about championships and it can blind them sometimes. But that obsession also makes them great, especially it really counts.
17. Bronx Liaison January 8th, 2008 at 2:07 am

Nicely done Jay.

This is one of the better prospect lists Iíve seen this offseason. Let me know what you guys think:

http://bronx-bomberz.blogspot.com/2008/01/baseball-iqs-top-15-prospects.html
18. Clare January 8th, 2008 at 2:24 am

mel,

Interesting. I missed the post about Craig Wilson.

As I said, it was all just my theory (i.e. speculation).

But I think there HAS to have been something. Why else wouldnít Jeter support ARod? It wasnít just that he refused to tell the fans to stop booing. He also just wouldnít admit just how bad the press was to ARod. In the absolutely horrible Verducci article, when Verducci pressed Jeter to admit that the press ARod had to deal with was worse than what anyone else had to put up with, Jeter first references Knoblach as someone with worse media attention, and then gave his patented, ďI donít think about that, all I care about is winning,Ē stock answer. Think about it - the media made a 3-day event out of ARod taking off his shirt in Central Park, and Jeter wonít even admit that ARod faces more intense media scrutiny than anyone else in baseball? If it wasnít due to personal animosity, then why?
19. mel January 8th, 2008 at 2:36 am

Clare,

Oh, I totally agree. There is something there, Jeter was glad when Alex opted out.

Itís childish and petty. But megastars have mega-egos. Itís inexcusable because Jeterís such a professional. But heís still my guy, even though his range is less than optimal. lol.

I know youíre not one of them, but some people here berate those who donít love Alex. Itís like forcing someone to like mushrooms when they donít like them. But if you give the mushrooms a chance youíll come to like them.
20. JJNJ January 8th, 2008 at 2:41 am

Two thumbs up!
21. Clare January 8th, 2008 at 2:42 am

mel,

You donít have to love him (or mushrooms). Smile

I just find the whole dynamic fascinating.

But my laundryís done, so Iím off to bed.

Good night.
22. mel January 8th, 2008 at 2:52 am

Clare,

I love mushrooms, and one day I will love Alex, too.

However, I find the dynamic tedious rather than fascinating. I hate conflict and wish for harmony in the Yankee clubhouse. Although, itís more likely that there will be peace in the Middle East before that happens. j/k

Smile
23. Bring Back Tony Womack to Play Left Field January 8th, 2008 at 4:49 am

You lost me at ďClueless JoeĒ
24. Fran January 8th, 2008 at 5:39 am

Totally agree Jay. In Alex we are watching one of the greatest players in the history of baseball and we should, as Yankee fans, come to appreciate him.
25. Thomo January 8th, 2008 at 5:59 am

Nice post - anything other than steroids and HGH is a welcome change!

To be nostalgic about the good old days- I suppose the 60ís were about Mantle and Maris and the 50ís Mantle (thatís as far back as I go). But sadly, baseball in the new millennium has become about the $$$.
26. dale d January 8th, 2008 at 6:15 am

Nice post IT guy. Iím sure your ďclueless JoeĒ reference was meant in the same vein it was originally written in. That Joe Torre had no idea what kind of caldron he was getting into going to work for ďthe BossĒ.
Joe Torre ended up doing all right donít ya think?
It is going to be very interesting watching the Yankees through the changes that are coming up. I just hope we have the patience to see them through.

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Cowboys sack Eli five times last time in they play them.

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:37 am

Cowboys sack Eli five times last time in they play them.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:58 am

With taped phone call, Clemens throws up and in at McNamee



http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=assael_shaun&id=3185725

Roger Clemens tried to paint his ex-trainer, Brian McNamee, as a lying weasel in his news conference on Monday. But what really emerged was a picture of two men who are from completely different worlds, each trying to salvage what he can from a partnership that -- if you believe McNamee -- has always been built on lies and deceit.

At the news conference, Clemens had only one job: to destroy the credibility of the man who told the Mitchell Commission that he injected Clemens 16 times with testosterone and HGH between 1998 and 2001. The Rocket had a great warm-up act in lawyer Rusty Hardin, who treated the press like a jury, begging reporters to hear the evidence he'd come to show. The smoking gun was to be the tape that Clemens had made the prior Friday, after McNamee e-mailed him begging to arrange a face-to-face meeting. Clemens knew he was being taped; McNamee didn't.

On the tape, Clemens drew his old trainer out like a rookie hitter. The only reason Clemens was calling back, he insisted, was because McNamee had mentioned his son, Brian Jr., a diabetic who is also apparently suffering from celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder. Solemnly dipping his head as he put a sick child into a media op, Clemens joined the press in listening to McNamee say, "He's not doing good. It's real, man. Everything else is a joke."

McNamee described his life like a Martin Scorsese movie, saying he had to leave his home in the Breezy Point section of Brooklyn because more than two dozen reporters were camped out. He had to pay for security. His wife didn't know what to do. His son was taking a turn for the worse.

This is what the steroid era of baseball has come to. It is not pretty.

Clemens also invoked his own kids, Koby, Kory, Kacy and Kody.

"It's not good," he kept saying, referring to the effect of the publicity on them.

But Clemens had just come back from a hunting trip. McNamee was calling from a one-room apartment on Long Island with his broken-down car in the parking lot.

"I don't have any money. I have nothing," he said, "Ö all I have is because of you."

He added, "All I did was what I thought was right. And I never thought it was right. But I thought that I had no other choice, let's put it that way."

Whatever you might think of McNamee, there was something gut-wrenching about hearing him say he'd ended up vomiting in a hospital.

"My wife is gone, the kids are gone. What do you want me to do?"

Unlike Greg Anderson -- his West Coast doppelganger, who was willing to go to prison to help defend Barry Bonds -- McNamee sounded cornered, not courageous.

Clemens kept saying, "I treated you just like everybody else." But if he meant it as a term of endearment, it fell flat. McNamee kept insisting, "No, you treated me better. You treated me like family Ö I ate with your family. I helped your kids with school projects. I tried to be like you."

He said he learned to be a father by watching Clemens: "I used how you were as a dad to your kids. I tried to be like you."

As a piece of baseball theater, the tape was vintage Clemens -- a late-inning intimidation tactic. But in the real world, it smacked of something else -- a millionaire employer humiliating an uppity employee by putting his intimate personal life on public display. Whatever transpired between the men, whatever quiet war they are waging, this was a step the Rocket didn't have to take.

The whole thing fell flat as evidence, anyway. McNamee never recanted what he told IRS special agent Jeff Novitzky.

"I'm with you. I'm in your corner," he told Clemens. "I don't want this to happen. But I'd also like not to go to jail."

In the end, McNamee might have unwittingly written the epitaph of baseball's steroid era when he told his father figure, Clemens: "I tried to help you as much as I could, as late as I could, and it was too late, I guess, to help. What it comes down to is the way it affects our kids. They had nothing to do with this."

No, but they appear to be paying the price.

Shaun Assael, a senior writer for ESPN The Magazine, writes extensively about doping in baseball and other sports in his new book, "Steroid Nation," available here.

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 5:03 am

Rogís pitch off target
Arrogant denial not best defense

http://bostonherald.com/sports/baseball/other_mlb/view.bg?articleid=1065231#articleFull

For 25 years, more than half your life now, theyíve been chasing you around with cameras and microphones and little tape recorders, begging you for a comment like bums begging for a quarter. They listen to your words, laugh at your jokes, and thank you for the mindless blather as if you were the Dalai Lama himself.

After a while, you start to think: Well, maybe Iím not just some simple country bumpkin after all. Maybe I really am funny, smart, insightful. Maybe I do talk good. They sure do seem to listen when I speak.

Now here comes a little trouble, and maybe your lawyers, your agents and your wife are worried. Not you. They probably want you to do the mea culpa like your pal Andy Pettitte and so many others. Just say you tried it once or twice, say you wanted to get back quickly from an injury to help your teammates. Like Andy did. Or say you felt like all the hitters were juicing and you just wanted an even playing field. Make it easy on yourself



Oh, but you couldnít do it, could you?Not you. Not the Rocket. Everything is a battle, a one-on-one showdown between you and the other guy, and this is no different. You didnít win 354 games and seven Cy Youngs by backing down. You did it by shooting up. But itís been almost 10 years since you started cheating, according to Brian McNamee. You got away with it for too long and were too careful to get dimed out by your own trainer now.

Sorry, Deb. Step aside, Rusty. Here comes the old Possessed Rebel. You are ignoring legal advice, digging in your heels and risking it all. How do we know this? We know it because even the worst lawyer in the world - weíre thinking Mike Nifong - wouldnít advise you sit down with ď60 MinutesĒ and run the Third Ear defense by 15 million people. A third ear, Roger? Pulling tractors with your teeth? This is 2008, my friend. We have seen the effects of steroids and human growth hormone on ballplayers. They donít add ears to your foreheads. They add mph to your fastball. They work. Thatís kind of been established.

But yesterday in Houston, before less sympathetic media members, you threw more junk against the wall than Gallagher and somehow expected it to stick. When asked about the effects of steroids, you actually said, ďI donít think it helps you hit a baseball, run faster or whatever.Ē

Doesnít help you hit a baseball? Are you serious? Do you forget your friend Jose Canseco? Do you remember McGwire and Sosa in 1998? Did you ever catch highlights of that mushroom-headed juicer out in San Francisco? Hell, do you remember the name Ben Johnson? I think we can all agree steroids helped him run faster - faster than Barbaro, if memory serves.

Is this the same jive youíre going to run by Congress next week? Are you going to raise your right hand, swear on a Bible, and then say youíre innocent because you donít have an ear coming out of your forehead? If so, Iím thinking you want to reconsider your strategy and do what Sammy Sosa did. Just pretend you canít speak English. It might work for you.

Your arrogance always served you well on the mound, but it ainít working for you now, pal. Yesterday you whipped out this 17-minute, tape-recorded telephone call between you and McNamee and then took questions from the hostile crowd. Did you really think that was going to help?

Letís get this straight: You set the guy up on the pretense that you cared about his ill 10-year-old son. He obviously was an emotional mess because he was forced to give up the goods on his best client. You say heís lying, and yet you never tell him to stop lying.

Over and over again, McNamee asked you to tell him what to do. If youíre innocent and youíre talking to the guy who just destroyed your reputation, cost you millions, forced you to testify before Congress and ripped your family apart, you might come back with something like this:

What do I want you to do, Brian? Just one thing: Tell me why you ruined my life, you no good, lying, back-stabbing SOB?

But no. You mostly just stammered and stuttered and worried about poor Deb and the boys. During the conversation, you were no doubt taking hand signals and written notes from your lawyers while McNamee poured his heart out. So whoís the rat now?

On the tape, McNamee says to you, ďAll I did was what I thought was right. Not what I thought was right, but I had no other choice.Ē

And why did he have no choice? Because if he lied he was going to jail. He likes you - hell, he worships the ground you walk on - but he ainít Greg Anderson (although he volunteered to go to jail for Clemens). Heís no martyr. Does he think itís ďrightĒ to give you up? Of course not. But like he said: No choice.

You, on the other hand, had a choice. You could have come clean a month ago and made it easier on everyone. You turned it into a heavyweight fight and now youíre on your way to Washington for the next round. We know you donít like to take advice, but weíre going to give you some anyway:

Forget the third ear and remember how Sosa made it through the last hearing.

Repeat after me: No habla Ingles, congressman.

It may be your only chance.


RedMagma

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Re: Clemens fired McNamee after the allegation and after the Yan

Post  RedMagma on Tue Jan 08, 2008 5:05 am

QUOTE(Wingack @ Jan 7 2008, 10:04 PM) *
Certainly a red flag, but I am not going to get worked about it. Sickles seems to love Suttle, so at this point it is just a matter of opinion. Obviously he had a very ugly HWB debut. However, he was rated the best college hitter coming out of the draft so I am not going to go nuts about him being drafted and given a bonus just yet. I could change that tune in June though.


You keep telling yourself that. Wieters, LaPorta, Mills, etc.

QUOTE(amarshal2 @ Jan 7 2008, 10:53 PM) *
You keep telling yourself that. Wieters, LaPorta, Mills, etc.


Well, it's not me it's BA. I could have been more specific I guess, Best Pure Hitter:

QUOTE
BEST PURE HITTER
College
1 Brad Suttle, 3b, Texas (34)
2 Matt Mangini, 3b, Oklahoma State (52)
3 Matt Wieters, c, Georgia Tech (2)

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