The Minneapolis Star Tribune

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The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:57 am

Jan 17, 2008 10:39 am - Read: Orientation

http://www.metsblog.com/


...posted by Matthew Cerrone...

The Associated Press details a 12-day orientation by the Red Sox, for the team’s prospects, modeled after a Cleveland Indians program, ‘during which players stay with host families while seeing sights and learning their way around Boston.’

This year, UCONN basketball coach Jim Calhoun was among the program’s motivational speakers, while ESPN.com’s Peter Gammons spoke to the group about dealing with reporters.

…this is a very interesting program…if it’s effective, and i don’t know why it wouldn’t be, i’m surprised that the Mets and Yankees do not run a similar program, seeing as people are always concerned whether specific people can or cannot play in New York…it seems to me, having a seminar like this can only help…or, at least help answer that question a bit better

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that "Twins officials privately say they think [Johan] Santana will be traded before spring training opens next month."

The newspaper speculates that "the Twins have seemed most intrigued with the Mets' offer" recently, but adds that the Yankees and Red Sox remain in the mix. The Mets were previously said to have offered Carlos Gomez, Deolis Guerra, Philip Humber and Kevin Mulvey, but the Twins are rumored to be holding out for Fernando Martinez.


There must be so little to write about that they post the same articles over and over. Hey that sounds familiar

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:59 am

Originally Posted by jets rooter View Post
1-darren mcfadden r.b.
2-frank okem d.t.
3-barry richardson o.t.
4-kenny iwebemea d.e.o.l.b.
5-robert felton o.g.
6-jeremy jones i.l.b.
7-chris pressley f.b.
Oh yeah. Glad to see you took your time to explain why!
__________________

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:02 am

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Quicklinks: Roster | Transactions | Depth Chart | Salary Info | Schedule | Free Agency Tracker | NFL Draft | Fantasy Rankings

2006 Draft Value Chart
Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5 Round 6 Round 7 Additional Rounds
1 3000 33 580 65 265 97 112 129 43 161 28 193 15.2 225 2.9
2 2600 34 560 66 260 98 108 130 42 162 27.6 194 14.8 226 2.8
3 2200 35 550 67 255 99 104 131 41 163 27.2 195 14.4 227 2.7
4 1800 36 540 68 250 100 100 132 40 164 26.8 196 14 228 2.6
5 1700 37 530 69 245 101 96 133 39.5 165 26.4 197 13.6 229 2.5
6 1600 38 520 70 240 102 92 134 39 166 26 198 13.2 230 2.4
7 1500 39 510 71 235 103 88 135 38.5 167 25.6 199 12.8 231 2.3
8 1400 40 500 72 230 104 86 136 38 168 25.2 200 12.4 232 2.2
9 1350 41 490 73 225 105 84 137 37.5 169 24.8 201 12 233 2.1
10 1300 42 480 74 220 106 82 138 37 170 24.4 202 11.6 234 2.0
11 1250 43 470 75 245 107 80 139 36.5 171 24 203 11.2 235 1.9
12 1200 44 460 76 210 108 78 140 36 172 23.6 204 10.8 236 1.8
13 1150 45 450 77 205 109 76 141 35.5 173 23.2 205 10.4 237 1.7
14 1100 46 440 78 200 110 74 142 35 174 22.8 206 10 238 1.6
15 1050 47 430 79 195 111 72 143 34.5 175 22.4 207 9.6 239 1.5
16 1000 48 420 80 190 112 70 144 34 176 22 208 9.2 240 1.4
17 950 49 410 81 185 113 68 145 33.5 177 21.6 209 8.8 241 1.3
18 900 50 400 82 180 114 66 146 33 178 21.2 210 8.4 242 1.2
19 875 51 390 83 175 115 64 147 32.6 179 20.8 211 8 243 1.1
20 850 52 380 84 170 116 62 148 32.2 180 20.4 212 7.6 244 1
21 800 53 370 85 165 117 60 149 31.8 181 20 213 7.2 245 .95
22 780 54 360 86 160 118 58 150 31.4 182 19.6 214 6.8 246 .9
23 760 55 350 87 155 119 56 151 31 183 19.2 215 6.4 247 .85
24 740 56 340 88 150 120 54 152 31.6 184 18.8 216 6 248 .8
25 720 57 330 89 145 121 52 153 31.2 185 18.4 217 5.6 249 .75
26 700 58 320 90 140 122 50 154 30.8 186 18 218 5.2 250 .7
27 680 59 310 91 136 123 49 155 30.4 187 17.6 219 4.8 251 .65
28 660 60 300 92 132 124 48 156 30 188 17.2 220 4.4 252 .6
29 640 61 292 93 128 125 47 157 29.6 189 16.8 221 4 253 .55
30 620 62 284 94 124 126 46 158 29.2 190 16.4 222 3.6 254 .5
31 600 63 276 95 120 127 45 159 28.8 191 16 223 3.3 255 .45
32 590 64 270 96 116 128 44 160 28.4 192 15.6 224 3 256 .4

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:05 am

Jets picks in the 2008 Draft by the number


1st Round - 6th overall
2nd Round - 36th overall
3rd Round - 67th overall
4th Round - 98th overall
5th Round - 133rd overall
6th Round - 164th overall
7th Round - 196th overall

so it looks like the Jets will be picking around 1:15 on that Saturday (remember 10 minute 1st rounds now instead of 15 thank God)...hey 4 picks out of the 1st hundred may make it interesting-check your PM KJ


I don't think we have any picks from trades. IIRC, the Kendall pick was a 5th in '08 or a 4th in '09 and we are getting the 4th. The Bucs deal was a conditional deal for Mackey who did not stick, so I don't think we are getting the pick. That's usually one of the conditions. Mackey ended up back here and was one of the guys signed to futures contracts this week.
__________


I can understand your frustration, but quite a bit of it is openly ridiculous. Just to point out a few items:

We didn't "get caught sleeping while Moss went to the Pats". Moss took a below market deal to go there. We were never in the running and I don't care what your friends uncle lip-read when Chad whispered in Moss' ear after the Oakland game in '06.

Why do you think that we need "a rookie phenom runnng back"? You like Peterson? Nice, how do you like Reggie Bush? RB is actually one of the stronger positions on the team. Jones and Washington aren't exactly Snell and Boozer, but they are both worthy of playing time. Why can't we address RB through FA? Why can't we use a later round pick? Seems like any piece of **** the Giants or Steelers plug back there does fine. Maybe it really is the line. Damon Bradshaw anybody?

Why are you shouting to fix the line through FA? Most teams with top lines drafted their players. In fact, on our own line the top three players were drafted. The FAs ALL BLOW. Did you notice?

Some personal notes: I don't give a flying **** if this team has a "face" or not. I want to win. I don't want to look at posters, infants jerseys and Wiz commercials.

I think the D was better, but I don't think that the O being better will help the D as much as many people think. Lack of time of possession can wear a team down, but I think if our O is a little scarier teams will be more likely to open it up against us. That will probably result in more turnovers, but also many more big plays. It's a lot easier to slowly grind out a win when you know your opponent can't score than to jump on their throat and risk a turnover.

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:08 am

The Tampa Tribune reports that the Rays have talked to the Braves about Willy Aybar.
Tampa Bay is said to be looking for some veteran competition for Evan Longoria at third base and Aybar could work despite being just 24 years old himself. He may have fallen out of favor in Atlanta due to off-field issues and didn't play at all last season because of a wrist injury, but did hit .339 in the Dominican Republic's winter league.
Source: Tampa Tribune
Related: Evan Longoria

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:20 am

"Loudmouth Hank please stop talking and Be quiet. Hank's recent comments that He's ready to give up and surrender Johan to Mets?"


It's all smoke... The Twins have been attempting to make the Yankees believe Santana was about to be dealt to the Red Sox or the Mets for more than a month now.

At the same time, the Yankees are trying to make the Twins believe they really don't care.

All smoke. And virtually all of it either coming out of or directed towards the Twins and the Yankees, which should tell us a lot.

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:25 am

And if the Yanks get interested, then what? They ship Santana off to the Yanks for a smaller package than they would’ve originally gotten before the Winter Meetings and have to face Santana twice a year? No way, they go back to the Mets, demand F-Mart, and I hope Omar gives in.

As Mets fans, we have to look at this realistically. Minor league players have utility when they can start in the major leagues… none of cares how the New Orleans Zephyrs or B-Mets do next year. So assuming we trade F-Mart, Gomez, Humber, Mulvey, Guerra, we’re losing a total of 0 guys who start on the major league club in 2008, and we keep our best pitching prospect who can start this year. Gomez would probably start in 2009 in place of Alou, but the Mets sign a stop-gap LF until one of their other prospects develop. The point is, this trade sets the Mets up to be a contender for 3 years, and in those 3 years, the Mets can develop new players to take the place of Martinez, Gomez, and Guerra as top prospects. It’s the same logic Dave Dombrowski used in Detroit in trading Cameron Maybin — by the time he needs to fill the shoes of Miguel Cabrera and Dontrelle WIllis, he’ll have new prospects developed and ready. Make the deal.




Totally wrong on Wilpon paying the money. It said in all the NY/NJ papers a few days ago the Mets say they will not give more than a 5 year extension. Santana wants 6 plus a bonus to make the year he has left up to a top level salary. The papers all said the Mets say they will not go more than 5 years, contrary to a report about two weeks ago saying Wilpon agreed that he will pay Santana.

You all are in a lather over nothing. The Mets are not getting Santana. Still nothing from a NY source. All the smoke comes out of Minnesota to get the Yankees interested.


my vote in the confidence poll has nothing to do w/ weather or not the yankees get johan if we don’t. it has to do w/ my confidence or lack there of in the organization. i don’t see why it matters if he goes to spanks or sox or anybody else…i found it funny that you framed the poll question that way.



Here we go again. Does everyone notice this story once again comes only from the Minnesota side. With the NY press always looking for a story, doesn’t anyone think that some NY writer would have the story to report in the NY papers if the Mets were getting close to Santana.

Matt seemed to get excited every time the Twins plant a story, but this is nothing more than the Twins once again planting a Mets are close trade to try and put pressure on the Yankees and Red Sox to up their offer.

For the last time, Santana is not coming to the Mets. They are not going to accept the Mets prospect offer over major league ready players, and the Mets say they will not sign Santana to more than a 5 year extension, anyway. Get off it and move on. Santana is not coming to the Mets.

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:38 am

January 17th, 2008 at 10:26 am

“I understand you sign the talent that is out there and go with the best available, but it seems the current thinking is power pitching righties.”

That’s who’s been available. There wasn’t a lefty better than Ian when they took Ian. There wasn’t a righty better then Joba (given his attendant injury questions) when they took Joba.

“Sometimes you can fall too much for the hype over developing players, reading too much into the stats they are putting up,”

Fortunately, with Phil, pretty much every talent evaluator, stathead or otherwise, was rating him one of the best pitching prospects in baseball in 07. And now, it’s Joba. These guys aren’t over-inflated. They are legitimate ace prospects. They might wash out, but if you’re going to bet on a prospect, these are the kind you bet on. They’re not highly rated on great-stuff-if-they-can-control-it like many other guys. They have great stuff and they know where it’s going when they throw it. And they have excellent makeup — especially Phil.


hmmm January 17th, 2008 at 10:25 am

“One of the problems I have with the current crop of pitching they are signing is they all seem to be right handed pitchers. I understand you sign the talent that is out there and go with the best available, but it seems the current thinking is power pitching righties. ”

it would be nice to have some more left handers, but i think the Yankees are simply taking the pitchers that they feel have the most talent. i don’t think it’s intentional.

i don’t want them to take a pitcher they have rated a little lower than another pitcher because he is left handed.


hmmm, I agree, they need to develop the farm system, that allows for some flexibility. One of the problems I have with the current crop of pitching they are signing is they all seem to be right handed pitchers. I understand you sign the talent that is out there and go with the best available, but it seems the current thinking is power pitching righties.

I think the developing farm system can become a double edged sword though. Yes, its fun to see your “own” talents develop and come up through the system, but no team ever gets all the best talent. Sometimes you can fall too much for the hype over developing players, reading too much into the stats they are putting up, and then when they are brought to the majors they fizzle out.

Randy, I don’t think it really matters about holding players back due to age/ peak potentials. I think its more about keeping them in the minors to develop and come up when they are really ready to do so. Hughes was brought up early, as we all know, due to all the problems with SP. It was only between a half a year and a year early though. Some talents you don’t keep back. It doesn’t make sense to hold back a player who can make a contribution - a positive contribution - to the team because they aren’t in their “peak” years. Sometimes you just have to ride the wave.


“i’m just saying bring up players really young actually cost more than bringing them at a more cost efficient time. for instance, papelbon made 425 thousand last year at age 27.”

Papelbon also went to college, Phil Hughes came straight from high school. Phil Hughes spent the same amount of time in the minors as Papelbon. Hughes pitched 275IP’s and Papelbon pitched 277 IP’s. Why would you stunt your prospects’ development simply to keep from paying him. That’s how the Rays operate. The Yankees aren’t worried about paying money to their players.



“Since then, more than ever, the Yankees made it a point to sign big-name free agents, trade away top prospects for veterans who were declining or simply did not produce, and emphasize offense over pitching and defense.”

i have to disagree with this assessment.

in the last 7 years, what were these “top prospects for veterans” trades you mention? i don’t really remember any.

i guess you could say the Vazquez trade, but he was only 27 and was one of the best pitchers in the National League. also, bringing up that trade kindof contradicts your next sentence.

i don’t think you can count the weaver trade, since Lilly is OLDER than Weaver, and Weaver was a much better pitcher at the time.

the Yankees didn’t make a deliberate choice to emphasize offense over pitching/defense. there just hasn’t been a lot of pitching on the market in the last few years. so they improved the team where they could, the offense. it’s not like they were ignoring the pitching on purpose.

they got burned on a few pitching acquisitions, so the Yankees decided the only way to get good, young pitching was to develop their own.

we are starting to see this pay off in 2008.

you guys just have to wait one more year (and i am not talking about Johan, if the Twins lower their demands, the Yankees will do it. if they don’t they won’t.).


# Paul Fiore January 17th, 2008 at 10:00 am

“Our farm system right now is the best it’s been in ages.”

I agree with Rebecca. Our farm system is improving by the year and if Cashman lets these prospects develop and not get traded or rushed, we should have the #1 farm system soon enough.


January 17th, 2008 at 9:54 am

OYF, Sorry I didn’t know I had to write a thesis for you when making a comment.

Plain and simple, there needs to be a balance of signing FA players and using talents from within. Striking that balance is what Cashman failed to do through these past years. I personally don’t want to see the Yankees having the “success” that the Diamondbacks and Fish have had. I expect them to have better than a flash in the pan WS win, then go back to mediocrity.

A Santana trade is one of those damned if you do, damned if you don’t types. Giving up Hughes would be tough, and with all the years of hearing about Hughes makes it tougher.

The headline post seems to lean toward making the Yankees into versions of the Marlins or D’Backs. Does that sound all that appealing to you? It doesn’t to me. Holding onto promising prospects is nice, but when a player of Santana’s ability becomes available, it makes it hard to evaluate. Hughes has tremendous potential, Santana has proven talent. I would say in this instance I want to have my cake and eat it too.

If the Yankees were to be like the Marlins or D’Backs, then they wouldn’t even be in the talks for Santana. They would not have A-Rod, Abreu, Matsui, Jeter, but they would be keeping the farm kids and promoting them and hoping to have everything gel.

I don’t want to see the Yankees be a team that might contend for the WS once every 4-6 years. I want to see them keep going with their post season appearances. Maybe with a different Manager now, their post season play will be different enough for the bats to stay working.

January 17th, 2008 at 9:48 am

One does not need to be a Red Sox troll to realize that a lot of dumb people think really hard about the Yankees, write about them, and manage to spew out the above. What stupid braindead tripe.

Those ESL classes didn’t work for Pablo.

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:42 am

Comics and Commissions


http://sunnyart.wordpress.com/2008/01/17/milbs-top-50-prospects-complete-listing/


Just another WordPress.com weblog
« Hello world!
MiLB’s top 50 prospects complete listing

Joba ChamberlainJonathon Mayo comprised the top 50 prospects list for 2008. You can find the URL here:
MiLB Top 50 Prospects

From the article:

“This year’s rankings come courtesy of 20 members of the scouting community. The results were tabulated in an AP poll-type format: Each voter submitted a list of their top 30 prosepcts, with a No. 1 ranking worth 30 points, No. 2 worth 29 and so on down to one. The cumulative score for each player helped determine the final rankings.

The only parameters set for the participants is that a prospect must still have rookie status heading into the 2008 season to be included on this list. That’s why you won’t see Justin Upton or Kevin Slowey here. Any other Minor Leaguers, from Triple-A players knocking on the door to recent draftees just getting started, were eligible for the rankings. “

It’s built so you have to click through each name to read about them and the scouts notes, so being the lazy bastich I am (and of course having no life helps), I just compiled it into one looooooooong list so if you have a couple hours to kill - read on:

1. Jay Bruce
Team: Reds
Position: OF
Bats: L
Throws: L
In 2007, Bruce finished second in the Minors with 80 extra-base hits, hitting well over .300 across three levels of competition. In his two-plus years of pro ball, Bruce has belted out 165 extra-base hits for a career .543 slugging percentage. He may not have the jets of a Maybin or Upton, two of the other high school outfield draftees from 2005, but he’s got some speed and can hold his own in center, a position he’s played frequently in the Minors. That being said, he profiles as an elite right-fielder who’ll hit for average and power while stopping runners from taking the extra base with his arm. The 2005 draft may go down as one of the best of all time — and Bruce may be the most pure hitter of the lot.

2. Evan Longoria
Team: Rays
Position: 3B
Bats: R
Throws: R
With fewer than 200 professional games under his belt, Longoria appears ready for the big leagues. He made it to Triple-A in his first full season and has shown the ability to hit for average and power in his brief pro career. Defensively, he’s got good hands and a strong arm at third base. His makeup and work ethic are off the charts. That should enable him to get to the big leagues, and stay there, in short order.

3. Cameron Maybin
Team: Marlins
Position: CF
Bats: R
Throws: R
Wherever Maybin has played as a pro, he has stood out as one of the best players on the field. He can do everything well and he’s still improving. Even at his age and with time lost to injury, he’s not far from bringing his five-tool talent to the big-league stage full-time. He didn’t do much in his first taste, but he will assuredly be one of the most exciting players in baseball for a long time.

4. Clayton Kershaw
Team: Dodgers
Position: SP
Bats: L
Throws: L
Clayton Kershaw is so good that he’d likely still be the highest-ranked pitcher on this list even if he were right-handed. His combination of size, mound presence and stuff was the best the Minors had to offer. The fact that he does it all from the left side is icing on a pretty good cake.
Kershaw, at age 19, was the best pitcher in the Midwest League and then seamlessly handled the jump to Double-A. His fastball-curve combination completely befuddled hitters in the lower levels of the Minors. Upon reaching the Southern league, he started to mix in a changeup, allowing him to finish second in the Minor Leagues in strikeouts per nine innings. He can throw his pitches for strikes at any point in the count and aggressively goes after hitters. The jump to Jacksonville officially put Kershaw on the fast track in the Dodgers system and while they’ve had some cautionary tales with young arms getting hurt, it’s not hard to envision Kershaw reaching Los Angeles before his listed ETA.

5. Joba Chamberlain
Team: Yankees
Position: SP
Bats: R
Throws: R
What to do for an encore? Chamberlain dominated three levels of the Minors, went to the Futures Game and made it to the big leagues as a high-impact short reliever — a new role for him — in his first season of pro ball. He was largely unhittable at each level, first as a starter in the Minors, then as the bridge to Mariano Rivera in the big leagues.
Considering his success, it would be understandable if the Yankees left Chamberlain in the bullpen. But it wouldn’t take advantage of everything he has to offer. He’s got the kind of stuff that should put him near the top of the rotation in time, with the ability to throw four pitches — fastball, curve, slider and changeup — for strikes. You never can tell what might happen in the future with trades and signings, but the concept of a Philip Hughes-Joba Chamberlain-Ian Kennedy rotation should make Yankee fans plan for baseball deep into October for the next decade or so.

6. Clay Buchholz
Team: Red Sox
Position: SP
Bats: L
Throws: R
The Red Sox Minor League Pitcher of the Year in 2006, Buchholz combines plus, plus stuff along with mound presence and poise into a future front-of-the-rotation package. It’s hard to imagine him heading back to the Minors at this point, having left the farm system with a 2.46 ERA and a ridiculous strikeout rate. He can throw several pitches to get hitters out and fans in Fenway should enjoy him doing it consistently for years to come.

7. Colby Rasmus
Team: Cardinals
Position: CF
Bats: L
Throws: L
Rasmus is another exciting young talent with all five tools at his disposal. He played nearly all of 2007 in the Double-A Texas League at age 20 and lead the league in home runs and finished among the leaders in a slew of other offensive categories.
Rasmus is also a talented center fielder with a strong arm and speed that plays as well in the field as it does on the basepaths (he’s stolen 59 bases and been caught 14 times in his career). He should move up to Triple-A with an eye on St. Louis in 2008.

8. Andrew McCutchen
Team: Pirates
Position: CF
Bats: R
Throws: R
In the first half of the 2007 season, McCutchen didn’t look ready for the challenge Pittsburgh gave him by sending him to Double-A at age 20. He proved his mettle by responding well to the adversity, hit like the top outfield prospect he is in the second half and finished the season with a strong showing in Triple-A before performing well in the Arizona Fall League.
That AFL performance could help serve as a springboard for the 21-year-old in 2008. He’s got five-tool potential, plays gold-glove caliber defense in center field and the ability to either lead off or drive in runs from the middle of the lineup. He could settle in as a Pirates cornerstone at some point during the 2008 season.

9. Homer Bailey
Team: Reds
Position: SP
Bats: R
Throws: R
When Bailey is 100 percent, he’s got ace potential with two plus pitches in his fastball and curve, along with an improving changeup. He also seems like a good candidate to avoid arm trouble as he’s had good mechanics ever since he was a high schooler in the 2004 draft class. He’ll turn just 22 in the early stages of the 2008 season.

10. Adam Miller
Team: Indians
Position: SP
Bats: R
Throws: R
Despite the amount of time he’s missed with a variety of arm and finger injuries, Miller still managed to crack the top 10. When healthy, he still has impressive stuff and he’ll be just 23 in the 2008 season.
When he’s 100 percent, he still can crank his fastball up to the mid- to upper-90s, complementing it with a good changeup and a plus, plus slider. Finger and elbow injuries really slowed him down in 2007 and likely cost him a chance to reach Cleveland for the first time, but he managed to return for the Arizona Fall League season. He’s got front-of-the-rotation stuff if he can stay on the mound. He also has a power arsenal that could work well in a bullpen role if the Indians have a need or want to protect his arm.

11. David Price
Team: Rays
Position: P
Bats: R
Throws: R
One of the big reasons why Price went No. 1 overall in 2007 was the possibility of seeing him in a big-league rotation sooner rather than later. He hasn’t thrown a pro pitch yet, but scouts certainly see him as that kind of guy.
He’s got tremendous stuff, with a plus fastball, slider and above-average changeup, excellent command of his pitches and the kind of leadership on the mound that screams “future ace.” Price has great makeup and is extremely competitive. Add in the fact that this enticing package all comes in a left-hander and it’s no wonder he nearly hit the top 10.

12. Wade Davis
Team: Rays
Position: SP
Bats: R
Throws: R
The big right-hander has outstanding stuff combined with good command, consistency and outstanding poise. He can run his fastball up into the upper-90s and his hard curve is a plus pitch. His changeup and cutter have come a long way in the past year. Looking at his arsenal, size and delivery, one can easily see him as a future front-of-the-rotation pitcher.

13. Jacoby Ellsbury
Team: Pirates
Position: CF
Bats: L
Throws: L
Ellsbury made quick work of the Red Sox system since being taken in the first round of the 2005 draft, hitting .314 in the Minors with high on-base numbers and tremendous success on the basepaths. He’s an outstanding defensive center fielder as well and Red Sox Nation should enjoy him hitting atop the lineup and patrolling Fenway’s pastures for a long time to come.

14. Rick Porcello
Team: Tigers
Position: P
Bats: R
Throws: R
Heading into the 2007 draft, there was a solid consensus that Porcello was the best high school arm in the draft. Some thought he was the best arm, period, in the entire class. That’s why he ranks this highly despite not having thrown a competitive professional pitch outside of instructs.
He’s the complete package, with a build scouts love, plus, plus stuff combined with a command not usually seen in prep stars. High school pitchers are often a risky endeavor — especially those who hail from the Northeast and thus haven’t pitched as much as those from warmer climes — but Porcello is about as safe a pick given those criteria as any. Look for him to climb the Tigers ladder quickly.

15. Travis Snider
Team: Jays
Position: RF
Bats: L
Throws: L
In 172 career games, Snider has a .316 average and .926 OPS. He more than held his own as a teenager in the Arizona Fall League, finishing in the top 10 in batting average, slugging percentage, on-base percentage and OPS.
In other words, the guy can flat-out hit. He’s also a decent outfielder with a strong arm that should allow him to become a prototypical right fielder. His experience in the AFL could mean a faster ticket to that future, perhaps with a jump up to Double-A, if not to start, then at least at some point in 2008.

16. Franklin Morales
Team: Rockies
Position: P
Bats: L
Throws: L
The power lefty came a long way from the beginning of the 2007 season, improving the command of his plus stuff and refining his secondary pitches, most notably a changeup that had lagged behind his fastball and curve. There used to be talk that if Morales couldn’t adequately harness his stuff, he would make a very good short reliever. Those discussions have ended as Morales will begin his ascension to the top of the Rockies’ rotation in 2008.

17. Fernando Martinez
Team: Mets
Position: CF
Bats: L
Throws: R
When healthy, Martinez has tremendous potential with the bat. He should eventually hit for both average and power from a corner outfield spot. He has the ability to play decent defense and isn’t a bad runner, but all his skills are still on the raw side. Assuming he’s healthy in 2008, Martinez should be able to continue his quick ascent to New York. Starting the year back in Double-A might be the way to go, but even if he begins there, it’s unlikely he’ll finish the season at the same level.
18. Nick Adenhart
Team: Angels
Position: P
Bats: R
Throws: R
One of the most intriguing picks in the 2004 draft, Adenhart has been rewarding the Angels for selecting him in the 14th round of that draft even though he required Tommy John surgery. Now they have one of the top right-handed pitching prospects in the game, one with a three-pitch mix who has played an entire season of Double-A ball and is just 21 years old.
Needless to say, Adenhart is way ahead of the curve despite the elbow surgery he had after being drafted. He’ll move up to Triple-A and be knocking on the big-league door all season long. Should the Angels need help or decide to trade from their pitching depth, it shouldn’t surprise anyone if Adenhart arrives in Los Angeles next season.

19. Brandon Wood
Team: Angels
Position: SS
Bats: R
Throws: R
It’s possible that Wood may never live up to his 2005 season, in which he had more than 100 extra-base hits. That doesn’t mean he won’t be a very productive run producer in the big leagues. He’s got a career .528 slugging percentage and managed to make his Major League debut at age 22. At the same time, he made a pretty smooth transition to third base.
Wood still strikes out a lot and headed to Mexico this winter to work on pitch recognition. The real question now is where he’ll play. Will it be at third for the Angels, where Chone Figgins is likely to play in ‘08? Could he move back to shortstop now that Orlando Cabrera is gone, though Erick Aybar appears to be the front-runner there? Or perhaps he’ll end up calling another organization home.

20. Jacob McGee
Team: Rays
Position: SP
Bats: L
Throws: L
The young lefty was among the Minor League leaders in strikeouts, strikeouts per nine innings and batting average against this year. He did most of it before turning 21.
McGee began the year in the Class A Advanced Florida State League, but ended it by helping Montgomery win the Double-A Southern League title. He uses a three-pitch mix — fastball, curve and changeup — to miss a whole lot of bats. Another year in the Minors wouldn’t be a bad thing, but he could be ready by late 2008 should the need arise.

21. Matt Wieters
Team: O’s
Position: C
Bats: S
Throws: R
The switch-hitter has power from both sides of the plate and can hit to all fields. He’s big behind the plate, but most feel he should be able stay there defensively, with fair agility despite his size and good arm strength. That being said, it will be his bat that will determine how quickly he can get to the big leagues.

22. Mike Moustakas
Team: Royals
Position: SS
Bats: L
Throws: R
Moustakas can flat-out hit and should do so for average as well as a lot of power. His approach at the plate should allow him to move quickly through the system, a la Billy Butler. The only thing that could slow his progress is his lack of a true defensive home. He played shortstop in high school — because of Dominguez at third — and the Royals let him stay there in his brief pro debut. That won’t be his long-range spot, though, with third being a possible destination. But that’s secondary. His bat will make the Royals find room for him when he’s ready.

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:43 am

23. Carlos Gonzalez
Team: A’s (from DBacks in Haren trade)
Position: RF
Bats: L
Throws: L
Gonzalez still needs to work on certain parts of his game, most notably his approach at the plate and his willingness to go all out on every at-bat. If he can make those improvements, he has the chance to be an impact bat in the big leagues soon. Gonzalez should hit for both average and power and fits the profile of a right fielder with a terrific outfield arm.
It should be noted that he’s just 22 and many of the concerns about his attitude may dissipate as he matures. He’s already played some Triple-A ball and got regular playing time in the highly competitive Venezuelan Winter

League. A year of Triple-A wouldn’t be a bad thing, but freed from the logjam in Arizona, he could force the issue sooner than he would have before the trade to the A’s.

24. Gio Gonzalez
Team: A’s (from White Sox in Swisher trade)
Position: P
Bats: R
Throws: L
He’s coming off a very successful year, leading the Minor Leagues in strikeouts while keeping Southern League hitters scratching their heads all season long. Gonzalez can throw three pitches for strikes, with a solid average to above-average fastball, one of the best curveballs in the Minors and a pretty good changeup. There’s been some concern about his durability because of his size, but he’s reached 150 innings in each of the past two seasons, answering most of those questions.
It’s clear Gonzalez, at the very least, is ready to move up after two seasons at the Double-A level. That might mean a year of Triple-A at age 22, which certainly wouldn’t hurt.

25. Eric Hurley
Team: Rangers
Position: P
Bats: R
Throws: R
The hard-throwing right-hander uses a hard, heavy sinker/fastball and can throw both a two- and four-seam fastball by hitters. His other offerings — a slider and changeup — aren’t bad, but are a bit behind his fastball. Once he establishes command of those pitches, the sky could be the limit.
Following the pattern of his career thus far — and what the Rangers have done with other pitchers in the past — Hurley should reach Arlington at some point in 2008. Give him a little time back in Triple-A to iron out his game and he could be ready to join the Rangers’ rotation by midseason.

26. Ian Kennedy
Team: Yankees
Position: SP
Bats: R
Throws: R
His buddy Joba Chamberlain may have created more buzz with his big-league splash, but what Kennedy did in his first season of pro ball should certainly not be overlooked. The MiLB.com Overall Starting Pitcher of the Year pitched at three levels on his way to the big leagues. He won’t light up radar guns like Chamberlain, instead relying on outstanding command of four pitches to get hitters out. He did show that despite the plus fastball, he could miss more than enough bats to succeed.
Just when he’ll get a chance to do that in New York remains to be seen. Of the Yankees’ young pitchers, he’s the one most likely to start the year in Triple-A, though there is an outside shot he could begin the year at the back end of the Yankees’ rotation. Either way, look for him to contribute more in the bigs than the three starts he had in 2007.

27. Matt Antonelli
Team: Padres
Position: 3B
Bats: R
Throws: R
A major contributor to San Antonio’s Texas League championship run, Antonelli showed the ability to hit for average and power, run well and get on base.
All those skills should serve him well once he gets to PETCO Park, where his home run totals might take a hit, but his extra-base pop and speed should play well. With second base not blocked by an established veteran, he could get a shot on the big stage sooner rather than later.

28. Carlos Carrasco
Team: Phillies
Position: P
Bats: R
Throws: R
There were two things one could take from Carrasco’s first taste of Double-A at age 20 in 2007. First, he’s got a bit to learn. Second, it was impressive how quickly he adjusted and picked up on the areas he needs improvement. The top prospect in the Phillies system has an above-average fastball with good movement along with a plus, plus changeup. His curve improved greatly in 2007 and if he can perfect the pitch, he should take his place right behind Cole Hamels in the Phillies rotation.
When that happens depends on how quickly he takes what he learned in 2007 and uses it on the mound. He’ll likely head back to Double-A to start the season at age 21. Even if he spends all season in the Minors, we’re still looking at a 22-year old ready to be the Phillies’ No. 2 starter in 2009.

29. Chase Headley
Team: Padres
Position: 3B
Bats: S
Throws: R
To call 2007 a breakout year for Headley would be a bit of an understatement. All the third baseman did in his second full season was nearly win the Texas League Triple Crown, finish in the top five in 11 offensive categories and make his big-league debut to boot.
Headley has always had an advanced hitting approach with outstanding on-base skills. His power increased in 2007, making him a more complete hitter. He’s fine defensively at third and appears to be ready to contribute full-time in San Diego.

30. Josh Vitters
Team: Cubs
Position: 3B
Bats: R
Throws: R
Vitters barely got his professional feet wet in 2007, so he didn’t get to show his wide array of offensive skills, but he should hit for average and plenty of power. He makes good, consistent contact and has an advanced approach at the plate, especially for a high schooler. Vitters’ glove is definitely behind his bat, but he has the tools necessary to become a capable third baseman. He worked extremely hard on his defensive skills at instructs to make himself a more complete player.

31. Chris Marrero
Team: Nationals
Position: OF
Bats: R
Throws: R
The kid can flat-out hit. He can hit for both average and power and should also draw a fair number of walks with his excellent approach at the plate, especially for someone so young. A converted third baseman, his outfield play was fine, flashing a decent arm from left field. He’s never going to be a threat to steal bases.
That bat will get Marrero to the big leagues in a hurry. The Nats’ system is deeper than it’s been in the past, but Washington won’t get in Marrero’s way. He won’t turn 20 until July, but look for him at the upper levels of the Minors in short order, with a September callup a possibility.
32. Reid Brignac
Team: Rays
Position: SS
Bats: L
Throws: R
He spent all of 2007 in the Southern League and while the overall numbers weren’t as good as in the previous year, there’s still a lot to like about the young shortstop. Though his batting average suffered — largely because of a two-month slump — he still had 52 extra-base hits and stole 15 bases. Perhaps more impressively, his defense improved greatly, and questions about his ability to remain a shortstop have subsided.

33. Andy LaRoche
Team: Dodgers
Position: 3B
Bats: R
Throws: R
He has the ability to hit for both average and power, as evidenced by his .524 career slugging percentage and .374 on-base percentage in the Minor Leagues. In the second half of 2007, he may have been the hottest hitter in the Minors, though it didn’t translate into big-league success. Defensively, he’s got good hands and more than enough range and arm to stick at third.

34. Joey Votto
Team: Reds
Position: 1B
Bats: L
Throws: R
The left-handed-hitting first baseman can hit for average and power. He’ll also draw a lot of walks and get on base. While not speedy, he’s not a bad base-runner and is able to swipe a base or two. His defense lags behind his bat and he’ll likely never wow anyone with his glove at first, though he added versatility by playing some left field in 2007.

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:44 am

How is Robert a troll for stating an opinion about mid-level prospects in the Yankees farm system? Its just the truth; not every single player the Yankees field this season in Scranton, Trenton, Charleston, Tampa, and beyond, will have some profound effect for the team in NY… most of these players will never become anything, and some of these players should be used to acquire talent that can definately help the big league club.

its fun to root for the kids, but lets at least be somewhat honest here.

January 17th, 2008 at 12:54 am

I wish had the same sense of arrogance that the people who assume the greatness of our prospects do. Unfortunately, I dont believe that Alan Horne, Jeff Marquez and Ian Kennedy are all going to be so great that we can afford to miss out on Johan Santana to keep them.

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Re: The Minneapolis Star Tribune

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:54 am

I'm just laughing because I have no idea really. I think it sounds like enough at this point, but I'm not convinced it can "get it done" because all it takes is the Yankees giving in and offering Kennedy.


In addition to Jeff Marquez,Melky Cabrera, and the newly apparently unavailable Phil Hughes

I'm just laughing because I have no idea really. I think it sounds like enough at this point, but I'm not convinced it can "get it done" because all it takes is the Yankees giving in and offering Kennedy.

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