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Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:47 am

Chris Garcia


I thought this was cool, a post from Patrick over at PP:

Quote:
I thought I'd share this quote from Alan Horne on Christian Garcia to give another perspective on what kind of potential we're talking about here, worthy of being ranked at least as high as we have him:

"Stuff-wise he's unbelievable. He's as talented, if not more, than anybody I've ever seen - really. It's just the ease of what he does, it's the explosiveness of his fastball, his breaking stuff - obviously everybody knows how good that is - and his changeup is great, it's unbelievable.

"If he's somebody who can tie it all together after those injuries, he's going to run through this organization in no time. He's got special, special stuff and there aren't many guys in the big leagues that have his kind of stuff.

"When you talk about those really special guys, a Josh Beckett for example or Johan Santana, there's not many guys in the big leagues with legit swing-and-miss in-the-zone stuff. There's not too many guys where it's a 1-2 count and you know you're getting a breaking ball more than likely and they can throw it for a strike and get guys to swing and miss. He has that type of stuff, he really, really does."

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:49 am

Can you imagine?

Garcia
Joba
Hughes
Wang
Horne/Kennedy

or

Garcia
Joba
Hughes
Wang
Betances/Brackman





Dare I say, at 75% of expectations............best rotation ever? Even without a lefty in Yankee stadium?

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:55 am

Prospect Profile: Christian Garcia (#Cool



Age: 21
Height: 6'4"
Weight: 205 lbs
Drafted: 3rd Round in 2004 out of High School
Position: Starting Pitcher
Throws: Right

Fastball: Garcia has a plus fastball, sitting at 93-94 mph most of the time with some late movement. He can throw very hard, topping out at 97, and when he finally gets healthy he should throw even harder. He is a big guy who should have more muscle than he current has.

Curveball: Christian Garcia has the second best curveball in the Yankee system, second only to Phil Hughes, which is probably damning him with faint praise. His curveball is absolutely excellent, a near plus-plus pitch. He controls is very well and uses it to finish off batters.

Changeup: Garcia throws a circle change, and it has become another plus pitch for him. It gets down to 81 mph and is thrown from the exact same arm slot as his two other pitches. He uses it very effectively to get ahead in the count along with his fastball.

Command: Prior to this season, command was Garcia's issue. Although injuries limited him to only 54 innings, he made huge strides in that department. He walked just 16 during that time, while striking out 60. He had previously walked about twice that many in 2005. His command of all three pitches improved to the point that he may be primed for a major breakout.

Performance: Garcia had a mixed 2005, posting a 3.91 ERA for Charleston in 106 innings, striking out 103 while walking 53. He suffered from an oblique strain and some arm problems to begin 2006, landing him in extended spring training. He spent 5 games rehabbing in the Gulf Coast league, and was promoted to Charleston despite a 9.53 ERA (He struck out 15 in 11.1 innings and walked 4). He did very well there, posting a 3.46 ERA in 41.2 innings. He is currently making up for lost time in the Hawaiian league, pitching 20.2 innings with a 3.05 ERA and 23 strikeouts, although he walked 14.

2007 Outlook: Garcia is headed for Tampa, where he will enter a packed Yankee rotation. With his newfound command, we should expect nothing less than excellence. He has the stuff to move quickly throughout Tampa and Trenton, and could be in the major league picture as soon as mid-2008. He has that kind of stuff.

Health: The Yankees seem pretty confident that Garcia's arm problems are not going to linger. The muscle strains should go away. That said, Garcia was mysterious scratched and removed from the roster in Hawaii last week, and no one seems to know why. Maybe he is injured, or maybe there is some other personal excuse. We'll have to see if Garcia's arm can handle a workload larger than the 110 innings or so that he has been aksed to pitch so far. C

Ceiling: The common saying is that Garcia has the highest ceiling of any Yankee pitching prospect, even more than Phil Hughes. I don't disagree that he has a high ceiling, but I rate both Betances and Hughes higher, which is not a knock on Garcia. His stuff is certainly good enough to win a few Cy Youngs somewhere down the line. A

Reaching his ceiling: Garcia's injuries are troubling, and I am not sure what to think of them. On one hand, a lot of people seem to be optimistic. On the other hand, this mysterious exit from Hawaii is alarming. If Garcia's improvements in command and control are real, we should be very optimistic. If not, then Garcia will forever struggle with his ability to prevent walks.

Comparison: John Lackey. Garica and Lackey both combine a killer, live fastball with amazing curveballs. The changeup seems hardly neccessary when looking at their breaking stuff. Garcia's career will be determined by how close to Lackey's command he gets.

My take: I like Garcia, although he gives me a lot of reasons to be skeptical. A full, healthy season at Tampa where he does not walk the ballpark could propel him to top prospect status in all of the minors. Until then, I will cautiously say he is better than guys like Duncan or Montero, along with more advanced pitchers like Marquez. Maybe he'll be #3 or so if I do these rankings again next year.

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:57 am

One Season out of 1000 (SG)

Christian Garcia, 19, RHP

While I found the Yankees selection of Jon Poterson in the ’04 draft to be indefensible, I was both surprised and pleased with them picking up Garcia. I had not heard much about Garcia before draft day, but all I needed to know, and found out quickly, was that he threw hard and had very little mileage on his arm due to only pitching his senior year of high school. The Yankees were able to sign Garcia quickly and send him to the GCL for some work.

Garcia’s inexperience was easy to locate as he struggled with walks, 4.0 per 9 innings during the GCL regular season, many of which stemmed from inconsistent curveball command. The other side of that is that when he did command his curveball, GCL hitters stood little to no chance. In addition, walking a lot of hitters did not stop Garcia from running up excellent strikeout totals, 11.1 per 9 innings to be exact. As the season went on, the GCL coaches gained enough confidence in the pitching newcomer to allow him to hold the role of number 1 starter for the postseason and it worked out for everyone since the GCL Yankees ended up as league champions.

The lanky RHP’s success and ability to overcome being new to the pitching aspect of baseball can be credited entirely to a right arm with loads of natural talent. Though he is still lanky and has room for physical maturation, Garcia’s fastball already sits in the low 90s and he reportedly hit 97 in the playoffs, according to Pinstripes Plus. In addition, some scouts feel that he could eventually sit in the upper 90s as a relief pitcher or in the mid 90s as a starter, with the occasional 100 thrown in. As if that’s not impressive enough, some scouts see Garcia’s out pitch, the curveball, as major league average right now. His development with this pitch should only be aided by the Yankees recent decision to emphasize the development of a pitcher’s fastball, curveball, and changeup before anything else. With the rest of his arsenal being as effective/dominant as it was in the past calendar year, Garcia had little incentive to utilize the changeup. However, the progress he has made with this pitch during the offseason will determine whether his final line in ’05 makes him look like a future dominant reliever or a future front of the rotation starter.

Garcia’s ’04 GCL performance was somewhat similar to what Abel Gomez did at the level in ’03, though Garcia did admittedly outperform Gomez, and they do at least hold the similarity of good fastballs. From what I’ve seen reported, Garcia probably has better control of his and has a much better breaking pitch as scouts already feel his curveball will be an outstanding out pitch. All this leads me to believe that Garcia should get the job done, with relative ease, for Charleston in ’05. My only concern is that more so than others his transition to full season ball could see him suffer through some dead arm towards season’s end due to his inexperience.

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:14 pm

Patriots' Wilfork fined $5,000 for face-mask infraction against Chargers


http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=3215704

By Len Pasquarelli
ESPN.com
(Archive)

Updated: January 26, 2008, 11:43 AM ET

For the fourth time this season, New England Patriots nose tackle Vince Wilfork has been sanctioned by the league, with the latest instance a $5,000 fine for a face-mask penalty in last week's AFC Championship Game victory over the San Diego Chargers.

Vince Wilfork

Wilfork

Wilfork called the fine -- first reported by The Boston Globe and confirmed by league and team sources -- "ridiculous," and suggested he will appeal the punishment.

"I don't want to get into it [publicly] with the NFL," Wilfork said. "They'll probably fine me or suspend me [for criticism]. That's something I'll have to take care of in the offseason."

The fourth-year veteran was fined for a play that occurred with about five minutes remaining in the first quarter last Sunday. On first-and-10 from the New England 40, Chargers running back Michael Turner carried over left guard for five yards, and Wilfork grabbed his face mask as he attempted to make the tackle.

Wilfork drew a 15-yard personal foul penalty, and the Chargers gained a first down at the Patriots 20-yard line. The possession culminated in a 26-yard field goal by Nate Kaeding, giving the Chargers a 3-0 lead.

His biggest fine of the season, for $15,000, came in the regular-season finale against the New York Giants, when he poked his finger in the face of tailback Brandon Jacobs. The Giants' tailback referenced the play earlier this week when asked about his motivation for the rematch against the Patriots in Super Bowl XLII.

Wilfork allowed that the play was "stupid," and said he didn't appeal the fine.

In earlier incidents this season, Wilfork was fined $5,000 for drawing an unsportsmanlike conduct foul during the Oct. 14 game at Dallas, when he tangled with Cowboys tight end Jason Witten.

He also drew a $12,500 fine for a low hit on Buffalo Bills quarterback J.P. Losman during a Sept. 23 game. On that play, in which Wilfork appeared to drive his arm into Losman's knee, Losman suffered a sprained knee ligament that sidelined him for two games.

He appealed both those sanctions, and the fine for the Losman hit was reduced by $2,500.

Len Pasquarelli is a senior NFL writer for ESPN.com.

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:17 pm

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/playoffs07/columns/story?columnist=wickersham_seth&id=3214657

Learning from history could help the Giants make history

OK, Giants, listen up. We here at Upsetters Inc. want to bring your goals to reality. And we know what you want on Super Sunday: To follow the 1990 Giants, 1997 Broncos and 2001 Patriots as underdogs-turned-champs. Well, lucky for you, we've already got a Dos and Don'ts blueprint to victory.

Well, not quite. Actually, for the first time since 1972, there are no Dos.

See, that's the problem with playing the 18-0 Patriots. You can't name any surefire keys to beating them because no one has. But we do know what you shouldn't do. So just make sure a check is by each one of the following and, come Feb. 3, you might be pulling confetti from your hair.

Don't say anything stupid. Steelers safety Anthony Smith and Chargers defensive end Igor Olshansky are examples 1 and 1A of what happens when you pop off and slight the Patriots before kickoff. Look, we know it's tempting to speak your mind, maybe even pull a Joe Willie, especially with all the cameras around. But keep stroking the Patriots, tough as it may be. The best way to handle being two-touchdown underdogs is to ride with it. Memorize these:

"We are facing the best coach, quarterback, and team in NFL history. We just hope it's close."

"Tom Brady doesn't need two feet to beat us."

"I don't blame the oddsmakers. I would have made the spread 17."

See, Giants, this is exactly what the Broncos did against the Packers. They put the spotlight on them all week and didn't give Mike Holmgren any material. Ditto with the 2001 Patriots.

Don't

assume that the Patriots will underprepare. New England knows every in-game scenario because it has practiced each one. You know that punt against the Chargers that Kelley Washington downed inside the 5-yard line? "We've practiced it probably 100 times," he says. Before the San Diego game, Washington and punter Chris Hanson stayed after practice to work on that exact drill. Remember, New York: The Pats won't hand you anything. You have to earn it.

Don't

expect the Patriots to break. This is as tight a team as the NFL has ever seen. After each practice, Brady brings everyone together and leads a "Super Bowl" chant on the count of three. Usually, this stuff is for high school and college. Most NFL teams don't end practice with a cheer. But the Patriots do. No wonder Bill Belichick says they "love" one another. If you expect them to turn on each other if the going gets bad, you're mistaken.

Don't

forget the Giants-Bills Super Bowl. In 1991, the lunch-pail Giants faced the high-flying, fancy Bills. The Giants' defensive game plan -- hatched by Belichick, of course -- was to allow Thurman Thomas to gain 100-plus yards. The logic was this: Knowing that the Giants would struggle against the pass, Belichick told his team to let the Bills gain yardage, luring them into believing they truly controlled the line of scrimmage. Belichick figured it would shorten the game and keep the ball out of Jim Kelly's hands. Then, on third-and-short, he believed the Giants could rise up and stuff the Bills.

Well, that scheme worked. Barely.

Of course it's risky, but the Giants might do well to use Belichick's ideas against his Patriots. Think about it: Would you rather have Laurence Maroney running or Brady passing? Give Maroney some yards. Just stiffen up on third down.



Note to Eli Manning (left): Remember to continue to embrace Plaxico Burress (right) as a huge part of your game plan on Super Bowl Sunday.
forget Terrell Davis. Before the Packers-Broncos Super Bowl, nobody thought the Broncos, with the lightest offensive line in the NFL, would be able to run on DT Gilbert Brown and the Packers. Guess what? They tried anyway, and Davis went around and through the Packers as if they were slalom poles and won the game's MVP honors. The point is to play to your strength. Stick with what got you here. Don't assume just because the Patriots have two weeks to prepare for you that they'll have every equation solved. That means making Plaxico Burress a huge part of the game plan, not assuming the Patriots will eliminate him.

Don't

give New England's receivers a clean release. Yeah, we saw what happened to Corey Webster in the NFC Championship when he tried to jam Donald Driver and whiffed: Driver caught a 90-yard touchdown. But it didn't cost you the game.

Don't get frightened by the big play. See how Randy Moss, Wes Welker, Donte' Stallworth, and Kevin Faulk -- especially Faulk -- do when they're punished.

That's what the 2001 Patriots did against the Rams, and Isaac Bruce and Torry Holt struggled until the fourth quarter, when it was too late. Rough up New England's pass-catchers a little. Their pain is your friend.

Don't
get conservative. You're not going to beat the Patriots with field goals. Just ask the Chargers. Don't forget the lessons of UC Berkeley professor David Romer: Field position is overrated. Going for it on fourth down isn't.

That should do it, Giants. Good luck. Oh, wait -- we thought of one Do.

Pray.

Seth Wickersham is a senior writer for ESPN The Magazine and a columnist for ESPN.com.

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:39 pm

1.26.2008 Ca$h strikes back

The Yankee GM actually was a guest lecturer, joined onstage by his Red Sox counterpart Theo Epstein, at William Patterson University in Wayne, N.J. And the mostly partisan Yankee crowd - about 1,000 fans who paid $37 apiece and packed an auditorium to hear the rivals talk baseball. (Source)

Cash on Santana:

"My strong recommendation is we stick with our young pitching staff and keep it in-house," Cashman said to rousing applause. "That's my recommendation, and we've fought hard to take one step back to take two giant steps forward." (Source)

On Bernie Williams and also Joe Torre's nepotism:

While retracing Bernie Williams’s unfriendly departure from the Yankees, Cashman said Williams had become more involved in his music “and that took away from his play” and that Williams had a “terrible season” in 2005. Cashman added Joe Torre had played Williams “ahead of guys who could help us win” in 2006, a reference to Melky Cabrera. (Source)

On the rise of Hank & Hal:

Since Hank and Hal Steinbrenner, George’s sons, have assumed more prominent roles with the team, Cashman has conceded his job has evolved. (Source)

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:39 pm

01.26.2008 A.P. Steinbrenner

Once again proving that he has the media on speed dial, Hank "AP" Steinbrenner continued his unprofessional ways by giving a two-hour interview (that's right, two hours) marked by threats and ego-boosting.

"I will be patient with the young pitchers and players. There's no question about that because I know how these players develop," he said. "But as far as missing the playoffs - if we miss the playoffs by the end of this year, I don't know how patient I'll be. But it won't be against the players. It won't be a matter of that. It will be a matter of maybe certain people in the organization could have done something else." (Source)

Classy comments to make before the season, Hank. Could you alienate anyone else in the organization?

Steinbrenner has become more the voice of the Yankees than Bob Sheppard, speaking out on possible trades and signings, ruminating each week on the status of talks to acquire Johan Santana from the Minnesota Twins.

"I don't particularly necessarily enjoy it. It was kind of thrust upon me. At some point, if you're going to be a leader, you've got to step up and you can't hide in the office," he said. "Unless it can directly affect negotiations, the fans do deserve to know what's going on. There's no problem with that. Whether other people have a problem with that, I really don't give a damn. They don't buy the tickets, all right?" (Source)

Hey Hank, we're fans. We buy the tickets. And we think your non-stop commentary is obnoxious, embarrassing, and arrogant. Real bad boys move in silence.

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:43 pm

http://www.nypost.com/seven/01262008/sports/yankees/cashman__johans_not_the_key_122131.htm

"My strong recommendation is we stick with our young pitching staff and keep it in-house," Cashman said to rousing applause. "That's my recommendation, and we've fought hard to take one step back to take two giant steps forward."

Epstein nodded in agreement, but it's not quite clear if the Red Sox GM was sharing Cashman's view or just happy to hear his division rival wants to pass on acquiring Santana.

At times, the two were remarkably candid, from Cashman admitting Johnny Damon and Bobby Abreu were not in shape last spring to Epstein saying he regretted the rash trade he made two years ago, when he sent promising reliever Cla Meredith to the Padres to reacquire backup catcher Doug Mirabelli, after Mirabelli's replacement Josh Bard had a rough game handling Tim Wakefield's knuckleball.

During a question-and-answer session, a fan asked each GM whom he would take from the other's team if given the chance. Cashman picked Jason Varitek, noting he'd like to take the catcher and "put him [on] another planet," to cripple the Red Sox.

Who would Epstein pluck from the Yankees?

"I'd take the gentleman on my left," Epstein said, motioning to Cashman, "and make him [our] scouting director."



^^^^ I think someone is starting to get nervous about the tusami that is coming.


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/26/sports/baseball/26baseball.html?ref=sports

While retracing Bernie Williams's unfriendly departure from the Yankees, Cashman said Williams had become more involved in his music "and that took away from his play" and that Williams had a "terrible season" in 2005. Cashman added Joe Torre had played Williams "ahead of guys who could help us win" in 2006, a reference to Melky Cabrera.

^^^^ I dont think people realize how often Torre & Cashman butted heads last year

Nieves instead of Pratt out of spring training
Henn instead of Villone out of spring training
Bernie not given a contract because the GM knew he would get too much playing time due to favortism
Trading Torre's security blanket Proctor & cutting Torre favorite Myers after Edwar's non usage
The infamous Joba rules
Mussina to the bullpen in favor of Kennedy

For the first time Cashman was exerting his will on Torre concerning roster decisions.

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:45 pm

From: THEGOOSE

Date: 2008-01-26T19:36:06

2007 Season
Team League AVG G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI TB BB SO SB CS OBP SLG OPS
YAN GCL .280 33 107 13 30 6 0 3 19 45 12 18 0 0 .366 .421 .786
Minors .280 33 107 13 30 6 0 3 19 45 12 18 0 0 .366 .421 .786



Age: 17
Height: 6'3"
Weight: 220
Drafted: Signed out of Venezuela in 2006 for 2 million dollars
Position: Catcher (for now)
Bats: Right

Batting: Jesus Montero is 16 years old. Jesus Montero's bat is now. His bat is among the best to come out of Latin America in history. He has 80 power on a 20-80 scale, which means he has the potential to hit 40+ home runs at the major league level. He has an advanced approach at the plate, meaning that he knows how to select his pitch. We are unsure about his strikeout and walk potential due to his lack of professional experience to this point. It is very difficult to judge too much about Montero at this stage in his development. The Yankees are already adjusting his swing to allow him to hit for power to all fields, which is something usually reserved for prospects much older than Montero.

Defense: Montero is a catcher. We know that. He probably will not remain a catcher. Montero has a few things going against him. First off, he is a big guy. At 16 years old, he will probably be larger than 6'3" 220 lbs by the time he reaches the majors. Catchers simply cannot survive at 240+ lbs. Second, he is no Joe Mauer. His defensive abilities are extremely raw and may or may not develop in to a good defensive catcher, but right now he doesn't show a lot of finesse behind the plate. The Yankees plan to keep him at catcher now, but Montero could end up a 1st baseman when all is said and done. If he does remain a catcher, his offense will be magnified tenfold.

Performance: Montero has not played any serious professional ball so far. He did hit a home run in his first professional game though.

2007 Outlook: There are two options for Montero. He could go to Charleston as a 17 year old, or he could be sent to the Gulf Coast League. I believe that Montero will not end up in Charleston. He is still learning English and the catching position, two traits that you do not want handling prize prospects such as McAllister and Betances. Montero is so incredibly young that rushing him could have poor effects. He will probably be sent to extended spring training and the GCL Yankees, where his bat will dominate. All of this said, if the Yankees decided to move him away from the catcher position, he will almost certainly be sent to Charleston. It seems a little early to do that though. When you hear things in interviews like "He hits like a big leaguer right now", you do expect prospects to be a little more rushed than expected.

Health: Montero is so young that nothing substantive can be said about his health. Incomplete.

Ceiling: The sky is the limit for Montero (a phrase that will certainly come up a lot with the next few propsects). I don't care what position he plays, because his bat has enough power to play him anywhere. A+.

Reaching his ceiling: He is so da mn young that again nothing substantive can be said about it, except that power is traditionally the last tool to develop in a prospect. If he already has major league power, he is in good shape. Plate discipline will determine a lot for Montero. 20% Chance of reaching the majors.

Comparison: Again, it is way to early to compare him to anyone. He certainly has the ability to match or beat Javy Lopez's 2003 or some of Posada's best years.

My take: Some people would rate Montero a bit higher. I certainly agree with them that his ceiling is unlimited, but I cannot rate a 16 year old who never has played in the minor leagues higher than some of the guys on this list. He could very well be the #1 prospect in the Yankee system a year from now. He probably has more potential than even Tabata.

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:53 pm

Let The Fun Begin

Ernie Palladino
January
26

Just had a fun, fun interview with Giants vice president Steve Tisch on the practice field. The Hollywood producer told us that many celebrities expect to make the trip from Los Angeles to Phoenix either for the tail end of the week or at least for the game. I’m hoping Cameron Diaz is one of them. I asked Steve if he could get me a date with her, and he told me she actually thought of that first. How excited am I?

Anyway, we got to talking about how the Giants’ playoff run has been like a movie. So I asked him who he would cast in various roles. Here’s his list. Tell me if you agree.

Tom Coughlin—Ed Harris
Eli Manning—Leonardo DiCaprio
Michael Strahan—Will Smith
Antonio Pierce—Jamie Foxx
Yours truly—Peter Falk

Just to put your minds at ease, I told him emphatically that if I play myself, I won’t do nude—unless I get paid extra. He seemed disappointed.

Talking about getting paid, he said extension talks with Coughlin would happen “organically.”

“There’s no pressure on us now,” Tisch said. “If things go well Sunday, he’ll certainly be enjoying the benefits of victory.”

Not that Coughlin needs to win the Super Bowl to get a healthy extension, though. Win or lose, he’ll be signing a new deal “over the next few weeks,” according to Tisch.

And he doesn’t expect a major hangup in the talks, either.
“Put it this way, of the things I’m worried about, that’s not one of them,” Tisch said.

Okay. Gotta get ready for my closeup.

Ciao for now.

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Re: Chris Garcia

Post  RedMagma on Sat Jan 26, 2008 12:58 pm

From Sosh

Idiot Redsox Fan Harry Hopper says


A-Rod re-signs? check
Torre replaced with a prick manager? check
Pitiable, demented owner succeeded by his blowhard boys? check


Ah, so nice to have the Yanks going back to being hateable.

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