Hank On Santana To Mets

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Re: Hank On Santana To Mets

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 31, 2008 1:23 pm

Keith Law- and Kevin Goldstein just released their own Top 100 prospects of 2008

NY Yankees Prospects

http://insider.espn.go.com/mlb/insider/columns/story?columnist=law_keith&id=3221365

Joba Chamberlain

3) You may have heard of this fellow. Best known to big league fans as a dominant setup guy, Chamberlain is best cast as a four-pitch starter who projects as a true No. 1 starter. He has a four-pitch repertoire where all pitches project as average or better: a plus 94-98 mph four-seamer, a toxic 83-87 mph slider with good tilt and variable break, an 11/5 curveball with good depth, and a straight 81-84 mph changeup with good arm speed. The fastball and slider are already big league out pitches and in relief, he can probably get away without the other two pitches. Chamberlain has a great pitcher's build with broad shoulders and the height to get good downhill plane on his pitches, and his arm is quick. He's battled his weight in the past, leading to knee trouble, and he had bicep tendinitis in college that allowed him to fall to the Yankees in the supplemental round.




Jose Tabata

21)Tabata was in the top 10 last year, but a nagging hamate injury ended his 2007 season early, requiring surgery in August. Tabata has a quick bat and great hand-eye coordination, and he squares up balls as well as anyone on this list. He also has good pitch recognition, although that can manifest itself in working the count to get to a fastball he can drive. His raw power hasn't shown up in games, which could be explained by the hamate injury; hand and wrist injuries sap power, and full recovery from a broken hamate bone can take up to a year. Tabata can play center but has been bumped to right field by fellow Yankee prospect Austin Jackson (No. 24), and Tabata should be plus there with an above-average arm. He'd rank higher if the hamate problem was fully behind him, but until that becomes clear, there's still some risk here.




#24) Austin Jackson
Jackson is my favorite kind of hitting prospect -- the athlete with a clue. Jackson was a top basketball prospect in high school, but the Yankees flexed their financial muscles and gave him first-round money in the eighth round, a move that looks brilliant in hindsight because of how advanced Jackson is for a multi-sport prospect. Jackson has good speed, a solid-average arm in center and good instincts on fly balls, but still has some work to do at the plate. His setup is excellent and his path to the ball is short, but he needs to continue working on keeping his weight back to get more power from the contact he makes, and he's too eager to chase the ball up. He's a potential middle-of-the-order bat because of his power and improving plate discipline.



#45) Ian Kennedy

Kennedy's stuff alone would put him in the lower reaches of this list. He is here because he has superb command of average or fringe-average stuff, so superb that he is going to succeed in the majors where many guys with superior stuff will fail. He works with a fringe-average fastball that touches 90 mph on occasion but mostly falls in the 87-88 mph range, and he commands it to all four edges of the zone. His best secondary pitch is his changeup, slightly above average with some tailing action, but it works extremely well because he keeps his arm speed consistent. His curve is solidly average as well. Kennedy repeats his delivery as well as any prospect on this list, commands all of his pitches and has a great feel for pitching. With plus stuff, he would be in the top 10 overall, but with his stuff, he will have to settle for an upside as a borderline No. 3 starter or a great No. 4 starter.



100) Andrew Brackman

Brackman is out for 2008 after elbow surgery, but he was one of the best amateur prospects in the country heading into last spring. He gets great downhill plane on a 91-97 mph fastball and shows signs of a plus breaking ball, with clean mechanics for someone so tall. His major league contract works against him.


Here's other version from Baseball Prospectus Kevin Goldstein Top 100 Prospects

The Best of the Best

http://baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=7092

#4 Joba Chamberlain,

#34. Ian Kennedy

# 47. Austin Jackson

#48. Jose Tabata

#67. Alan Horne, rhp, Yankees


I'm glad that Cashman did the right for not trading Young prospects for Santana.

RedMagma

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Re: Hank On Santana To Mets

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 31, 2008 1:26 pm

Keith Law- and Kevin Goldstein just released their own Top 100 prospects of 2008

NY Yankees Prospects

http://insider.espn.go.com/mlb/insider/columns/story?columnist=law_keith&id=3221365

Joba Chamberlain

3) You may have heard of this fellow. Best known to big league fans as a dominant setup guy, Chamberlain is best cast as a four-pitch starter who projects as a true No. 1 starter. He has a four-pitch repertoire where all pitches project as average or better: a plus 94-98 mph four-seamer, a toxic 83-87 mph slider with good tilt and variable break, an 11/5 curveball with good depth, and a straight 81-84 mph changeup with good arm speed. The fastball and slider are already big league out pitches and in relief, he can probably get away without the other two pitches. Chamberlain has a great pitcher's build with broad shoulders and the height to get good downhill plane on his pitches, and his arm is quick. He's battled his weight in the past, leading to knee trouble, and he had bicep tendinitis in college that allowed him to fall to the Yankees in the supplemental round.




Jose Tabata

21)Tabata was in the top 10 last year, but a nagging hamate injury ended his 2007 season early, requiring surgery in August. Tabata has a quick bat and great hand-eye coordination, and he squares up balls as well as anyone on this list. He also has good pitch recognition, although that can manifest itself in working the count to get to a fastball he can drive. His raw power hasn't shown up in games, which could be explained by the hamate injury; hand and wrist injuries sap power, and full recovery from a broken hamate bone can take up to a year. Tabata can play center but has been bumped to right field by fellow Yankee prospect Austin Jackson (No. 24), and Tabata should be plus there with an above-average arm. He'd rank higher if the hamate problem was fully behind him, but until that becomes clear, there's still some risk here.




#24) Austin Jackson
Jackson is my favorite kind of hitting prospect -- the athlete with a clue. Jackson was a top basketball prospect in high school, but the Yankees flexed their financial muscles and gave him first-round money in the eighth round, a move that looks brilliant in hindsight because of how advanced Jackson is for a multi-sport prospect. Jackson has good speed, a solid-average arm in center and good instincts on fly balls, but still has some work to do at the plate. His setup is excellent and his path to the ball is short, but he needs to continue working on keeping his weight back to get more power from the contact he makes, and he's too eager to chase the ball up. He's a potential middle-of-the-order bat because of his power and improving plate discipline.



#45) Ian Kennedy

Kennedy's stuff alone would put him in the lower reaches of this list. He is here because he has superb command of average or fringe-average stuff, so superb that he is going to succeed in the majors where many guys with superior stuff will fail. He works with a fringe-average fastball that touches 90 mph on occasion but mostly falls in the 87-88 mph range, and he commands it to all four edges of the zone. His best secondary pitch is his changeup, slightly above average with some tailing action, but it works extremely well because he keeps his arm speed consistent. His curve is solidly average as well. Kennedy repeats his delivery as well as any prospect on this list, commands all of his pitches and has a great feel for pitching. With plus stuff, he would be in the top 10 overall, but with his stuff, he will have to settle for an upside as a borderline No. 3 starter or a great No. 4 starter.



100) Andrew Brackman

Brackman is out for 2008 after elbow surgery, but he was one of the best amateur prospects in the country heading into last spring. He gets great downhill plane on a 91-97 mph fastball and shows signs of a plus breaking ball, with clean mechanics for someone so tall. His major league contract works against him.


Here's other version from Baseball Prospectus Kevin Goldstein Top 100 Prospects

The Best of the Best

http://baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=7092

#4 Joba Chamberlain,

#34. Ian Kennedy

# 47. Austin Jackson

#48. Jose Tabata

#67. Alan Horne, rhp, Yankees


I'm glad that Cashman did the right for not trading Young prospects for Santana.




Law HATES Horne. He maintained forever last year that Horne sat 88-91 or 89-92.

So Justin Masterson is Top 60 but Horne doesn't make the cut.

Que?


Remember, Masterson and Lowrie are 5 star players. Both are going to be first ballot HOFers after their first year in the Bigs.

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Re: Hank On Santana To Mets

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 31, 2008 1:28 pm

Top 100 draft prospects are listed here: http://soxprospects.wikispaces.com/2008+Draft+Watch

Mets have 5 picks in the top 100 this year:

#18 (first round pick from Braves for Glavine)
#22 (first round)
#34 (sandwich pick for Glavine)
#64 (second round)
#94 (third round)

This will be a critical draft for Omar to rebuild the farm system. Omar can go in several different directions here: he can take MLB-ready college pitchers in the mold of Humber or Mulvey who can help fill in at the upper levels, or he can draft high-ceiling high school guys as a way to build up potential star power. He can again focus on pitching, or he can look to build up offense, which has basically been depleted to Fernando Martinez and not much else at this point.

Anyway, here are some names I think the Mets should target with their top picks:

1B Brett Wallace, Arizona State
2007 Pac-Ten Player of the Year. 35 HR potential from the left side of the plate, gets the bat on the ball. Fluid swing. Fairly athletic for his size, played more 3B in high school, but does't have the range to stick at the hot corner. Accurate and strong arm.

1B Yonder Alonso, Miami
Great hitter with excllent plate discipline and above average present power. Also has above average speed for a 1B. Excelled in the Cape Cod League in 2007.

2B Jemile Weeks, Miami
Weeks uses his small frame to his advantage, plays a spectacular 2B. Smooth footwork, a nice glove, and a fast release on his throws. At the plate, Weeks is a switch hitter with gap power. Above average speed on the basepaths. Intelligent and fundamental. Brother of Rickie Weeks.

LHP/1B Kyle Long, Belfield HS (VA)
HUGE lefty 1B with plus plus raw power. Extremely athletic for his size, may move to corner OF. Very strong arm with a mid 90s fastball, could also work out as a lefty closer. Father is NFL Hall of Famer Howie Long. Long is also an outstanding football player but at this stage seems to prefer baseball.

RHP Gerrit Cole, Lutheran HS (CA)
Tall righty whose fastball sits around 94-95 mph and tops out at 96. Also mixes in an above average low 80s slider and a 80 mph changeup. Smooth, effortless delivery. Aggresive with the strike zone.

RHP Cody Satterwhite, Ole Miss
6-4 righty flamethrower, fastball sits in mid to high 90s and reaches 100 mph. Some control issues.

RHP Lance Lynn, Mississippi
Large, well built (6-5, 260) righty with great strikeout numbers. Fastball sits around 92-93 mph, tops out at 94, curveball at 76 mph, throws both for strikes. Mixes the two well. Great command. Needs to improve his changeup. Has the potential to become oversized.

RHP Daniel Marrs, James River HS (VA)
Very strong pitcher who still should be able to add some bulk. Three-quarter deceptive delivery. 93-94 mph fastball. Above average split-fingered changeup sits around 83 mph. Low 70s curveball needs some refinement. Very good improving command.

C Petey Paramore, Arizona State
Switch hitting catcher with great power potential and good defensive skills. Nice looking swing, hits to all fields. Defensvely, Paramore has the potential to be an adequate MLB defensive catcher, but his selling point is hi bat at this point. Smart player.

1B Allan Dykstra, Wake Forest
Lefty 1B with a big time power bat. Above average contact, outstanding plate discipline. Not a stolen base threat. Adequate fielder at 1B. Very strong arm. Gets added points for his last name.

OF Jordan Danks, Texas
Athletic lefty bat with high power potential and great speed. Can play all 3 OF positions with excellent range and a good glove. Below average arm.


As you can see, I'd like to see them grab some potential frontline starters and a potential power bat. We'll see what

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