Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

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Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 12:49 pm

Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and greenies

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3171167

There is something different about this. Most big leaguers and recent baseball retirees have been scrambling to distance themselves from the Mitchell report. Some have called on their agents or used a neatly crafted statement to explain away their performance-enhancing drug use. But here comes Shane Monahan out of nowhere to confess, unsolicited, his past misdeeds.

Monahan -- who, in baseball parlance, enjoyed a cup of coffee or two in a couple of short stints with the Seattle Mariners over parts of two seasons in the late 1990s -- wasn't exposed by a loose-lipped former teammate, and his name didn't surface as part of a criminal case. He isn't mentioned anywhere in former Sen. George Mitchell's 409-page report on steroid abuse in baseball, released two weeks ago. As Monahan tells it, he was more than willing to detail the temptations and pressures he faced as a 24-year-old trying to stick in the majors, but Mitchell's gumshoe investigators never called.

Monahan, now 33 and living with his family in Vail, Colo., openly admits to being a juiced player in baseball's steroids era.
He says he used anabolic steroids when he played for the Mariners. He says Deca-Durabolin and Winstrol were his primary enhancers. He says he got them from "guys" who regularly hung around the clubhouse. And he says he regularly used amphetamines, better known around baseball as energy-boosting "greenies."

So here's the question: Why come clean if he didn't have to? Before he contacted ESPN.com, Monahan said his father, Hartland, a one-time NHL winger, posed the same question.

"I've been in minor league and major league clubhouses," Monahan says. "I know the pressures and what goes on. Like I told my dad, it is coming from the perspective of a guy who had to fight for everything I got in the big leagues.

"I'm not a superstar. Nobody remembers who I am. But you know what? I don't want kids from college or kids from high school going through what I had to go through. I certainly don't want my son, 20 years from now, having to be faced with that decision so he could play professional sports."

A decade ago, Monahan came to professional baseball with talent and pedigree, though the pedigree was heavy on the hockey side. His hockey roots go back generations to his great-grandfather, NHL Hall of Famer Howie Morenz; and his grandfather, Bernie "Boom Boom" Geoffrion, father of the slap shot. His uncle, Danny Geoffrion, played for the Montreal Canadians. His cousin, Blake Geoffrion, was a second-round pick of the Nashville Predators.

Monahan, who grew up in the suburbs north of Atlanta, was the ACC's baseball player of the year at Clemson in 1995. In baseball's draft that year, the Mariners selected the speedy outfielder in the second round, passing on notable future big leaguers Carlos Beltran, Sean Casey and Mark Bellhorn to get him. Monahan made it to the big leagues in 1998, playing in 62 games that year. After he appeared in 16 games the next season, he never returned to the majors. He finished with a .235 career batting average.

Monahan says he began taking steroids late in the 1998 season.

"I saw what kind of money it is going to get you," he says. "I had great minor league seasons, but I wanted to stay in the big leagues. I know my teammates and I know guys on other teams are doing it, and they're hitting home runs left and right. And I'm sitting there going, 'All right, well, what I'm going to do?'

Edit: We can't post full articles here. It is against copyright laws. Please just post snippets in the quote box and link back to the original article

Edit 2: Alex Rodriguez was not mentioned a single solitary time in the above posted article. I went to ESPN.com and did a page search for his name. I have changed the title of the thread to indicate the proper title of the


Number one. You are not allowed to post full articles. Come on, there's a thread just below this saying that.

And Number two: A Rod's name is mentioned nowhere in that. nothing about him.

The noose is also closing on Jeter, because Clemens and Pettitte were busted.

Now Jeter is guilty by association, but A-Rod is clean? Are you alright?

I think what he was saying is that nowhere in that article was A-Rod mentioned. Not once. However, Jeterisgreat posted the article that the noose is tightening on A-Rod. Therefore, A-Rod was guilty by association.
So, Nick made the joke that the noose is tightening on Jeter because Andy and Rocket got busted. It was a bit of snarky humor.

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Re: Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:13 pm

Dayn Perry- Red Sox have early '08 edge on Yankees

The Boston Red Sox versus the New York Yankees.

http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/7593472?var=one


Dayn Perry's pick Francona has edge on Girardi

The Yankees lineup are better than Redsox.

The Redsox starting rotation and bullpen over The Yankees






Summon up the most famous sports blood feuds — Michigan-Ohio State, Duke-North Carolina, Colts-Patriots, Bobby Petrino-signed contracts, etc. — and Sox-Yanks is bound to top the list.

What makes this particular rivalry even more compelling is that, after almost a century of relative failure, the Red Sox have finally gotten the better of their loathed I-95 rivals in recent years. In other words, the Yankees own history, but the Red Sox own recent history. And that, of course, brings us to 2008.

Specifically, the matter at hand is which American League East power, the Yankees or Red Sox, figures to hold sway in the division this season? Of course, we're talking about these teams as currently assembled. Pitchers and catchers report in less than two months, but some big names — particularly big names on the trade market — are still out there (i.e., Johan Santana, Erik Bedard and Joe Blanton). Still, for the most part the moves have been made, and the rosters are in place. With that in mind, let's explore on a point-by-point basis which of these storied rivals is best poised to triumph in 2008 ...

The 2007 Season

Last season, of course, the Red Sox won the flag for the first time since 1995 and bested the Yankees by two games in the standings, in addition to winning the World Series. They also had a substantially better run differential than New York. Throw in the fact that the Red Sox had a younger pitching staff and a younger crop of hitters, and it's easy to see that Boston was better in all contexts last season and may be better off going forward. Now let's shift the focus to 2008 ...

The Lineup

This past season, the Red Sox ranked third in the AL in runs scored, while the Yankees topped the loop by a fairly wide margin. On the other hand, the Yankees also had the oldest collection of hitters in the league. Take a glance at their roster, and you'll find that almost all of their core hitters — Alex Rodriguez, Derek Jeter, Jorge Posada, Jason Giambi, Hideki Matsui — are on the wrong side of 30. As such, you can probably expect some degree of statistical decline from each of those players. Of course, the Boston lineup is also on the old side: David Ortiz, Manny Ramirez, Mike Lowell and Jason Varitek are all in their decline phases.

More specifically, the Yanks must concern themselves with getting better production from first base. In 2007, Yankee first basemen combined to hit .284 AVG/.350 OBP/.419 SLG, while the average major-league first baseman authored a batting line of .276 AVG/.357 OBP/.463 SLG. As you can see, the Yankees will need more power from the position in 2008. Fortunately for New York, a regular platoon of Wilson Betemit and Shelley Duncan should give them much more thump. Elsewhere, center field will remain a trouble spot unless Melky Cabrera can improve upon his 2007 numbers.

As for the Red Sox, they should get better with Jacoby Ellsbury in the lineup every day. Julio Lugo and J.D. Drew, who both underperformed last season, should improve somewhat.

Now let's see how the teams compare, solely in terms of offense, on a position-by-position basis:

Who has the edge?
Yankees Red Sox Edge
Catcher Jorge Posada Jason Varitek Yankees, by a lot
First Base Wilson Betemit/Shelley Duncan Kevin Youkilis Red Sox
Second Base Robinson Cano Dustin Pedroia Yankees
Third Base Alex Rodriguez Mike Lowell Yankees, by a lot
Shortstop Derek Jeter Julio Lugo Yankees, by a lot
Left Field Hideki Matsui Manny Ramirez Red Sox
Center Field Melky Cabrera/Johnny Damon Jacoby Ellsbury Red Sox, barely
Right Field Bobby Abreu J.D. Drew Push
DH Jason Giambi/Johnny Damon David Ortiz Red Sox, by a lot

Overall, give the nod to the Yankees offense, although they won't out-score Boston by as hefty a margin as they did in 2007.

The Rotation

This is where things get interesting. Last season, the Red Sox ranked second in the AL in rotation ERA, while the Yankees placed eighth in the 14-team AL.

Going forward, Boston is in good shape. It has an ace in Josh Beckett and six capable starters in the fold, which, of course, means it has exceptional depth. Should Curt Schilling or Tim Wakefield struggle or go down with injury, then Clay Buchholz or Jon Lester can fill the void. On the other hand, those two gifted young arms might pitch their way into the rotation even in the absence of pressing needs. Potentially, this is the best rotation in the AL.

As for the Yankees, it all depends on whether the youngsters step up. In 2008, they'll be without Roger Clemens, but they will have Philip Hughes and Joba Chamberlain in the mix. Both Hughes and Chamberlain are exceptionally talented and have tremendously bright futures. But are they poised to thrive in the here and now? Chances are both will give the Yanks innings and comfortably sub-4.00 ERAs. If one slips up, then the Yanks can turn to Ian Kennedy or perhaps Mike Mussina. Chien-ming Wang and Andy Pettitte make for a formidable top two, and the kids will constitute an improved back end. The Yankees' starting pitching will be significantly better in 2008, but it won't be as good as Boston's.

The Bullpen

The Yanks figure to have issues in this department. Mariano Rivera is still excellent, but the middle-relief corps has been thinned out. Chamberlain is in the rotation, and Luis Vizcaino, who was excellent in the second half of last season, is now in Colorado. Also, the only lefty reliever presently on the roster is Kei Igawa. Igawa figures to put up better numbers in the pen than he did in the rotation, but he's not a known quantity.


Boston, meanwhile, is pretty well set in the bullpen. Jonathan Papelbon is a top-shelf closer, and they've got quality setup arms from both sides. They had one of the best bullpens in the AL last season, and their rotation depth means that Buchholz or Lester will likely be available for relief detail. Consider this a big edge for the Sox.

The Defense

By whatever measure you choose to employ — fielding percentage or more advanced and more useful metrics like Defensive Efficiency and the Plus-Minus System — the Red Sox come out on top. The Yankees have sub-optimal defenders at the outfield corners, shortstop (no, Derek Jeter is not a good fielder), and second base. Boston, however, is above average or better at every position save left field. Another big edge for the Sox.

The Bench

The Yanks boast a solid bench, what with Johnny Damon/Melky Cabrera and Wilson Betemit/Shelley Duncan available for pinch hitting. Boston has less to turn to: most notably, Alex Cora and Coco Crisp. On the other hand, if Brandon Moss' minor-league numbers translate appropriately, then the Sox will be fine. For now, the nod goes to New York. Of course, judging benches is tough to do before 25-man rosters are set coming out of Spring Training.

The Manager

Here's an easy call. Joe Girardi has his merits, certainly, but Terry Francona has two World Series rings in four seasons on the job. The Sox's skipper, in particular, handles the bullpen exceptionally well and has a knack for gaining the platoon advantage. In terms of personality, Francona's an even-keeled sort, and the players obviously respond to his leadership style. Girardi may turn into a great manager, but right now Francona IS a great manager.

The Edge

These are two very good teams, and there's a strong chance that both will wind up in the playoffs. While there's still time for a blockbuster trade to tilt the scales, right now Boston is clearly the better club. The Yanks get the nod on offense — both in terms of starters and in terms of bench talent — but Boston is better in the rotation and in the bullpen, and they also have the better team defense and the better manager. To be sure, another thrilling AL East chase is in the offing, but right now the smart money is on the Boston Red Sox.

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Re: Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 1:14 pm

Dayn Perry- Red Sox have early '08 edge on Yankees

The Boston Red Sox versus the New York Yankees.

http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/7593472?var=one


Dayn Perry's pick Francona has edge on Girardi

The Yankees lineup are better than Redsox.

The Redsox starting rotation and bullpen over The Yankees






Summon up the most famous sports blood feuds — Michigan-Ohio State, Duke-North Carolina, Colts-Patriots, Bobby Petrino-signed contracts, etc. — and Sox-Yanks is bound to top the list.

What makes this particular rivalry even more compelling is that, after almost a century of relative failure, the Red Sox have finally gotten the better of their loathed I-95 rivals in recent years. In other words, the Yankees own history, but the Red Sox own recent history. And that, of course, brings us to 2008.

Specifically, the matter at hand is which American League East power, the Yankees or Red Sox, figures to hold sway in the division this season? Of course, we're talking about these teams as currently assembled. Pitchers and catchers report in less than two months, but some big names — particularly big names on the trade market — are still out there (i.e., Johan Santana, Erik Bedard and Joe Blanton). Still, for the most part the moves have been made, and the rosters are in place. With that in mind, let's explore on a point-by-point basis which of these storied rivals is best poised to triumph in 2008 ...

The 2007 Season

Last season, of course, the Red Sox won the flag for the first time since 1995 and bested the Yankees by two games in the standings, in addition to winning the World Series. They also had a substantially better run differential than New York. Throw in the fact that the Red Sox had a younger pitching staff and a younger crop of hitters, and it's easy to see that Boston was better in all contexts last season and may be better off going forward. Now let's shift the focus to 2008 ...

The Lineup

This past season, the Red Sox ranked third in the AL in runs scored, while the Yankees topped the loop by a fairly wide margin. On the other hand, the Yankees also had the oldest collection of hitters in the league. Take a glance at their roster, and you'll find that almost all of their core hitters — Alex Rodriguez, Derek Jeter, Jorge Posada, Jason Giambi, Hideki Matsui — are on the wrong side of 30. As such, you can probably expect some degree of statistical decline from each of those players. Of course, the Boston lineup is also on the old side: David Ortiz, Manny Ramirez, Mike Lowell and Jason Varitek are all in their decline phases.

More specifically, the Yanks must concern themselves with getting better production from first base. In 2007, Yankee first basemen combined to hit .284 AVG/.350 OBP/.419 SLG, while the average major-league first baseman authored a batting line of .276 AVG/.357 OBP/.463 SLG. As you can see, the Yankees will need more power from the position in 2008. Fortunately for New York, a regular platoon of Wilson Betemit and Shelley Duncan should give them much more thump. Elsewhere, center field will remain a trouble spot unless Melky Cabrera can improve upon his 2007 numbers.

As for the Red Sox, they should get better with Jacoby Ellsbury in the lineup every day. Julio Lugo and J.D. Drew, who both underperformed last season, should improve somewhat.

Now let's see how the teams compare, solely in terms of offense, on a position-by-position basis:

Who has the edge?
Yankees Red Sox Edge
Catcher Jorge Posada Jason Varitek Yankees, by a lot
First Base Wilson Betemit/Shelley Duncan Kevin Youkilis Red Sox
Second Base Robinson Cano Dustin Pedroia Yankees
Third Base Alex Rodriguez Mike Lowell Yankees, by a lot
Shortstop Derek Jeter Julio Lugo Yankees, by a lot
Left Field Hideki Matsui Manny Ramirez Red Sox
Center Field Melky Cabrera/Johnny Damon Jacoby Ellsbury Red Sox, barely
Right Field Bobby Abreu J.D. Drew Push
DH Jason Giambi/Johnny Damon David Ortiz Red Sox, by a lot

Overall, give the nod to the Yankees offense, although they won't out-score Boston by as hefty a margin as they did in 2007.

The Rotation

This is where things get interesting. Last season, the Red Sox ranked second in the AL in rotation ERA, while the Yankees placed eighth in the 14-team AL.

Going forward, Boston is in good shape. It has an ace in Josh Beckett and six capable starters in the fold, which, of course, means it has exceptional depth. Should Curt Schilling or Tim Wakefield struggle or go down with injury, then Clay Buchholz or Jon Lester can fill the void. On the other hand, those two gifted young arms might pitch their way into the rotation even in the absence of pressing needs. Potentially, this is the best rotation in the AL.

As for the Yankees, it all depends on whether the youngsters step up. In 2008, they'll be without Roger Clemens, but they will have Philip Hughes and Joba Chamberlain in the mix. Both Hughes and Chamberlain are exceptionally talented and have tremendously bright futures. But are they poised to thrive in the here and now? Chances are both will give the Yanks innings and comfortably sub-4.00 ERAs. If one slips up, then the Yanks can turn to Ian Kennedy or perhaps Mike Mussina. Chien-ming Wang and Andy Pettitte make for a formidable top two, and the kids will constitute an improved back end. The Yankees' starting pitching will be significantly better in 2008, but it won't be as good as Boston's.

The Bullpen

The Yanks figure to have issues in this department. Mariano Rivera is still excellent, but the middle-relief corps has been thinned out. Chamberlain is in the rotation, and Luis Vizcaino, who was excellent in the second half of last season, is now in Colorado. Also, the only lefty reliever presently on the roster is Kei Igawa. Igawa figures to put up better numbers in the pen than he did in the rotation, but he's not a known quantity.


Boston, meanwhile, is pretty well set in the bullpen. Jonathan Papelbon is a top-shelf closer, and they've got quality setup arms from both sides. They had one of the best bullpens in the AL last season, and their rotation depth means that Buchholz or Lester will likely be available for relief detail. Consider this a big edge for the Sox.

The Defense

By whatever measure you choose to employ — fielding percentage or more advanced and more useful metrics like Defensive Efficiency and the Plus-Minus System — the Red Sox come out on top. The Yankees have sub-optimal defenders at the outfield corners, shortstop (no, Derek Jeter is not a good fielder), and second base. Boston, however, is above average or better at every position save left field. Another big edge for the Sox.

The Bench

The Yanks boast a solid bench, what with Johnny Damon/Melky Cabrera and Wilson Betemit/Shelley Duncan available for pinch hitting. Boston has less to turn to: most notably, Alex Cora and Coco Crisp. On the other hand, if Brandon Moss' minor-league numbers translate appropriately, then the Sox will be fine. For now, the nod goes to New York. Of course, judging benches is tough to do before 25-man rosters are set coming out of Spring Training.

The Manager

Here's an easy call. Joe Girardi has his merits, certainly, but Terry Francona has two World Series rings in four seasons on the job. The Sox's skipper, in particular, handles the bullpen exceptionally well and has a knack for gaining the platoon advantage. In terms of personality, Francona's an even-keeled sort, and the players obviously respond to his leadership style. Girardi may turn into a great manager, but right now Francona IS a great manager.

The Edge

These are two very good teams, and there's a strong chance that both will wind up in the playoffs. While there's still time for a blockbuster trade to tilt the scales, right now Boston is clearly the better club. The Yanks get the nod on offense — both in terms of starters and in terms of bench talent — but Boston is better in the rotation and in the bullpen, and they also have the better team defense and the better manager. To be sure, another thrilling AL East chase is in the offing, but right now the smart money is on the Boston Red Sox.

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Re: Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 2:50 pm

Fox hates the Yanks, at least their experts do. I’m not saying this guy can’t be right but the Yanks should have a better pen, than last year, he has Joba listed as a starter and last we’ve heard that’s still up in the air. And while Jeter has lost something in the field, a bad shortstop he’s not, and to say Julio Lugo’s a better fielder, well I’m thinking Mr. Perry must have been wearing his red sox p.j.’s with the feet in the bottoms.

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Re: Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 2:52 pm

Wallace should throw high and tight with Clemens interview
Wojciechowski

By Gene Wojciechowski
ESPN.com
(Archive)

Updated: December 31, 2007, 3:46 PM ET

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And so it comes to this: An 89-year-old "correspondent emeritus" who adores the New York Yankees, spends quality time in owner George Steinbrenner's stadium suite and considers latest interviewee Roger Clemens "my friend," becomes our best hope to arm wrestle the truth out of the accused pitcher.

No wonder Clemens' reps were hoping that Mike Wallace would be asking the questions for Sunday's "60 Minutes" segment. Clemens got a familiar face (Wallace first interviewed him in 2001), a self-admitted admirer and gobs of prep time for the the make-or-break interview.

Roger Clemens

Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

Roger Clemens will next talk to Mike Wallace in his first post-Mitchell report interview.

Now I get it. This is what Clemens meant when he said he'd talk "at the appropriate time in the appropriate way." In Clemens' damage-control world, that means his first interview will air a full 24 days after the Dec. 13 Mitchell report named him as a steroids and HGH user.

Not too much is at stake. Only Clemens' reputation, his baseball legacy, his place in the Hall of Fame, his records and his word. A 24-season body of often jaw-dropping major league work is under siege.

Through issued statements and a video on his Web site -- all conveniently done from his Texas bunker and without having to deal with any of those annoying reporters -- Clemens has denied the accusations made by former personal trainer Brian McNamee in the Mitchell report. The nutshell version of McNamee's claims: that he injected Clemens with steroids and/or HGH during the 1998, 2000 and 2001 seasons.

Now it's up to CBS's Wallace to try to separate fact from fiction. In essence, the interview becomes Clemens' personal anti-Mitchell report. But even then you have to question Clemens' actions: He declined to discuss the allegations with former Sen. George Mitchell, but he's more than willing to discuss them with Wallace? On national television? And afterward, he's scheduled to conduct a news conference with other reporters? Interesting.

I'm hoping for the best from the interview, which is to say I'm hoping for Wallace's best.

The man has won 21 Emmys and enough journalism awards and honorary degrees to fill half a Wal-Mart. He has a history of fearlessness, and his interview doctrine -- as described in his memoir, "Between You and Me" -- is direct and confrontational. Writes Wallace: "There is no such thing as an indiscreet question."

Wallace once dared to ask Louis Farrakhan if the Nation of Islam leader was responsible for the assassination of Malcolm X. He told Lyndon Johnson that "Vietnam f---ed you, Mr. President, and so, I'm afraid, you f---ed the country." He suggested to Menachem Begin that the Israeli prime minister had much in common with blood enemy Yasir Arafat of the Palestine Liberation Organization. Begin raged at the comparison.

Wallace had the nerve to tell the Ayatollah Khomeini that Egypt's Anwar Sadat described the Iranian cleric as "a lunatic." He has sat across the likes of Panama dictator Manuel Noriega and Watergate dictator H.R. Haldeman. And in February 2005 he interviewed a one-time big league star who had sold his baseball soul for the narcissistic power of steroids.

His name was Jose Canseco.

The symmetry is unavoidable. Wallace and the whistle-blowing/mercenary Canseco in 2005 ... Wallace and the outraged Clemens defending himself against the likes of Canseco in 2008.

For the fans' sake, baseball's sake and even Clemens' sake, we need Wallace to be indiscreet in the interview. We need him to be unrelenting. We need him to have parked his friendship with the seven-time Cy Young winner at the front door.

What we don't need is a touchy-feely version of Oprah, or worse yet, The Chris Farley Show.

Wallace: "Remember that time in 1998, when you were pitching for the Toronto Blue Jays, and you started 6-6, and then all of a sudden you finished 14-0 for the rest of the season, and your ERA dropped from 3.27 to 2.29, and that guy McNamee was your trainer?"

Clemens: "Yeah. So what?"

Wallace: "That was awwwwwwsome."

Rocket numbers

A look at Roger Clemens' statistics, from 1993-96 (his last four seasons with the Boston Red Sox), and 1997-2005.
'93-'96 '07-'05
W-L 40-39 149-61
Win pct. .506 .710
ERA 3.76 3.22
IP per season 186.3 214.3
K per season 179.3 212.4
K per 9 IP 8.66 8.92
WHIP 1.29 1.19

Instead, it would be nice to see vintage Wallace on Sunday night. Not ruthless, but skeptical, dogged, willing to chip away at the outer shell of responses no doubt prepared for Clemens by his handlers.

I'd like to hear him ask why Clemens, if the pitcher has nothing to hide, refused to discuss the steroid and HGH allegations with Mitchell.

I'd like to know why Clemens thinks McNamee would supposedly lie about him in such damning and stunning detail, but tell investigators the absolute truth about Clemens' teammate and workout partner Andy Pettitte.

I'd like to know why Clemens once trusted McNamee so completely, but now lets his lawyer refer to the personal trainer as "a troubled man."

I'd like to know if he thinks Pettitte (and others who have admitted to using performance enhancers) is a cheater.

I'd like to hear Clemens explain what he would do if asked to testify under oath at an upcoming congressional hearing. Or why no lawsuit has been filed if, in fact, Canseco, McNamee or the MLB-commissioned Mitchell report defamed him. Or why Canseco, who has been outing steroid and performance-enhancer users for years, would lie about discussing steroids with Clemens 10 seasons ago.

And, of course, I'd like to know if his team of private investigators will also be working with O.J. Simpson's people.

"60 Minutes" wanted Clemens, and Clemens apparently wanted Wallace. Now that they have each other, let's hope we get something more than a Yankees group hug.

The truth would be a nice start.

Gene Wojciechowski is the senior national columnist for ESPN.com. You can contact him at gene.wojciechowski@espn3.com.

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Re: Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:18 pm

I actually think the #7 is worth more than those charts say, it a nice mix of position (top ten) and salary cap implications...it really depends on the players, if the GM of another team is drooling over someone who's there, then the talking begins.
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#103
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Default Re: SF pick final result: #7 (and 63rd+ 66th, 67th, or 68th)
With a three way tie among KC, Oakland and Atlanta on winning percentage, it may come down to a coin flip to see which is the Oakland Pick in the thrd round that the Pats possess.

How is the Strength of Schedule really determined?

It could be the 3rd 4th or 5th pick in the Third round depending on the order that they select after the flip. (65th, 67th, or 68th). Ideally we would want the Raiders to lose the coin flip; and they would then get promoted to the third pick on the third round for the Pats.

I can hope that the Pats draft picks will be #7, #63rd and #66th and # 95th through three rounds.
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Default Re: SF pick final result: #7
On reflection, I also think that the Patriots should petition Commissioner Roger Goodell for a review and revision of the penalty imposed on them.

Like many other cases and individuals who have had their penalties reduced, they should try. They could make the argument that similar infractions, perhaps even more important, had the precedent set of third round draft pick forfeiture. They could site the cases and the precedent set for the 49ers and Broncos for CAP cheating. They should ask fro a penalty that conforms with established precedents.

If Goodell were to revisit the penalty and take a precedent-conforming penalty of the third round pick draft forfeiture, the Pats could get back their presumed #32 draft pick, and lose their presumed #95 pick.
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Default Re: SF pick final result: #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by AzPatsFan View Post
On reflection, I also think that the Patriots should petition Commissioner Roger Goodell for a review and revision of the penalty imposed on them.

Like many other cases and individuals who have had their penalties reduced, they should try. They could make the argument that similar infractions, perhaps even more important, had the precedent set of third round draft pick forfeiture. They could site the cases and the precedent set for the 49ers and Broncos for CAP cheating. They should ask fro a penalty that conforms with established precedents.

If Goodell were to revisit the penalty and take a precedent-conforming penalty of the third round pick draft forfeiture, the Pats could get back their presumed #32 draft pick, and lose their presumed #95 pick.
I kind of thought the same thing, but already going 16-0 it seems to me a lot of the damage from Spygate is going away. If they go 19-0, the effect will be even more so.

Appealing the penalty would only bring more media attention to the whole thing. I'd rather eat the pick than take the risk of further media trashing.
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Default Re: SF pick final result: #7 (and 63rd+ 66th, 67th, or 68th)
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Originally Posted by AzPatsFan View Post
How is the Strength of Schedule really determined?
Well it is pretty simple, take all the teams with the same win and lose record. Then you take the combined number of wins of all the teams that you played, and divide it by the number of total games those teams played(which should be 256). And then the team who has the lowest percentage would get the earlier pick. Which would make sense since the team with the easiest strength of schedule is basically the worst team and would thus warrent the lower pick.
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Re: Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:22 pm

Re: 2008 Amature Draft
PG's review of Hosmer after his most recent showcase with them:

Quote:
Eric Hosmer is a 2008 1B/P with a 6'4'', 210 lb. frame from Cooper City, FL who attends American Heritage HS. He has a Big League body, with excellent strength and proportions and is in top level shape. Hosmer did nothing in Cincinnati to make anyone question that he is the top hitter in the 2008 class. He is a pure hitter with bat speed, confidence and a very mature ability to adjust to different pitches and make solid contact to all fields. Hosmer realizes he doesn't have to show his light tower power every swing but it's there if he sees his pitch. There haven't been many better in the last generation of high school hitting prospects in our opinion. Lost in the talk about Hosmer's hitting ability as a prospect are his other tools. He is an outstanding defensive first baseman with light feet and soft hands and polished balance round the bag. He threw 92 mph from first in infield drills, which is unheard of from a first baseman, and we've heard he's thrown up to 94 mph this summer from the mound from the left side, although he didn't pitch in Cincinnati. Hosmer has a verbal commmitment to Arizona State but he should be one of the top picks in the 2008 draft if nothing steps in his way. Selected to 2007 Aflac All-American team.

C'mon Boras, work your magic.

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Re: Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:23 pm

I don't know if it has been posted here yet, but Hosmer is with Boras.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snatch Catch
The draft landscape shifts so much as we near the draft. Guys in the top 30 right now won't even be in the top 100 by draft time. Guys who aren't even on the radar right now will move into 1st round/supp round consdieration in June.

Yes definitely. That's exactly why I wanted to see Brackman's pre-draft write up earlier today (which I posted on the previous page). He was a top pick candidate that ended up falling for multiple reasons in the end. Any of these kids could fall by the time the draft comes around. That's where our money/scouting comes into play

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Re: Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner (NOT A-Rod) to steroids and

Post  RedMagma on Mon Dec 31, 2007 3:25 pm

Hopefully Hosmer's agent is Boras and the 29 teams in front of us pass up on him because his price. Or the Phils or Mets sign Schill and give us their 22nd or 24th pick so we can cut in front of the mfy's, because you know they'll give him anything.

PAY WHATEVER TO GET THIS KID!
and were telling teams who they can draft, who t

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