Santana

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:24 pm

NYPD113th January 3rd, 2008 at 4:17 pm

Hey G Love!

Either one of two thing occured with your post. Either A) your prescription needs to be upped on your reading glasses or B) you were in such a rush to rip Gammons, yiou decide to not actually read the chat.

G LOVE, you said:

No small coincidence Gammons pumps up every prospect that the Red Sox have in their proposal to the Twins.

He drops Lester as ďyoung PettiteĒ. Coco as ďbest CF in baseballĒ. Lowrie as ďready to start at SS for the Sox if Lugo faltersĒ.

OK, now, Gammons said:

ďOne of the most interesting thing about the winter meetings was that JOHN FARRELL was passionate about his case for Jon Lester becoming their equivalent of a young Pettitte.

ANDÖÖÖ

ďI could see Billy Beane trading for Crisp and then turning around and trading him before season starts. THE AíS think heís the best defensive center fielder in game right now.Ē

NOW THE DOOZY!

G LOVE, you claim that Gammons said that is ďready to start at SS for the Sox if Lugo faltersĒ.

Can you please point out in his chat where he said this, because I cannot find it. I do see where Gammons said:

ďIf Jed Lowrie is still with them, he should allow them to give Lugo more rest and be a good alternative at SS.Ē

Sounds like heís saying the kid could be a nice backup for the immediate future. Real over-the-top stuff G Love!

So two of the things you claim that Gammons said, other people said, and one thing you decided to make up. Wonderful post G Love.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:43 pm

From what i have seen, this info should give you info on:

1) hot cold zones

2) info that should help on chase, take and miss ratings

3) ratings on each pitcher's pitches (describing velocity, and overall quality of the pitch)

4) spray charts so you can determine if a hitter is a pull/spray hitter, ground ball/fly ball hitter

5) Hitters attributes including power, speeds, throwing strength, throwing accuracy, defensive range, base stealing, etc

I should warn you that they just uploaded this info and some of it appears to be incomplete. Hopefully, everything should be in place by Opening day

EDIT: changed complete to incomplete.




http://www.imagehosting.com/out.php/i1464714_Untitled1.png





kgbaseball:
If it gives solid info on #3 and #5, it could definitely be helpful. I'm not convinced changing hot/cold zones makes a difference in the game.

Also, is it only for major leaguers? Are there obscure minor leaguers too?

Just major leaguers...and not 100% of them..although most of them.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:51 pm

Roy Schuening


Scouts Grade: 83

http://insider.espn.go.com/nfldraft/draft/tracker/player?id=11963

Strengths: Takes sound angles to blocks and generally gets into good position when drive blocking. Tough and works from the snap to the whistle. Big enough to engulf undersized defenders and can wear defenders down over the course of a game. Footwork is sound when combo blocking defensive lineman up to a linebacker and flashes the ability to get into position at the second level. Shows adequate range for size and flashes the ability to pull effectively. Gets adequate knee bend in pass set and holds ground against bull rushers. Doesn't have an explosive first step but is efficient and gets into pass set quickly. Keeps head up and shows good awareness in pass protection.

Weaknesses: Doesn't get great hand placement, frequently fails to extend arms once in position and struggles to sustain blocks. Fails to deliver a violent initial punch, doesn't roll hips upon contact and isn't going to knock many defenders back. Plays too high at times and could struggle to drive two-gap defenders off the ball at the NFL level. Plays with a narrow base, struggles to adjust to the moving target in space and can lose balance. Can't change directions quickly and struggles to adjust to double moves.

Overall: Schuening arrived at Oregon State in 2003. During the next three seasons (2004-'06) he started 37 consecutive games. Schuening lacks ideal athleticism and explosiveness but he is a relentless drive blocker who can hold his own in pass protection.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:53 pm

Clemens 'swears' in interview he's never used banned substances

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3179745

ESPN.com news services

Updated: January 3, 2008, 4:51 PM ET


Roger Clemens says he was injected with "Lidocaine and B-12" and not steroids or human growth hormone by former trainer Brian McNamee, according to a portion of an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" released Thursday.

"Lidocaine and B-12. It's for my joints, and B-12 I still take today," Clemens told Mike Wallace in the interview, which is scheduled to be shown Sunday night. It is Clemens' first interview since the release of the Mitchell report in December.

Lidocaine and B-12. It's for my joints, and B-12 I still take today.

--Roger Clemens in '60 Minutes' interview







In the report, McNamee claims to have injected Clemens with steroids in 1998, 2000 and 2001. He said he injected the seven-time Cy Young winner with HGH in 2000, according to the report.

According to CBS, Clemens calls the accusation that he used steroids and HGH "ridiculous" and says he "never" used any banned substances. The interview was conducted last Friday.

Wallace ask Clemens if he swears he didn't used banned substances. "Swear," Clemens responds.

On Thursday, The New York Times reported that a lawyer for McNamee said he wouuld sue Clemens if he accuses McNamee of lying in the interview.

"He's got a chance to protect himself," Richard D. Emery, a New York-based lawyer who specializes in libel and defamation actions, told The Times. "We're not going to sue him if he doesn't do it. But if he does it, we're going to sue him."

Clemens' lawyer, Rusty Hardin, told The Times his client has nothing to hide.

"I believe a client who's telling the truth should tell the world the truth," he said. Of Clemens' "60 Minutes" appearance, Hardin said, "I think [Clemens] expressed himself very emotionally, and it'll give the viewer a chance to look at Roger and make up their mind."

On Thursday, Hardin added: "In his interview with 60 Minutes Roger told the truth. It is that simple. I encourage Mr. McNamee to watch the program."

Shortly after the Mitchell report's release, Clemens issued denials both through Hardin and in a video posted on his Web site.

"Let me be clear, the answer is no. I did not use steroids or human growth hormone, and I've never done so," Clemens said in the video. "I did not provide Brian McNamee with any drugs to inject into my body. Brian McNamee did not inject steroids or human growth hormones into my body."

McNamee's lawyer, Ed Ward, said in December that "[McNamee] stands 100 percent behind the accuracy of the information he provided to Sen. Mitchell."

Shortly after the report was released, Hardin said: "... I am extremely upset that Roger's name was in this report based on the allegations of a troubled and unreliable witness who only came up with names after being threatened with possible prison time."

Also on Thursday, the New York Daily News reported that Hank Steinbrenner, the New York Yankees' senior vice president, said Clemens will not be back in pinstripes.

"I'm not signing Clemens," Steinbrenner told the Daily News in a telephone interview.

Steinbrenner said the team has Andy Pettitte, who is also mentioned in the Mitchell report and who has admitted using performance enhancing drugs, signed for one season.

"Andy is [signed] for one year and he's only 35 and he knows how to pitch in the big games," Steinbrenner said, according to the Daily News. "Roger does, too, but let's face it, he's going to be 46 [in August].

"Pettitte is just as good with the young pitchers, though Clemens was great with the young kids last year. I don't think Roger is going to come back anyway."

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 2:58 pm

1. YankeeDudel January 3rd, 2008 at 4:37 pm

flax seed oil or vitamin B12?
2. Mike January 3rd, 2008 at 4:38 pm

The first admission. I foresee this as a slippery slope of ďwell yes, butĒ statements from the Clemens camp.
3. Jack Ransovy January 3rd, 2008 at 4:41 pm

Back to the Santana point thereís is no doubt in my mind that the Yankees should wait on this deal if the twins take it fine weíll see if it pays out if they decide to keep him the better for us. On the Cano matter the yankees should sign him to a long deal heís proven himself as a yankee and is about the best 2nd baseman you can get.
4. Stephen January 3rd, 2008 at 4:43 pm

Apparently B12
5. frits January 3rd, 2008 at 4:44 pm

the b12 defense? really?
6. Stephen January 3rd, 2008 at 4:44 pm

When asked by Wallace if McNamee had ever injected him with any drugs, Clemens responds: ďLidocaine and B-12. Itís for my joints, and B-12 I still take today.Ē

Clemens calls the accusation ďridiculousĒ and says he ďneverĒ used any banned substances.

ďSwear?Ē asks Wallace.

ď[I] swear,Ē says Clemens.
7. dadofjft January 3rd, 2008 at 4:50 pm

Was Miguel Tejada the one injecting him?
8. mel January 3rd, 2008 at 4:51 pm

Too bad Wallace didnít ask Roger to swear on his motherís grave. That would settle the whole thing.
9. jennifer- Hip Hip Jorge January 3rd, 2008 at 4:53 pm

Did he call Mcnamee a liar? Laughing Should Roger be on the look out for a lawsuit?
10. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Save the Three Musketeers! January 3rd, 2008 at 4:55 pm

It will not get settled beyond a reasonable doubt, IMO. It wouldnít be American if that happened.
11. Joey January 3rd, 2008 at 4:56 pm

I once had Lidocaine injected into me. Then my dentist filled my cavity.

I think thereís B12 in my multivitamin.

Iím contacting my agent. I stand to become a millionaire!

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Curt Schilling- Ace to Entreprenuer

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:05 pm

Interview with Fat Actress Curt Schilling- Ace to Entreprenuer
[quote]
http://www.wickedlocal.com/maynard/news/x1059343666


Maynard - From the outside, itís hard to imagine all the creating and designing thatís going on inside the walls of the ďClock TowerĒ building in Maynard, home to among other ventures, Curt Schillingís, 38 Studios. Even the door to the meeting room, a locally made castle door, seems to attest to the imaginations hard at work here. Thirty- eight Studios serves as the work place for 38 of the most brilliant, savvy and creative artistic minds found in the modern-day video gaming business. Sci-Fi/fantasy authors, artists including a toy designer, business entrepreneurs and yes, even a world champion pitcher assemble here all with one common goal in mind Ė to deliver the next frontier in entertainment, to create the next generation of Massively Multiplayer Online game (MMO). Schilling sat for an interview on Dec. 7.

LVO:The first question I think people want to know the answer to is what brought you to Maynard and specifically to 38 Studios?

CS: Well they actually happened in reverse, the 38 Studios vision, dream, is probably 20 years in the making. Iíve been a computer gamer my whole life and probably 6 or 7 years ago my wife and I were meeting with our financial people, and we were at a place in time when we knew things were going to be okay financially for our family for the rest of our lives and I broached the topic of what I wanted to do when I was done playing. I had no interest in opening up a store with my name on it, or a restaurant or anything like that and I told my financial advisor I said, ď I want to take a shot at making world-changing moneyĒ and he kind of laughed. And I said, ďI want to take a shot at opening a company that can make enough money that I can change the world with.Ē And he said, ďWell the only prerequisite obviously beyond the budget, would be that you do something you have a passion for.Ē Outside of the Lord, my family, and baseball, computer gaming is kind of my thing. So, I started to kind of lay the foundation for the company. I had a working relationship with Sony on-line entertainment at the time and got to know them, got to know people in the industry started to research the industry and I kind of took it like I approach starting a baseball game from a preparation standpoint. I would go and do little PR jaunts for them and I would literally take a notebook with me. Iíd take notes on thingsÖ from everything from the lay out of the developers cubes in the building, to how the teams work together or didnít work together, to my vision of management and staff interacting and all those things and then tried to get a feel for what it was like. I knew coming in, that I would do it drastically different because this has turned into an upscale sweatshop industry, where sixteen hour days for months on end is the norm, when it comes to the crunch time of producing a product. And, you know, Iíve always believed that great companies donít make great things, great people do. From the telephone, to the light bulb, to all of it, none of those were developed within a business model, they were developed by incredibly creative people, you know, brainstorming. So you need to create an environment that allows people to realize their God-given talents and then on top of that you need to put leadership in place that pushes them to places they never A, dreamed they could go or B, never thought about going. So you know, Iím way past answering your question, but Ö you understand that if you build the best sailing boat in the world and you put a crew that doesnít know how to sail a ship you canít leave the dockÖItís always about the people itís not about the technology or the idea, it always comes back to the people. So, I knew that building this company would be building a second family number one and that all of the business terms, the risk mitigation in the business is not in technology, itís in people and so I invested in a core team of people that I knew would ride through this journey because itís going to be incredibly tumultuous. Itís gonna have a lot of ups and downsÖ Redefining what people see as lose and failure, I think, is a challenge because in baseball you play close to 200 games a year. You win some. You lose some, but people equate failure and lose as the same thing and itís not. Theyíre two entirely different things. You have things that happen in your life everyday where you win or lose. Failure- you only fail something if you quit. And knowing that weíre not going to quit means weíre going to publish a game. Now, so if thatís a given - if weíre going to publish a game, then that doesnít separate us from anybody else. Everybody, everybodyís publishing games. To be the best in the world, to me is the benchmarkÖ So you create this culture, weíve created this culture here, led by the President Brett Close itís just off the charts. Itís incredibly fun.

LVO: And Maynard? Were you looking for something that was in close proximity?

CS: No, I accidentally found it. We looked all over the place. We found a couple different places Ö.we almost found this the same way we found our house which was by accident. It was just, ďHey thereís a property opened up over here and itís about 45, 50 minutes from home.Ē You know I never had to commute in traffic in my life, so I come to the office at 7 oíclock every morning and thereís traffic and itís weird, but I walked in here and this wasÖthis is it. This is where we belong. Our goal is to hopefully someday occupy this whole place.

LVO: Now the name was formerly Green Monster Gamesand then it became 38 Studios. Was that a couple years ago?

CS: No, weíre a year old now. October of last year, we literallyÖthis is the room the business started in. There were eleven of usÖ.

LVO: Itís a very loud room right now. (Heating pipes clanging in backgroundÖ..)

CS: Yeah, yeah. By law we couldnít leave the room because they were still working on renovating. So we literally were in this room everyday for the first six weeks laying the foundations of the company. But Green Monster Gameswas the initial name and at the end of the day, given the vision of the company, it really pigeonholed us and put us in a nitch that we didnít belong. So some of the people thought to go with 38 Studios as the tie in. They liked the name and thereís that tie in to the number but you know at the end of the day people in the computer game industry have no idea what 38 means. So thatís fine. I mean it will stand on its on merits.

LVO: I read on your blog that you yourself really, enjoy playing these games. Are you doing that while traveling?

CS: Iím playing MMOís Ė the massively multiplayer online gamesÖOne of the things that you have as a professional athlete is an immense amount of free time. Most of that is when youíre traveling. Iím married with children so the social life that I might have had when I was twenty or twenty-one no longer exists. And weíre in a culture and in a day and age when going out into the public can result in bad things even if you donít have bad intentions. So you know what? You remove any doubts any chance of something like that happening by just not doing it. And, some people may say, ďWell geeze thatís a rough way to live.Ē Well itís not. During the season I have commitments to keep and usually as we travel Iíll have business meetings around the cities weíre traveling in and Iíll keep in touch with everybody on the internet but itís what I do. These games allow me to literally hang out with my kids as well, because theyíre home and they get online and weíll play together and so itís just another little bit of a connection for us.

LVO: Is there a game that you particularly remember playing that you loved - the one that got you hooked?

CS: Well I mean the first game I ever played that really got me hooked was called Ever Quest. That was the game that kind of sealed the deal for me. Now my kids and I play a game called World of Warcraft. All of my boys are playing, my daughter plays and Iíve never gotten Shonda to take the plunge (laughter) but thatís the game of choice right now.

LVO: What would the plans be for the future here? What do you foresee?

CS: Weíre in preproduction of our first title.
LVO: Okay and whatís the date looking like?
CS: Well...itís not somethingÖ
LVO: Hard to tell?

CS: Yeah, well we know, but we donít talk about it right now. We have a target date. We have a budget and this is really a Hollywood type industry from a resources standpoint. It costs as much to put one of these games out from a development length and dollars standpoint as it does to put out a major motion picture. Your talking budgets between 50 and 100 million dollars. Weíre in a series B round of fundraising. This companyís fully self-funded at this point which is a huge advantage for us because I will retain ownership of the company and we will retain ownership of the intellectual property weíre creating. So you need to find strategic partners to do that with. And you go out and you talk to the Comcasts of the world and the AT&Tís and you know the companies that are seeing the game space now as an incredibly large revenue generator and are late to the party but weíre offering some companies a chance to get in on the top floor at some point.


Last edited by on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:07 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:05 pm

LVO: Before we move onto a little bit about baseball itís important to note that you and your wife Shonda have donated amazing amounts of time to a lot of the charitable organizations which weíll get to as well, but it also brings up the question that many people have asked me when they heard that I was doing this interview Ė ďHow is he able to balance being a businessman, pitching at the top of his game in the top division of baseball, writing on his blog, being so devoted to his fans, donating time to his numerous charities and being such a family and faith-filled guy?Ē How do you do it?

CS: You know, Iím not great at any one aspect of it. I do what I can do when I can do it.

The easiest way Iíve found is to really never give yourself a choice. When Iím here I have a job to do. You know the fatherhood thing, the husband thing is always a part of all of those things. But you have to have an incredibly strong wife, a rock at home to keep things in order. You know just being a professional ball player takes an incredibly different woman to live that life. I really never give myself choices, when Iím here I have a job to do, Iím focused on that. When weíre at a charity event your focusedÖI just focus on the moment at hand and you know I sit back at times and wonder if Iím missing stuff because the days fly and thereís always something to do and itís turned into a situation now, where the off season is busier than the regular season and so finding timeÖ Today itís a sequence of events. I have to be home at 4:15 for a Christmas card shoot, followed by an ABC Christmas interview, followed by a charity dinner at the home. And, everyday is kinda like that. And Shonda kind of reigns me in every now and then, says you know, ďslow down, slow down.Ē But, the balancing aspect of it is not really an issue just because I donít ever look at it like that. I do the best I can do with what I am given at the current time. And if thereís passion and love and concern for human beings it all works out.

LVO: Now youíre a man whoís also very public about your faith. How has your faith guided you in setting your goals and priorities and helped you in times of stress?

CS: You know faith makes everything very very easy from the stand point of I rarely, if ever, and I would challenge myself to come up with the last time, get worked up about stuff. You know the heat of battle competition on the field, yeah, I get adrenaline and excited but I donít get worked up over things. Iím the most optimistic human being youíll ever meet in your life. I am always and have always, I believe, saw the inherent good in everybody whether that was the right thing or wrong thing to do with people, itís the only way I know. Iím very very comfortable with who I am. I know I have immense flaws but that is one of the things that defines us as human beings. My faith makes life easy because Iím here for the time allotted and if I wake up tomorrow Iím thankful for the day I had and something new and incredible was going to happen that day. I think what itís also done is itís really stopped me from ever asking why things happen? Because as a Christian there are times when youíll look at someone elseís situation and youíll wonder how could that happen to so and so and then you look at things that have happened in your life and you think to yourselfÖ.Iíll give you an example. When I got traded to Arizona. That was probably the one place my wife did not want to go. And, we had a very large disagreement about the move. I kind of had a no trade clause and so I could pick where I wanted to go. I slipped Arizona in there kind of at the last moment. Unbeknownst to her, it happened and it came out of nowhere for her. She was not happy. It turned out to be the greatest thing ever but you know in a situation where we were Öthereís some adversity, my wife goes to Arizona with me and within a month, sheís diagnosed with skin cancer in a situation where doctors had been looking at her for six months saying ďAh Ė you know what? Donít worry about it.Ē And the first doctor in Arizona that saw it said, ďYou need to have this taken off immediately.Ē If we donít go to Arizona what happens? My wife probably isnít here. So, out of everything comes a result. Iím smart enough to know, that Iím not smart enough to try and figure it out. It just happens. You let it happen and out of every experience comes a lesson and if youíre stubborn you miss it and if youíre not, you get it. ÖIt never comes when you want it. It never comes how you want it. It comes how itís suppose to come. Faith to me is just really kind of unloading everything that burdens you from a worry stand point and saying, ďAlright? You know what? Iíll let You deal with it and Youíre going to deal the hand You need to deal me and Youíre not going to deal me a hand I canít play cause You told me in the bible that Youíll never put something on me that I canít withstand. And so it really does make things a lot easier.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:06 pm

LVO: This is another question thatís been asked, ďDo you personally feel that with fame comes responsibility and if so, what do you see that responsibility as entailing?Ē

CS: I absolutely believe that we have a responsibility to our teammates, to the organization and to the fan base to represent all three of those in a respectful way. I think thereís a responsibility to the fans to a degree. I think weíre in a time and place when fans believe theyíre entitled to everything from an access standpoint. Weíve gotten around that. The responsibility thingÖ for me a lot of it is just trying, sometimes I think too hard, to make people realize that outside of my God given talent we are no different. No different. You know I have those days when my kids are sick and Iím miserable. And everything that you have in your life, I have in mine, just in different ways. But people believe that the size of your paycheck dictates how youíre suppose to feel and nothing can be further from the truth. So the responsibility ...people want to make a point to tell you at times, ďYou know I canít think of someone that I would want my kid to emulate more than you and Iím so proud that youíre my sonís role model.Ē And I look back at the way I grew up and although I idolized baseball players and athletes, no one was ever the iconic figure that my father was. And my father was retired from the army,Öhe wasnít a star, but he was the embodiment of everything I ever wanted to be. When I became a husband and I became a father, the goals were easy for me. I wanted my kids and my family to think just a sliver of me in the way I thought about my dad.

LVO: As far as pitchingÖ. Youíre in a very high stress job out there. How do you keep your cool before, during and after the game?

CS: Before the game Iím not cool. Iím probably as nervous as anybody by far.
LVO: So what do you do?

CS: I just focus on getting prepared and I spend those days preparing for the game and once the game starts thatís the easy part. The game for me, thatís what I do. Itís like when youíre writing. When youíre sitting at your desk writing thatís your element. Iím in my element on the mound. Thereís stress, but itís not stress, thereís a tension an adrenaline that comes with competing. Thereís the ups if you win the downs if you lose but you know Iím probably by far more nervous than anybody on the day I pitch. Because you set a standard and itís not something that Ö.you can ever walk away from...itís there every timeÖpeople expect things from you. And you set a standard for yourself and a bar for yourself that has to be met every time and your playing against the best players in the world. And so itís an incredible challenge to maintain that consistency.
LVO: And afterwards?

CS: I get on-line and play when Iím on the road. I donít sleep much on the nights I pitch. This year I did a lot of blogging after I pitched breaking down the games. I have four kids so the whole bring you back down to earth thing is in your face and very easy to get when youíre at home.

LVO: You touched upon this earlier but several people have asked me and I wondered this too. What is the medal that you where around your neck? They noticed that before you go to the mound usually you turn away for a bit and grab it Ö.Ē

CS: Yeah, weíll itís a gift that I was given. And the cross symbolizesÖthe mesh wire that is holding the cross together represents the crown of thorns. The steel represents the spikes that were driven through His hands and the cord that ties it is the cord that was used to bind His hands and feet. And the pregame thing is prayer. I say a prayer before every start. I find a lot of peopleÖask the question, ďWhat do you think God is going to like one person over another on the baseball field? You can understand it to a sense,but Iím never praying to win. There might be some times when Iím struggling when I might ask for a little help but for the most part itís praying about being able to do the thing that He gave me the ability to do. Praying for the safety of all the players involved in the game and just thanking Him for the chance to experience what Iím about to experience. You know step-up on that mound, and baseball is very different. When you have the ball on the mound as a pitcher everybodyís watching you and itís an incredible rush. Iíve said it before Iím blessed so far beyond anything I could ever dream of, a beautiful healthy wife, four incredibly beautiful healthy kids and a job that is not really a job. I get to do the thing that I love most in life for a living. All the things that come with that are gravy but every five days I get to step on the mound at Fenway Park and pitch for a nation of 15, 20 million people.
LV: Now your dad is no longer with us right?
CS: Right.
LVO: Do you feel that he continues to influence your life?

CS: Oh, absolutely, absolutely. I leave a ticket for my dad every game that I ever pitch.
LVO: You do?

CS: Since 1988, Iíve left a ticket every game Iíve ever pitched. I was with my father when he had an aortic aneurysm and I was actually getting ready to take him to the airport to go back home to Colorado. I was separated from my family at the time. They were in Colorado waiting for him to come back. He died. He was on life support and I had to make the decision to...toÖbut that experience while it is by far in a way the most horrible thing that Iíve ever seen in my life, also made me realize that I had learned a lot from him because from the time he had the heart attack until he went to the hospital, I gave him CPR, I called the ambulance I was with him the entire way and I was totally calm. I was, as he would hope I was. But, I know that someday he and I will talk again and the ticket was and is a way to make sure he knows that everything thatís happening to me is a direct result of who he was. And so itís a pretty cool thing for me to be able to write his name on the pass list every five days. Some of the biggest games of my lifeÖ.Iíve learned more from my dad from the day he died till now then I did when he was alive.
LVO: Thatís interesting.

CS: I can remember sitting down on the bench before game seven of the World Series in 2001 and Iím pitching against the Yankees in Arizona and Roger Clemens, and all the side stories that went along with this game. And, I always do the things I do on the day I pitch on the same cycle, the same routine, and I can rememberÖ Iíll have conversations with him in a sense that, you know, that dialogue you have with someone when theyíre not around where you know what their response is going to be. And it was like I was pretty worked up and I can remember him saying, in my head saying, ďSeriously whatís the big deal? Youíre gonna go out in about a half hour and your gonna take the ball and do what youíve done your whole life. And your gonna pitch and then the game will be over and youíll win or lose but youíve done everything you can possibly do to be ready for this game. So, at some point you have to enjoy these things. You may never get here again.Ē
LVO: Just what you needed to hear.

CS: Yeah. Iím going to go out and Iím going to pitch and Iím going to have fun. Heís done that a lot for me over the last 19 years.

LVO: Your Red Sox teammates are actually like true family members in that like with actual families, you donít have a choice as to who your siblings are going to be and just like in actual families you often get very different personalities mixed in there under the same roof. Can you tell me some of the roles that your teammates play in that mix? Is there someone playing the older wiser brother, the comic relief?

CS: One of the things about that is that this is a very different household playing in Boston. There are external pressures and external things that donít happen anywhere else so you have to be a little bit different from an equipment standpoint mentally to play here. We have, every team has characters that play the role, the leader, the funny guy. On this team there are a group of guys. Jason is the leader, not the vocal leader. Heís the guy who goes out and plays the game the way itís suppose to be played and he really leads by example. There are a couple of us who are more vocal and comfortable being vocal about it, who I think, say the things that need to be said when no one else will say them. You also have to have a manager who allows that to happen and Terry Francona is very good about allowing the clubhouse to police itself. Doug Mirabelli is the funny guy. Eric Hinske's the funny guy. We got a ton of great guys from a comic relief standpoint but everybody fills a nitch. With the amount of cultures that are put together every year and the amount of backgrounds that we have, itís essential that you have the ability to get in somebodyís face and not have them take it personal when itís not

LVO: Why do you feel that the combination works so well in that it had you bring home the World Championship again this season?

CS: Number one is talent... Itís an incredibly talented group of guys, thatís the first thing you have to have. Number two, you have to be semi injury-free. Everyone has to stay healthy. You have to have depth. You have to have a thorough blend of talent all the way up and down your roster cause everybodyís going to contribute. But I think it starts at the top. You have to have somebody playing here who doesnít panic, who doesnít act and react to the media because when the manager shows that vulnerability is seeps into the clubhouse. And, Terry Francona is the best Iíve ever seen at it. He takes it with a grain of salt here like nobody that Iíve ever been around. This media can be burdensome at times and invasive and he doesnít allow that to fester in the clubhouse. You know if he feels like something is potentially going to get out of hand heís the guy that has the meeting to stop it before it happens. So it does it starts at the top. The ownership Mr.Luchino, Mr. Henry, Mr. Werner make it very clear that theyíre committed to not just us but our families, which is huge.
LVO: Playing for Red Sox Nation, what does it mean to you?

CS: Itís one of those things. I canít fathom my career ending without this experience. I mean this just makes me realize that the years I spent in baseball before this were incredible and fun but there is no other place Ö. This is Notre Dame football, Packer football, Yankee baseball, Lakers basketball you know, Montreal hockey all rolled in to one. I said when I came here in New England itís Catholicism and Red Sox baseball and not necessarily in that order. The thing that really kinda hit me, knocked me off my feet when I first signed here was that fact that it was Thanksgiving in 2003 and there were people in New England who were saying their Thanksgiving prayer. I was part of that prayer. I mean thatís not the Arizona Diamondbacks or the San Diego Padres, thatís a whole different level. You come here and experience it and you realize these people are personally invested in you and your life. What you do off the field and how you act matters to them. And so thereís a level of accountably that comes with playing in this organization that a lot of other teams donít have and I like it! I can see where it might be a challenge when I was a younger player, but at this stage in my career itís something that I absolutely cherish and it made the decision to come back here to me, a no brainer.


LVO: What did if feel like to win the World Series again? Was there a memorable moment in the series that stands out in your mind?

CS: Thereís no singular memories as much this time around as there were just visions of you know Josh setting the tone in the post season with that first start in AnaheimÖ This was the first World Championship team of the three that Iíve been on where I didnít think it was gonna happen, up until it happened. Up until we made the last out in game seven against Cleveland, I wasnít sure. You know it didnít feel the same, so in a way it made it just as special as the last one because when we went in to play Colorado, you know with the eight days off and we played that first game and it just seemed very clear that we were incredibly sharp and focused and they were knocking some of the rust off. In a seven game series you donít have any time to catch up so you know I felt like whoever was going to come out of the National League was going to be at a disadvantage this year. From a special stand point theyíre all special . Iíve heard multiple people say this. I have three World Series Championships and they are like your kids. Theyíre all incredibly special for their own reasons.

LVO: I know that Jonathan Papelbon was on LettermanHalloween night because I saw him, and he was speaking of David Ortiz giving a speech to you. Do you feel that that was somewhat of a defining moment?

CS: Well there were a couple of us that sat up and talked and you know the thing that that meeting did and the point that I tried to make in that meeting was that ďWe do not have to come back and win three games in a row against Cleveland. We have to go tonight and we have to win the first inning. We have to win this game one pitch, one out, one at bat, one inning at a time. And if we can win the first inning or play to a tie, then we win the second inning. When you can get a group of people that are that talented focused on the moment Ė all of them Ė you canít get beat. It was the formula that we used in 2004. We had this meeting in 2004 down three ďoĒ and it was the thing I said at that time. This is all about the moment. Winning the pitch, every at bat, every pitch grinding out every single inning, everything you do, doing it to perfection. And understanding that you know, each game is itís own little series. When you get guys, that again, that are that talented and then a fan base like this it makes it kind of easy to do something like that, whereas other teams might have trouble focusing.

LVO: How about Mike Lowell? Were you worried that it might not get done?
CS: Yeah.
LVO: Were you sopsychedwhen you heard?

CS: I was beyond ecstatic. Mike is a manís man. That guy ÖI was worried about him possibly going to New York, for the reason thatÖ not because itís the Yankees but because Mike is one of those guys who comes in and stabilizes a clubhouse. His presence and his experience are infecting. You catch it. And he is a guy who can come into this market, like any other market, and thereís a sense of calmness around him. He plays the game right. He plays the game hard. Heís damn good and he doesnít take it to a level thatís unattainable. He makes you understand itÖ.as an everyday player. Iím not the kind of guy that can be a leader on a team, in a sense, because Iím a pitcher. I play once every five days. I have no idea what the physical grind is for those guys that play every day. So you need somebody like him. And, when you donít have him itís very apparent that thereís a whole somewhere in the chemistry of a club. And you know that was such a huge thing. And the fact is, that the Red SoxÖ.they changedÖ.after the 04 team a lot of guys left. It was very clear and you know you understand it, a lot of guys left because the front office made it very clear, ďWeíre not going to be married to a team that did win it. We are trying to put together a team that can win it. And we donít believe that these are the right guys going forward.Ē Now, you know obviously our opinions differ because this is family. Trading away and letting family members go, but, they had the same approach this time around but they looked at the pieces differently and they realized that these guys were going to be a big part of us going ahead.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:07 pm

LVO: And the blog? What made you decide to have the fans write in?

CS: Well Mike and I talked about the blog a couple times and I actually just mailed him 219 pages of thank youís yesterday.

LVO: After you won the World Series in 2004 there was a significant amount of roster turnover. How does it feel to know that come spring you will be going back to a team with so many of the same pieces that helped you to win this year?

CS: Itís comforting. In 2001 when we won the World Series in Arizona we went to spring training in 2002 with pretty much the same team, won the division again and went to the post season. And I think we felt we were very good. Thereís a very similar feeling right now for me with this team. This is an incredibly positive mix. Thereís young and old, all very talented and now you know, the Santana thing is a possibility and all this other stuff happening. We play in the toughest division of baseball- hands down the toughest division in baseball, so itís incredibly reassuring to know that weíre going in with the same core group of guys who went through it all and did it before.

LVO: ďDo you think in this league itís enough to stick with what won if for you this year, or is there a need to constantly upgrade the roster to keep up with the competition?Ē

CS: I think you have to assess it individually each year. You know, I just said, in 04, Theo looked at the roster and said, ďWe have certain guys becoming free agents. I donít believe this guy and this guy are going to be good long-term investments and they look at it as a business. And as players, itís very personal, and so thereís a detachment there that happens, but heís done a pretty damn good job since heís got here. So I trust the fact that he is going toÖ.Weíre are in a market that has to win every year because of the demands and expectations of the fan base. So you know heís doing everything he can do to put the best possible team on the field that he can. And when you can trust the front office like that, youíll never hear players on this team say you know ďIíd really wish weíd go get this guy or sign this guy or make this trade.Ē Theyíre doing everything they can do.

LVO: ďYou are one of the best post season pitchers of all times. What is it about the playoffs that brings out the best in you?Ē

CS: Itís the ultimate stage. Itís a situation when you think that just about everybody else wouldnít have the ability to do it. You get into that stage and itís the most important games and no ones expecting anybody to be that much better than everybody else. So I look at it as the ultimate pass/fail test. You donít get second chances so every game really is do or die and I always feel like mentally Iím so much better than everybody else that Iím going to win I just need to hurry up and get the result. You know itís an arrogant, egotistical thing I guess in a sense, but itís the only way I can function when I have a ball in my hand. Itís just that innate belief thereís nobody thatís going to step to the plate that is going to be consistently better than me. You know I do take the pitching match up personal. The other guy on the other team, Iím pitching against him. I always look at it as Iíve been here. Iíve done this. Iím better than this guy and this guy is not going to out pitch me. Itís just going out there and making it happen.

LVO: ďYou probably have been asked this countless times, but after winning your third World Series many athletes in your stage of their career would chose to go out on top. What made you want to come back for one more year knowing that it might not have the same fairytale ending?Ē

CS: Iím just not smart. We had planned on this being the final season and there really is no better scenario with which to walk away from. I think thereís a lot of things that happened this year on a personal level that I was incredibly unhappy with, in how I performed. I did not want this to be my last year. I still feel like thereís a better pitcher left here that wasnít there last year and I want to go out, having the season I know I can have and winning one more.

LVO: ďWho is the best pitcher that you have ever pitched with on the same team?Ē

CS: Randy [Johnson], by far was the best pitcher. Iíve had a chance to pitch with him and Pedro [Martinez]. Randy was the best pitcher for a period of time that I pitched, the two years he had in 2001, 2002 were the two most dominating seasons Iíve ever seen. I think he and Pedro would be the two that I would say were by the far the best. And then I would probably put Josh in there, as the guy who probably after next year, will be, when I look back and say ďWhose the best guy to play with?Ē Itís gonna be those three guys, with Randy the best at the time, Josh probably being right there.

LVO: This oneís from my husband. ďWhatís your off season like? Do you get to spend much time with your family? Do they go to spring training with you?Ē

CS: Unfortunately, this off-season is twice as busy as the regular season. So, Iím at the office usually by 8,8:30 in the morning and Iím home usually 5:30, 6. Not as much time as I would like. Had I the chance to go back and do it all over again I probably would have waited to do the company thing. Theyíve already sacrificed so much, for me. Generally spring training theyíll come down for a week during spring break. Our kids are now at the age where their social lives are a big deal and itís another one of the reasons why we wanted to stay here to allow them to build that foundation that you have as a kid growing up with your same friends. You know next yearís going to be a little different for us, going to Japan in mid-March.

LVO: ďIs there a routine that you do before you go to spring training?Ē

CS: Spring training kind of started about a week and a half ago from a work out standpoint, just getting ready for next year. Iím at a point in time in my life where physically I need to lose weight. I need to drop down to a weight I havenít been at for probably ten years. Because Iím older things are harder. I need to pay more attention to that. I was never the Adonis body type, but things always came very easy physically to me on the baseball field and as you get older those things change and itís just a slow process. And, you donít notice a lot of times and it creeps up on you. Iím at that point where Iíve got to do a lot of different things now to just be normal, not even better. Just to be normal Iíve got to do different stuff.



LVO: ďWhatís your Christmas wish list for the Red Sox organization. What are your hopes and dreams for next season?Ē

CS: Christmas wish list would be that we show up in spring training with our entire roster completely healthy. With Manny going into the final year of his contract, thereíll be some incentive there for him to have a special year..With David being healthy. On kind of a selfish note I hope Doug Mirabelli comes back. Heís one of my better friends in the game and one of my favorite people of all time. But, you know, theyíve already answered my wish list. This is a dream organization from that standpointÖWhen the game starts itís on us, and this ownership puts us in a place to win every year where it really comes down to how well we play. So from a wish list standpoint you just want everybody to have a safe off-season and everybody show up healthy next year. Obviously the fairytale ending is Iíd love to be on the mound for game seven, in the 9th inning with a five nothing lead and throw a complete game and we win another World Series and then I can walk away.


LVO: Ö The Red Sox are flirting with the idea of a six man pitching rotation?

CS: Yeah. Itís certainly a potential luxury having as much talent as we have, and the mix is almost perfect in that you have Wake and I. Iíve always been a guy who pitched on my fifth day no matter what the rotation was. And then coming over here now with Josh and Dice, Josh tends to want to be out there every 5th day for the most part early in the year. Dice K coming from a six-man rotation in Japan. Wake and I being able to use the extra day. Johnny Lester and Clay Buchholz both being on the Red Sox program which means if they start the beginning of the season, they wonít be able to throw 225 innings cause theyíll have an innings cut off point. You know thatís a potential scenario that very few teams have. Very few teams have three or four good big league starting pitchers, weíve got six. So, I can see it being messed with.

LVO: What do you think itís going to take for you guys to win back the World Championship?

CS: Health. I think weíre so good and so deep that if we stay healthy. We never won more than four in a row last year, we never lost more than four in a row until, until we won out to end the season. That comes back to starting pitching. We had a deep solid staff. Our bullpen was phenomenal. Itís health. We just have to stay healthy.

LVO: Can you tell me how you and Shonda chose to work with these different charities Lou Gehrigs (ALS) and The SHADE Foundation?

CS: I met a patient in 1992. The ALS Foundation in Philadelphia was the charity of the Phillies much like the Jimmy Fund is to the Red Sox. We had just kind of begun to establish ourselves and we wanted to get involved with something out in the field. Iím a typical male. Iím obsessive compulsive. I do everything at 150 miles an hour. I met Ellen Phillips the President of the Chapter and wanted to get involved and we just dove in headfirst and started a bunch of different programs. Weíre now in the 15th year of the ďCurtís Pitch for ALSĒ program and the golf tournament there. Weíre in the 7th year for the Arizona chapter in the above programs and then we have the program running in Boston as well. Every winter we go back and do all the events in the different cities. SHADE Foundation was my wifeís answer to being a cancer patient. Sheís a cancer survivor and she took something that people might file away as an unpleasant memory and as a horrible experience, turned it around into something she shares with everybody in a message that is powerful. She took a life threatening illness and turned it into a cure for other people. Itís that simple because the SHADE Foundation provides sunscreens for schools. And Arizona has the second highest skin cancer rate, next to Australia, on the planet and our kids went to school there. At the peak sun times of the day the kids are out on the playground. So they put shades over the playgrounds. But it hit home for meÖthe first event they did was a screening at the ballpark just to get the SHADE Foundation kicked off and they found three people diagnosed with stage two or stage three melanomas that had no idea. There are three people that would be dead today that arenít because of what my wife did. That really is the ultimate calling isnít it? God puts us on this earth to make other peopleís lives better and sheís done that.

LVO: Do you feel that there are any misconceptions out there about you that youíd want to clear up?

CS: Well thereís lot of things said about me that as a human being you donít appreciate. People feel that Iím an attention whore; glory hound hogthingÖwhich I think if you talked to the people that know me youíd know that a lot of that is just the opposite. Iím opinionated. Iím very opinionated and Iím passionate about life. So, if you ask me a question, and you can tell through this interview, I donít have the ability to say ďyesĒ or ďnoĒ to things because the things that I believe in, Iím passionate about and I have a belief on. Iíve never claimed to be right all the time and I know Iím not. I know Iíve made some heinous mistakes in my career saying things that I shouldnít have said. But, that doesnít make me anything other than human. You know the people that chastise me have all done the same things. That doesnít make it right, itís just kinda that whole glass house thing. But, thatís the only way I know how. Thatís who I am and the bottom line is Iím okay with being wrong as long as me being wrong isnít a malicious attempt on somebody else. The Barry Bonds quotes from earlier in the year? What a horrible thing to say. Regardless of whether I felt it or not, or whether I believe it or not itís not my place to do that and when you think about the impact of those comments and not just on Barry but on his family...I have kids. And, so there are times that I wish I would have shut up, but the bottom line is I know that Iím a good person. I know that I donít mean ill-will toward anybody. I know that I have a window of opportunity to be a spoke person for ALS that will close when baseballís over. I know that I have a window of opportunity for any of the other things Iím doing that will close when baseballís over. The mediaÖitís really a damned if you do Ė damned if you donít thing. The unfortunate part is that fans attribute the media commentary and editorial as expertise Ö

LVO: A perfect day for you would be what? If you could just have a perfect day Ö

CS: Sleep till noon. Wake up and have my wifeís Tennessee breakfast. Take a nap. Probably play some semblance of game with all of my kids. Come into the office for a couple hours. Hang around these incredible people. Go home. Play catch with Gehrig. Find out about my daughterís day. Sit around the table as a family. Have a dinner and talk. Things you donít get a lot of. Then a family movie in the theater with popcorn and then a Schilling family night on the bed.

LVO: What do you want people to remember you most for a hundred years from now? What are the accomplishments youíre most proud of?

CS: A hundred years from now I want people to say that I was the person that was most responsible for finding the cure for ALS.[/quote]

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:11 pm

Interview with Fat Actress Curt Schilling- Ace to Entreprenuer

http://www.wickedlocal.com/maynard/news/x1059343666
LVO: Why do you feel that the combination works so well in that it had you bring home the World Championship again this season?

CS: Number one is talent... Itís an incredibly talented group of guys, thatís the first thing you have to have. Number two, you have to be semi injury-free. Everyone has to stay healthy. You have to have depth. You have to have a thorough blend of talent all the way up and down your roster cause everybodyís going to contribute. But I think it starts at the top. You have to have somebody playing here who doesnít panic, who doesnít act and react to the media because when the manager shows that vulnerability is seeps into the clubhouse. And, Terry Francona is the best Iíve ever seen at it. He takes it with a grain of salt here like nobody that Iíve ever been around. This media can be burdensome at times and invasive and he doesnít allow that to fester in the clubhouse. You know if he feels like something is potentially going to get out of hand heís the guy that has the meeting to stop it before it happens. So it does it starts at the top. The ownership Mr.Luchino, Mr. Henry, Mr. Werner make it very clear that theyíre committed to not just us but our families, which is huge.
LVO: Playing for Red Sox Nation, what does it mean to you?

CS: Itís one of those things. I canít fathom my career ending without this experience. I mean this just makes me realize that the years I spent in baseball before this were incredible and fun but there is no other place Ö. This is Notre Dame football, Packer football, Yankee baseball, Lakers basketball you know, Montreal hockey all rolled in to one. I said when I came here in New England itís Catholicism and Red Sox baseball and not necessarily in that order. The thing that really kinda hit me, knocked me off my feet when I first signed here was that fact that it was Thanksgiving in 2003 and there were people in New England who were saying their Thanksgiving prayer. I was part of that prayer. I mean thatís not the Arizona Diamondbacks or the San Diego Padres, thatís a whole different level. You come here and experience it and you realize these people are personally invested in you and your life. What you do off the field and how you act matters to them. And so thereís a level of accountably that comes with playing in this organization that a lot of other teams donít have and I like it! I can see where it might be a challenge when I was a younger player, but at this stage in my career itís something that I absolutely cherish and it made the decision to come back here to me, a no brainer.

LVO: What did if feel like to win the World Series again? Was there a memorable moment in the series that stands out in your mind?

CS: Thereís no singular memories as much this time around as there were just visions of you know Josh setting the tone in the post season with that first start in AnaheimÖ This was the first World Championship team of the three that Iíve been on where I didnít think it was gonna happen, up until it happened. Up until we made the last out in game seven against Cleveland, I wasnít sure. You know it didnít feel the same, so in a way it made it just as special as the last one because when we went in to play Colorado, you know with the eight days off and we played that first game and it just seemed very clear that we were incredibly sharp and focused and they were knocking some of the rust off. In a seven game series you donít have any time to catch up so you know I felt like whoever was going to come out of the National League was going to be at a disadvantage this year. From a special stand point theyíre all special . Iíve heard multiple people say this. I have three World Series Championships and they are like your kids. Theyíre all incredibly special for their own reasons.

LVO: I know that Jonathan Papelbon was on LettermanHalloween night because I saw him, and he was speaking of David Ortiz giving a speech to you. Do you feel that that was somewhat of a defining moment?

CS: Well there were a couple of us that sat up and talked and you know the thing that that meeting did and the point that I tried to make in that meeting was that ďWe do not have to come back and win three games in a row against Cleveland. We have to go tonight and we have to win the first inning. We have to win this game one pitch, one out, one at bat, one inning at a time. And if we can win the first inning or play to a tie, then we win the second inning. When you can get a group of people that are that talented focused on the moment Ė all of them Ė you canít get beat. It was the formula that we used in 2004. We had this meeting in 2004 down three ďoĒ and it was the thing I said at that time. This is all about the moment. Winning the pitch, every at bat, every pitch grinding out every single inning, everything you do, doing it to perfection. And understanding that you know, each game is itís own little series. When you get guys, that again, that are that talented and then a fan base like this it makes it kind of easy to do something like that, whereas other teams might have trouble focusing.

LVO: How about Mike Lowell? Were you worried that it might not get done?
CS: Yeah.
LVO: Were you sopsychedwhen you heard?

CS: I was beyond ecstatic. Mike is a manís man. That guy ÖI was worried about him possibly going to New York, for the reason thatÖ not because itís the Yankees but because Mike is one of those guys who comes in and stabilizes a clubhouse. His presence and his experience are infecting. You catch it. And he is a guy who can come into this market, like any other market, and thereís a sense of calmness around him. He plays the game right. He plays the game hard. Heís damn good and he doesnít take it to a level thatís unattainable. He makes you understand itÖ.as an everyday player. Iím not the kind of guy that can be a leader on a team, in a sense, because Iím a pitcher. I play once every five days. I have no idea what the physical grind is for those guys that play every day. So you need somebody like him. And, when you donít have him itís very apparent that thereís a whole somewhere in the chemistry of a club. And you know that was such a huge thing. And the fact is, that the Red SoxÖ.they changedÖ.after the 04 team a lot of guys left. It was very clear and you know you understand it, a lot of guys left because the front office made it very clear, ďWeíre not going to be married to a team that did win it. We are trying to put together a team that can win it. And we donít believe that these are the right guys going forward.Ē Now, you know obviously our opinions differ because this is family. Trading away and letting family members go, but, they had the same approach this time around but they looked at the pieces differently and they realized that these guys were going to be a big part of us going ahead.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:13 pm

Here's some a little summary - Interview with Curt Schilling- Ace to Entrepreneur

http://www.wickedlocal.com/maynard/news/x1059343666
LVO: Why do you feel that the combination works so well in that it had you bring home the World Championship again this season?

CS: Number one is talent... Itís an incredibly talented group of guys, thatís the first thing you have to have. Number two, you have to be semi injury-free. Everyone has to stay healthy. You have to have depth. You have to have a thorough blend of talent all the way up and down your roster cause everybodyís going to contribute. But I think it starts at the top. You have to have somebody playing here who doesnít panic, who doesnít act and react to the media because when the manager shows that vulnerability is seeps into the clubhouse. And, Terry Francona is the best Iíve ever seen at it. He takes it with a grain of salt here like nobody that Iíve ever been around. This media can be burdensome at times and invasive and he doesnít allow that to fester in the clubhouse. You know if he feels like something is potentially going to get out of hand heís the guy that has the meeting to stop it before it happens. So it does it starts at the top. The ownership Mr.Luchino, Mr. Henry, Mr. Werner make it very clear that theyíre committed to not just us but our families, which is huge.
LVO: Playing for Red Sox Nation, what does it mean to you?

CS: Itís one of those things. I canít fathom my career ending without this experience. I mean this just makes me realize that the years I spent in baseball before this were incredible and fun but there is no other place Ö. This is Notre Dame football, Packer football, Yankee baseball, Lakers basketball you know, Montreal hockey all rolled in to one. I said when I came here in New England itís Catholicism and Red Sox baseball and not necessarily in that order. The thing that really kinda hit me, knocked me off my feet when I first signed here was that fact that it was Thanksgiving in 2003 and there were people in New England who were saying their Thanksgiving prayer. I was part of that prayer. I mean thatís not the Arizona Diamondbacks or the San Diego Padres, thatís a whole different level. You come here and experience it and you realize these people are personally invested in you and your life. What you do off the field and how you act matters to them. And so thereís a level of accountably that comes with playing in this organization that a lot of other teams donít have and I like it! I can see where it might be a challenge when I was a younger player, but at this stage in my career itís something that I absolutely cherish and it made the decision to come back here to me, a no brainer.

LVO: What did if feel like to win the World Series again? Was there a memorable moment in the series that stands out in your mind?

CS: Thereís no singular memories as much this time around as there were just visions of you know Josh setting the tone in the post season with that first start in AnaheimÖ This was the first World Championship team of the three that Iíve been on where I didnít think it was gonna happen, up until it happened. Up until we made the last out in game seven against Cleveland, I wasnít sure. You know it didnít feel the same, so in a way it made it just as special as the last one because when we went in to play Colorado, you know with the eight days off and we played that first game and it just seemed very clear that we were incredibly sharp and focused and they were knocking some of the rust off. In a seven game series you donít have any time to catch up so you know I felt like whoever was going to come out of the National League was going to be at a disadvantage this year. From a special stand point theyíre all special . Iíve heard multiple people say this. I have three World Series Championships and they are like your kids. Theyíre all incredibly special for their own reasons.

LVO: I know that Jonathan Papelbon was on LettermanHalloween night because I saw him, and he was speaking of David Ortiz giving a speech to you. Do you feel that that was somewhat of a defining moment?

CS: Well there were a couple of us that sat up and talked and you know the thing that that meeting did and the point that I tried to make in that meeting was that ďWe do not have to come back and win three games in a row against Cleveland. We have to go tonight and we have to win the first inning. We have to win this game one pitch, one out, one at bat, one inning at a time. And if we can win the first inning or play to a tie, then we win the second inning. When you can get a group of people that are that talented focused on the moment Ė all of them Ė you canít get beat. It was the formula that we used in 2004. We had this meeting in 2004 down three ďoĒ and it was the thing I said at that time. This is all about the moment. Winning the pitch, every at bat, every pitch grinding out every single inning, everything you do, doing it to perfection. And understanding that you know, each game is itís own little series. When you get guys, that again, that are that talented and then a fan base like this it makes it kind of easy to do something like that, whereas other teams might have trouble focusing.

LVO: How about Mike Lowell? Were you worried that it might not get done?
CS: Yeah.
LVO: Were you sopsychedwhen you heard?

CS: I was beyond ecstatic. Mike is a manís man. That guy ÖI was worried about him possibly going to New York, for the reason thatÖ not because itís the Yankees but because Mike is one of those guys who comes in and stabilizes a clubhouse. His presence and his experience are infecting. You catch it. And he is a guy who can come into this market, like any other market, and thereís a sense of calmness around him. He plays the game right. He plays the game hard. Heís damn good and he doesnít take it to a level thatís unattainable. He makes you understand itÖ.as an everyday player. Iím not the kind of guy that can be a leader on a team, in a sense, because Iím a pitcher. I play once every five days. I have no idea what the physical grind is for those guys that play every day. So you need somebody like him. And, when you donít have him itís very apparent that thereís a whole somewhere in the chemistry of a club. And you know that was such a huge thing. And the fact is, that the Red SoxÖ.they changedÖ.after the 04 team a lot of guys left. It was very clear and you know you understand it, a lot of guys left because the front office made it very clear, ďWeíre not going to be married to a team that did win it. We are trying to put together a team that can win it. And we donít believe that these are the right guys going forward.Ē Now, you know obviously our opinions differ because this is family. Trading away and letting family members go, but, they had the same approach this time around but they looked at the pieces differently and they realized that these guys were going to be a big part of us going ahead.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:16 pm

Mets May have Best Offer

...posted by Matthew Cerrone...

http://www.metsblog.com/

During his appearance on WFAN today, SI.comís Jon Heyman said that the Twins know they must trade Johan Santana, and the Ďgeneral sense around baseballí is that they will.

According to Heyman, the Yankees and Mets are most interested in Santana, but Yankees GM Brian Cashman does not want to make a move.

The Mets, however, notes Heyman, are very serious - so much so that Ďsome Mets peopleí believe they have made the Ďbest offer so far,í i.e., Ďany four of their prospects.í

Öfirst off, this would suggest that i should zip it when i say, ĎOmar, pull the trigger,í because, from what heyman is saying, itís not a matter of omar pulling a trigger, itís about the Twins pulling a triggerÖ

Öthat said, i had written something similar to heymanís comments last week, noting how people connected to the Mets seemed Ďvery optimistic,í but that people connected to santana continued to see boston as a favoriteÖthat disconnect, as a Mets fan, has always been alarming to meÖiím glad that at least heyman is hearing a similar sense of positivity, not that it makes me any more or less confident in santana ending up in queensÖ

Heyman also discussed his Hall of Fame votes, the Nick Swisher trade, the future of Roger Clemens and the relationship between Scott Boras and Alex Rodriguez.

To listen to Heymanís full interview, go to WFAN.com.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:20 pm


http://proxy.espn.go.com/chat/chatESPN?event_id=18665
Shant (NYC): Speaking of Hankenstein, isn't he tampering yet again with his recent proclamations?

SportsNation Keith Law: I believe it's acceptable to comment on a player when you are in active negotiations to acquire him. Whether acceptable means "explicitly allowed" or "tacitly allowed" is another matter, but I don't think Hank has done anything wrong ... in that sense.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:23 pm


http://proxy.espn.go.com/chat/chatESPN?event_id=18658

Devito-Ma: Where do Yankees rank behind Rays and Redsox in prospect handbook?

SportsNation Jim Callis: John Manuel has kindly IMed me our Top 5: Devil Rays, Red Sox, Reds, Rangers, Yankees, in that order.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:25 pm

They are saying that the trade could happen within the next weekÖif it does, you are going to need to find some new filler material, Cerrone! Still a few weeks till Pís and Cís

Seriously. Want Johan more than any other player in MLB, but 3-5 posts daily about who said what in regards to when are starting to get ridiculous. There is such a thing as over-reporting something. I think at this point we all have a pretty good feel for whats happened and what its gonna take to bring him here. I dont need to know if Peter Gammons took a dump next to someone that looked like Santana in a public urinal. If there is legitimatly a news break, then ABSOLUTLEY

Iím not complaining about it at all..Iím glad that Matt is able to provide us with ALL the detail regarding Johan, that way it is easier to get an accurate picture of what is going on. Its been a really slow off-season that Santana non-news has dominated the boardÖI mean nothing else is going on that would be of even remote interest to the Met fan

Supposedly, they are friends. At least, Santana made some public comments about how mad he was when the Twins traded Castillo away last yea

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:30 pm

BH says:

January 3rd, 2008 at 4:04 pm

Hughes is not a legit #1. You have to have more than 1/2 a seson under your belt to claim that titile. Heís a choice for a good #3 but he still needs to show he can do it over a full season and do it year after year. Heís got potential but thatís it. Same with Slowey, Baker and Blackburn. Fatty has shown he CANíT do it so you have to hope he changes his stripes. Again, with that rotation Twins lose 90 so you might as well go for nothing but prospects becuase you hve no chance for 2-3 years.

Me too says:

January 3rd, 2008 at 4:05 pm

If Liriano comes back strong, we should have our #1. He was nicknamed ďfranchiseĒ for a reason. Hughes would make an excellent #2 or #3, but to project him as an Ace seems alittle presumptuous (I know staying that if Liriano comes back strong is abit presumptuous as well).
I guess being an ace is really a perspective thing, based on the staff you are pitching on. If Santana was here, no way would anyone else be considered an ace.
Anyway, the reason you want a legitimate #1 is you want to match your pitchers up with other teams pitchers. Your #5 wonít fare well against a #1, and vice-versa. Of course it is even more important come playoff time, but realistically, I donít think we have to be too worried about that for a year or 2.

sane says:

January 3rd, 2008 at 4:07 pm

The question with Hughes is his durability, not his health.
His health is probably fine.
I donít think medical information can tell you whether or not he will have shoulder tendonitis, tired arm or a hamstring problem in the future.
These are problems which he has had in the past and may never (or often) reoccur.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:37 pm

Latest Santana Buzz From MetsBlog

MetsBlog's Matthew Cerrone has a couple of recent radio reports referencing the team's talks for Johan Santana. One involves Mike Francesa, the other Jon Heyman.

* Francesa says the Twins are still demanding Jose Reyes, and the Mets will never do that.
* According to Heyman, the Mets might be willing to give up any four of their prospects. As in Fernando Martinez, Deolis Guerra, Carlos Gomez, and Kevin Mulvey? That would seemingly be impossible for the Twins to turn down. ESPN's Keith Law went as far to say today that he "wouldn't deal Martinez for one year of Santana under any circumstances."

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:40 pm

Kennedy is less likely to be a total bust. At worst I am pretty confident he will be a #4 starter in the AL, while Guerra could never reach the majors at all. Law has strong opinions on guys (has always been down on Hughes), but I don't have a problem with him going with the guy more likely to make a difference at this point.
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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:42 pm

I don't see the leverage the Twins have here. The Yanks are constantly pulling out, and though they need him more than the Sox they would hate for the Sox to get him. The Sox are keeping him away from the Yanks and have a perfectly good rotation as is. The only team who has a need and a realistic chance of getting Santana is the Mets, unless the Yankees are willing to deal Hughes. To me, it's never looked like the Yanks want to deal Hughes unless it's nearly a straight-up deal (Melky has very little value).

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:45 pm

Hanks allowed to talk , he's the owner. The less I hear from Cashman the better. The dude did a terrible job with the pitching staff over the last 5 years and its showed every year come playoff time. Maybe these kids will help redeem his legacy here but right now when I see Cashman talk all I see in my head is Carl Pavano , Jared Wright and Kevin Brown.

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 3:55 pm


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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 4:23 pm

Don, Don't forget about Radomski who's former Mets Club house attendant who was supplier for Mcnamee.. How come your ignoring him? Everyone in the Ny Media always pointing fingers at Yankees? The Yankees are ruining baseball , They're bad and Evil. Where's Redsox? Where double standard? Dan How do you feel about Loduca , Mota, Schoenweis now?

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 4:35 pm

Is it odd that The Yankees have 207 homeruns and leads in Mlb in that category but They're last in homeruns per at bat?

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 4:44 pm

My Friend who's a Redsox Fan that I know will hate Joba even more now because They're think He

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Re: Santana

Post  RedMagma on Thu Jan 03, 2008 4:50 pm

2007 Yankees = A ton of Contact hitters and [Babip] Batting average on balls in play?

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